London A Level Results League Tables

College
AVG POINTS PER EXAM
POINTS + GRADE FOR BEST 3 A LEVELS 

Brampton College

43.22

42.50 B+

Ashbourne College

41.80

41.54 B

Cambridge Tutors 

40.38

41.84 B

MPW London

39.44

38.63 B

Bellerbys London

38

42.22 B+

DLD College

37.93

40.28 B

Fine Arts

35.37

35.80 C+

Collingham

35.07

34.18 C+

CATS College

34.43

36.09 B+

Duff Miller

33.36

34.06 C+

David Game

32.92

34.69 C+

Lansdowne College

30.86

31.28 C

Ealing Independent

29.77

33.09 C+

Chelsea Independent

28.79

28.01 C-

Bales College

21.83

20.00 D

Abbey College London

No Data

No Data

Results based on new UCAS tariff points system:

  Old System New System
  AS level A level AS level A level
A* 140 56
A 60 120 20 48
B 50 100 16 40
C 40 80 12 32
D 30 60 10 24
E 20 40 6 16

Source, The Government Department for Education Performance Tables, January 2017
 

Exam results and League Tables2015 League Table2014 League Table2013 League Table2012 League Table

It is undeniable that examination results provide crucial data for judging the performance of schools. They are essential in appraising the achievements of privileged, private institutions, as well as those that are obtaining significant improvements with disadvantaged students. Exam results provide statistics that are used to create a variety of league tables, based either on the percentage of A*, A and B grades achieved by a school at A level or by the average grade achieved per examination. The former statistic arises from data collected by the ISC (the Independent Schools Council), which represents the great majority of private schools in the UK and collects information submitted voluntarily by schools. The latter statistic is calculated by the DfE (Department for Education) and is based on the results obtained directly from the exam boards and filtered to include only those students aged between 16 and 18.

League tables for A level are undoubtedly a useful resource for parents and students, and they provide a significant marketing tool for all schools, whether state or private. Who, after all, would not want to send their child to a school that enjoys a top ranking? Nonetheless, although this truth may appear to be self-evident, as with all statistics, league tables have to be interpreted with a certain degree of circumspection.

The first point to make is that schools often improve their results by rigorous, if not ruthless selection. There are probably few schools or colleges, whether comprehensive, grammar or private, that do not select students in some way or other. For highly sought-after private schools and grammar schools, this selection begins at entry for students aged between 11 and 13. The selection is based firstly on the results of admission tests (often the so-called Common Entrance Examination) and secondly, after shortlists are made from the test results, through individual interviews with each student.

Selection does not stop there, for if in the eyes of the school, a student underperforms at GCSE, they will not be permitted to move up to A level – to put it bluntly, they will be asked to leave. For state schools and colleges, underperforming GCSE students will be not be allowed to take up A levels but will be offered the choice of vocational qualifications such as NVQ or BTEC. Astonishingly, because the DfE league table is restricted to students between the ages of 16 and 18, a student who, for example, has to miss a year through illness, may not be allowed to return to the school because they would fall outside the 16 to 18 age range at the time of sitting their final A level exam. Outstanding schools can get away with such devices for improving their statistics, since it is easy for them to fill the vacancies that are created.

The data provided to the DfE may also be manipulated to improve a school’s performance. Underperforming students in their first year of A level may be asked to repeat the year or seek alternative academic accommodation. In the second year, if their performance is not up to snuff, they may simply not be allowed to sit the exams or they may be rusticated. This means that, although permitted to sit the exams at the school, they are registered as an ‘external’ candidate. In this way, the results of weaker students are prevented from showing up in the DfE statistics.

Finally, A level exams are now based on the results or four or more modules, which constitute the syllabus. To arrive at a final grade, the results for each module are processed and a final grade (A*, A, B etc) produced. This process is called ‘cashing in’. If it appears that any particular student’s results are going to pull the school’s average down, they may be excluded by instructing the exam board not to ‘cash in’ the grades.

The ‘grade inflation’ at A level that has occurred in recent years may be explained in part by this manipulation of results. Amusingly, this might remind one of Gresham’s Law in economics (‘bad currency drives out good currency’) in reverse; in the case of exam results it appears that good grades drive out bad grades.

As mentioned previously, the ISC (Independent Schools Council) produces a table of the exam results of all of its members. However, like the DfE table, this must be treated with a moderate degree of caution. The ISC relies on each of its members to submit results that are comprehensive, complete and accurate, but submission is not compulsory, and indeed some distinguished institutions (notably St Paul’s Boys School in London and King’s College Canterbury) decline.

It is probably safe to say that, except for the strongest schools, failure to appear in a league table is a sign of weakness rather than strength. Anyone scanning a league table might reasonably ask why a school was not present or, if the table is limited to, say, the top hundred schools, note that the school was not among the ‘best’. It would also be wrong to think that schools themselves do not place emphasis on exam results. Even schools that rightly stress the other merits of the education they provide, are quick to point out in their publicity that they achieve outstanding exam results in addition to all the other benefits gained by their students.

Conversely, no school would wish to embarrass itself with a poor showing in exams: schools compete for students, and exam results are an important factor in making a choice. It must be said, therefore, that those schools that take a pragmatic approach to the publication of exam results disadvantage others that behave completely honourably in this regard. To level the playing field in this arena would not be easy, but to avoid the attempt undermines an ideal of education, namely the pursuit of truth.

College
Points Per Candidate
Avg Points Per Exam

Bellerbys London

997.5

259.1

Cambridge Tutors

914.4

242.8

Ashbourne College

801.4

240.8

Brampton College

792.3

248.8

Fine Arts

778.3

229.8

Ealing Independent

742.5

223.5

Chelsea Independent

737.9

220

Duff Miller

704.8

219.3

MPW London

700.7

228

David Game

682.8

208.5

DLD College

651

230

CATS College

610

207.5

Lansdowne College

609

194.3

Collingham

594.2

207.2

Bales College

489.2

167.4

Abbey College London

No Data

No Data

A* = 300 points, A = 270, etc
AS results are weighted 50% of A levels; eg A* = 150 points
Average points = Total points / number of exams taken
Table excludes candidates who were 19 or older at the beginning of the academic year, Sept 1 2011
Source, The Government Department for Education Performance Tables, January 2016

College
Points Per Candidate
Avg Points Per Exam

Cambridge Tutors

938.4

239.5

Ashbourne A Level College, London

858.2

245.9

Bellerbys London

828.8

238.5

Brampton Colege

795.1

252.0

Ealing Independent

782.1

223.5

Fine Arts

766.9

232.3

Duff Miller

759.1

221.2

David Game

728.3

216.2

MPW London

725.2

229.0

Chelsea Independent

707.2

208.6

DLD College

624.0

223.8

Collingham

599.0

217.2

CATS College

597.0

202.9

Lansdowne College

588.9

216.7

Bales College

275.5

87.8

Abbey College London

No Data

No Data

A* = 300 points, A = 270, etc
AS results are weighted 50% of A levels; eg A* = 150 points
Average points = Total points / number of exams taken
Table excludes candidates who were 19 or older at the beginning of the academic year, Sept 1 2011
Source, The Government Department for Education Performance Tables, February 2015

For the first time this year, the tables also show the number of students who gain good grades – at least two As and a B – in so-called “facilitating subjects”. These are subjects that are commonly seen as a route into leading Russell Group universities.

The measure reflects achievement in maths and further maths, English literature, physics, biology, chemistry, geography, history and modern and classical languages.

Examination results are essential in appraising the achievements of private institutions, as well as those obtaining significant improvements with disadvantaged students. A level league tables are a useful resource and they provide a significant marketing tool for all schools. There are few schools, whether comprehensive, grammar or private, that do not select students in some way or other. For private schools and grammar schools, this selection begins at entry for students aged between 11 and 13. For state schools, under-performing GCSE students will be not be allowed to take up A levels but will be offered the choice of vocational qualifications such as NVQ or BTEC. Ashbourne Independent Sixth Form College, one of the best colleges in London, offers two year A level, 18 month A level and a one-year intensive A Level course programme, providing a wide range of subject choices.

 

College
Points Per Candidate
Avg Points Per Exam

Bellerbys London

965.2

241.3

Cambridge Tutors

894.2

246.5

Ashbourne A Level College, London

832.4

242.3

David Game

825.5

241.8

Fine Arts

800.1

231.3

Duff Miller

782.3

235.2

Brampton College

781.2

248.4

Ealing Independent

761.2

219.2

CATS College

744.2

233.1

Chelsea Independent

712.5

238.8

MPW London

711.7

224.1

Abbey College London

680.8

229.9

Collingham

642.1

228.2

DLD

640.8

223.6

Lansdowne College

616.1

218.5

Bales College

521.3

173.8

A* = 300 points, A = 270, etc
AS results are weighted 50% of A levels; eg A* = 150 points
Average points = Total points / number of exams taken
Table excludes candidates who were 19 or older at the beginning of the academic year, Sept 1 2011
Source, The Government Department for Education Performance Tables, February 2013

For the first time this year, the tables also show the number of students who gain good grades – at least two As and a B – in so-called “facilitating subjects”. These are subjects that are commonly seen as a route into leading Russell Group universities.

The measure reflects achievement in maths and further maths, English literature, physics, biology, chemistry, geography, history and modern and classical languages.

Examination results are essential in appraising the achievements of private institutions, as well as those obtaining significant improvements with disadvantaged students. A level league tables are a useful resource and they provide a significant marketing tool for all schools. There are few schools, whether comprehensive, grammar or private, that do not select students in some way or other. For private schools and grammar schools, this selection begins at entry for students aged between 11 and 13. For state schools, under-performing GCSE students will be not be allowed to take up A levels but will be offered the choice of vocational qualifications such as NVQ or BTEC. Ashbourne Independent Sixth Form College, one of the best colleges in London, offers two year A level, 18 month A level and a one-year intensive A Level course programme, providing a wide range of subject choices.

 

College
Points Per Candidate
Avg Points Per Exam
Percentage Achieving Academic A Levels

Bellerbys London

978.7

247.5

23%

Cambridge Tutors

929.3

250

26%

Ashbourne A Level College, London

824.2

239.1

21%

Ealing Independent

819.2

234.1

13%

Brampton College

816.1

251.5

29%

David Game

803.1

237.4

10%

Abbey College London

778.7

224.4

24%

Chelsea Independent

763.5

237.4

14%

MPW London

752.9

227

11%

Fine Arts

746.7

231.9

Duff Miller

746.7

231.9

14%

Collingham

683.2

220.8

4%

DLD

621

229.4

6%

Lansdowne College

596.3

214.9

3%

Cats College

542.8

222.7

Bales College

497.5

157.1

8%

A* = 300 points, A = 270, etc
AS results are weighted 50% of A levels; eg A* = 150 points
Average points = Total points / number of exams taken
Table excludes candidates who were 19 or older at the beginning of the academic year, Sept 1 2011
Source, The Government Department for Education Performance Tables, February 2013

For the first time this year, the tables also show the number of students who gain good grades – at least two As and a B – in so-called “facilitating subjects”. These are subjects that are commonly seen as a route into leading Russell Group universities.

The measure reflects achievement in maths and further maths, English literature, physics, biology, chemistry, geography, history and modern and classical languages.

Examination results are essential in appraising the achievements of private institutions, as well as those obtaining significant improvements with disadvantaged students. A level league tables are a useful resource and they provide a significant marketing tool for all schools. There are few schools, whether comprehensive, grammar or private, that do not select students in some way or other. For private schools and grammar schools, this selection begins at entry for students aged between 11 and 13. For state schools, under-performing GCSE students will be not be allowed to take up A levels but will be offered the choice of vocational qualifications such as NVQ or BTEC. Ashbourne Independent Sixth Form College, one of the best colleges in London, offers two year A level, 18 month A level and a one-year intensive A Level course programme, providing a wide range of subject choices.