Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures

Policy Contents

  1. Policy statement and aims
  2. The Designated Safeguarding Lead
  3. Duty of staff, Directors and volunteers
  4. Procedures
  5. Secure College premises
  6. Confidentiality and information sharing
  7. Monitoring and review
  8. Relevant Safeguarding Contacts.

Appendix 1: The Designated Safeguarding Lead
Appendix 2: Types and signs of abuse
Appendix 3: Guidance for staff and volunteers on suspecting or hearing a complaint of abuse.
Appendix 4: Whistleblowing Procedures: Dealing with allegations against members of staff, the Principal Directors or volunteers
Appendix 5: Role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director

 

Designated Safeguarding Lead

Fran Burns

Email frances.burns@ashbournecollege.co.uk
Tel: 0207 937 3858
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead

Lee Kirby

Sean Pillai

Ruchi Agarwa

 

 

Email lee.kirby@ashbournecollege.co.uk
Tel: 0207 937 3858 Ext 227

Email sean.pillai@ashbournecollege.co.uk

Email ruchi.agarwal@ashbournecollege.co.uk

Principal

Mike Kirby

Email mike.kirby@ashbournecollege.co.uk
Tel: 0207 937 3858 Ext 232
Chair

 Stephen Chang

Email stephen@changclan.com
Tel:  +44 (0) 7785 732 428
Nominated Safeguarding Director

Stephen Chang

Email : Stephen@changclan.com
Tel: +44 (0) 7785 732 428

Purpose of the Policy 

This policy states the responsibilities of the College in relation to Safeguarding children and vulnerable adults, in response to current legislation and guidance, with particular reference to Keeping Children Safe in Education (September 2016), Working Together To Safeguard Children (March 2015) and the London Child Protection Guidelines (Updated 2017).

Scope of the Policy 

The policy and procedures applies to all students, staff, providers of services to the College including volunteers and contractors, and all other users of the College and all College activities. The policy and procedures are intended to safeguard all of the College’s students and provide for the College to discharge its legislative obligations to protect students under the age of 18 years and vulnerable adults.

In terms of this policy, ‘child’ or ‘children’ means those under the age of 18 as defined by the Children Act of 1989 who are attending a course at the college. 

An adult who is vulnerable is a person aged 18 years or over who may be in need of community care services by reason of mental or other disability, age or illness; and who is or may be unable to take care of him or herself, or unable to protect him or herself against significant harm or exploitation’ (Department of Health, 2000).

Definitions and Guidelines 

In relation to children and young people, safeguarding and promoting their welfare is defined in ‘Working together to safeguard children’ as:  protecting children from maltreatment  preventing impairment of children’s health or development  ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care  taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes.

In relation to adults, there is a different legislative and policy base for responding to their safeguarding needs. However, most of the principles and procedures that apply are the same as those for safeguarding children and young people.

All college staff members should be aware of the signs of abuse and neglect so that they are able to identify cases of children who may be in need of help or protection.

Staff members working with children are advised to maintain an attitude of ‘it could happen here’ where Safeguarding is concerned. When concerned about the welfare of a child, staff members should always act in the interests of the child. There are various expert sources of advice on the signs of abuse and neglect. Knowing what to look for is vital to the early identification of abuse and neglect. If staff members are unsure they should always speak to children’s social care. A child going missing from an education setting is a potential indicator of abuse or neglect. School and college staff members should follow their procedures for dealing with children who go missing, particularly on repeat occasions. They should act to identify any risk of abuse and neglect, including sexual abuse or exploitation.

If the College receives information about an adult student (18 plus) which suggests that he/she has been abused or that it is likely, it has a duty to refer these concerns to Adult Services and/or the Police. If the College is unsure whether a referral is necessary, staff will consult with appropriate agencies, which is usually Adult Care Services.

Throughout this document the following definitions apply:

Child – in accordance with The Children Act 1989, (and also in the Children Act 2004) and therefore in accordance with the law, the College shall regard any learner below the age of 18 as a child.

Young people aged 18+ – may in some circumstances be regarded as vulnerable as a consequence of earlier life-experience and may therefore fall within the remit of The Children Act 1989. The College will take action based on individual situations; for example, where a learner is over 18 but wishes to report abuse which took place when they were younger or if there are younger siblings in a family who are thought to be at risk.

Vulnerable Adult – is or may be in need of Community Care Services by reason of mental or other disability, age or illness and is, or may be, unable to take care of himself or herself, or unable to protect himself or herself against significant harm or serious exploitation. Vulnerability can apply to a wide range of disabilities and situations including those adults at risk owing to their caring role or family responsibilities. Vulnerability may be temporary or permanent. Individuals can become vulnerable when no previous conditions existed, for example if they become ill.

Abuse – may be physical, sexual, emotional, neglect, domestic violence, financial, institutional or discriminatory. Abuse is behaviour which deliberately or unknowingly causes harm. Abuse can passive i.e. failure to care for someone, take action or alert about abuse. Abuse can be an isolated event or repeated. Significant harm – ill treatment or the impairment of health or development compared with the health or development which might be expected of a similar child.

Physical abuse – actual or likely physical injury, or failure to prevent injury. May involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning, scalding, drowning, suffocating, slapping, pushing, kicking, rough handling or unnecessary physical force, either deliberate or unintentional, misuse of medication, restraint or inappropriate sanctions or otherwise causing physical harm. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer feigns symptoms of, or deliberately causes, ill health to a child they are looking after.

Sexual abuse – Involving forcing or enticement to take part in sexual activities, including prostitution, whether or not the individual is aware of what is happening. Activities may involve physical contact including penetration or non-penetrative acts. For example it could include a child/vulnerable adult looking at or being involved in the production of/watching sexual online images, or watching sexual activities, or encouragement to behave in sexually inappropriate ways and can include grooming in preparation for abuse.

Many young people who are victims of sexual abuse do not recognise themselves as such. They may not understand what is happening or even understand that it is wrong. It is recognised that sexual abuse can take place within a relationship whether heterosexual or same sex, or outside of a relationship. It can include rape and sexual assault or sexual acts to which a vulnerable adult/child has not consented, could not consent to or was pressured into consenting to. This may also include the use of new technologies, for example ‘Youth Produced Sexual Imagery’ (see below). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males; women and children can commit acts of sexual abuse too.

Sexual exploitation of children and young people under 18 involves exploitative situations, contexts or relationships where young people (or a third person/s) receive ‘something’: (e.g. accommodation, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, food, affection, gifts, money) as a result of them performing, and/or another/others performing sexual activities on them. Child sexual exploitation can occur through the use of technology without the child’s immediate recognition; e.g. being persuaded to post sexual images on the Internet or send photos by text without immediate payment or gain. In all cases, those exploiting the child/young person have power over them by virtue of their age, gender, intellect, physical strength and/or economic or other resources. Violence, coercion and intimidation are common, involvement in exploitative relationships often being characterised by the child or young person’s limited availability of choice resulting from their social/economic and/or emotional vulnerability.

Teenage relationship abuse – Teenage relationship abuse is a pattern of actual or threatened acts of physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse, perpetrated by an adolescent (between the ages of 13 and 18) against a current or former partner. Abuse may include insults, coercion, social sabotage, sexual harassment, threats and/or acts of physical or sexual abuse. The abusive teen uses this pattern of violent and coercive behaviour, in a heterosexual or same gender relationship, in order to gain power and maintain control over the partner. This abuse may be child sexual exploitation.

Youth Produced Sexual Imagery (Formally known as ‘Sexting’) – generally refers to the sending of sexually explicit images via text, email, or through social networking sites. For example, this could be a photograph of a young woman in a state of undress or a boy exposing himself. Youth produced sexual imagery is commonplace amongst young people. Many young people do not see youth produced sexual imagery as a problem and are often reluctant to talk to adults about it because they are afraid of being judged or having their phones taken away. It may be common but youth produced sexual imagery is illegal. By sending an explicit image, a young person is producing and distributing child abuse images and risks being prosecuted, even if the picture is taken and shared with their permission. Young people (under 18) texting intimate pictures of themselves via social media are committing a criminal offence (distribution of child pornography) and can face police action, even if their actions are entirely voluntary.

Emotional abuse – emotional abuse is the persistent emotional ill treatment as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the individual’s emotional development. It may involve conveying that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. Age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children, causing children frequently to feel frightened, or the exploitation or corruption of children will also constitute emotional abuse. This may also include overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or participating in normal social interaction. It can include seeing or hearing ill treatment of another person. It may include serious bullying, including cyber-bullying. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them, or making fun of what they say or how they communicate.

Psychological abuse – includes emotional abuse, threats of harm or abandonment, deprivation of contact, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion, harassment, verbal abuse or isolation.

Neglect – neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child or vulnerable adult’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of their health or development such as failing to provide adequate food, shelter and clothing, medical care or treatment or neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, their basic emotional/physical needs. It can include not protecting them from emotional harm or danger. Neglect may include acts of omission such as ignoring or withholding medical or physical care needs, failure to provide access to appropriate health, social care or educational services, the withholding of the necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition, clothing and heating. Victims of neglect often suffer other types of abuse. Neglect may occur if a parent becomes physically or mentally unable to care for a child or where they have an addiction to alcohol or drugs, which could impair their ability to keep a child safe or result in them prioritising buying drugs, or alcohol, over food, clothing or warmth for the child. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal drug or alcohol abuse.

Self-neglect – is not a direct form of abuse but staff need to be aware of it in the general context of risk assessment/risk management and to be aware that they may owe a duty of care to a vulnerable individual who places him/herself at risk in this way. Risk to self and/or others – This may include but is not exclusive to self-harm, suicidal tendencies or potential risk of harming others, which may or may not include children. This may be as a consequence of an individual experiencing a significant level of personal, emotional trauma and/or stress and mental health issues.

Domestic Violence – also known as domestic abuse, is defined as: “An incident or a pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive, threatening behaviour, violence or abuse. It concerns people aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate partners or family members and it can happen regardless of a person’s gender or sexuality”. [Home Office: 24th March 2015 Domestic Violence] Domestic violence can include, but is not limited to, the following types of abuse: psychological, emotional, physical, sexual and financial. It also includes what is known as ‘honour’ based violence, female genital mutilation (FGM) and forced marriage (see below). Domestic violence affects people of every class, gender, wealth, geography, age, race, disability and sexuality. The violence can begin at any stage of a relationship and may continue after a relationship has ended. Domestic violence is a pattern of controlling and aggressive behaviour that is intentional and calculated to exercise power and control within a relationship. If a student discloses they are in an abusive relationship, we have a duty to offer them support, and /or find the relevant organisation that may be able to help them. If the student is an adult it is important to establish if they have children under 18. If the victim does have young children a referral may need to be made to Children’s Social Care, ideally with consent from the parent.

Forced Marriage – where one or both people do not (or in cases of people with learning disabilities, cannot) consent to the marriage and pressure or abuse is used. Forced Marriage is different from, and should not be confused with, arranged marriage. A student who feels they are likely to be forced to marry someone they do not wish to marry is often experiencing some form of abuse such as physical, psychological, financial, sexual or emotional pressure e.g. being made to feel like they are bringing shame on their family. Confidentiality is extremely important in these circumstances. If there are concerns that a student is in danger of a forced marriage the Safeguarding team will follow government guidelines and will contact the Forced Marriage Unit. Forced marriage is illegal in the UK. The student’s family should not under any circumstances be contacted without consultation with the Safeguarding Officer and student.

Honour Based Violence – “a crime or incident which has or may have been committed to protect or defend the honour of the family and/or community” (Crown Prosecution Service). It is often linked to family members or acquaintances who mistakenly believe someone has brought shame to their family or community by doing something that is not in keeping with the traditions and beliefs of their culture. For example, honour based violence might be committed against people who:  want to get out of an arranged or forced marriage  become involved with a boyfriend or girlfriend from a different culture or religion  wear clothes or take part in activities that might not be considered traditional within a particular culture The term ‘honour based crime’ covers any criminal offence that is driven by a mistaken desire to protect the cultural or traditional beliefs of a family or community. It may or may not involve violence. It can include:  personal attacks of any kind, including physical and sexual violence  forced marriage  forced repatriation (sending someone back to their country of origin without their consent)  written or verbal threats or insults  threatening or abusive phone calls, emails and messages.

Female Genital Mutilation – FGM refers to procedures that intentionally alter or cause injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. FGM is usually carried out on young girls between infancy and the age of 15, most commonly before puberty starts. All staff have a duty to act to safeguard girls at risk of FGM. The risk to girls and young women increases where a relative has undergone FGM and victims are most likely to come from a community that is known to practice FGM. Girls at risk of FGM may not yet be aware of the practice or that it may happen to them, so sensitivity should always be shown when approaching the subject. FGM is illegal in the UK. It is also illegal to arrange for a child to be taken abroad for FGM. Staff need to remain vigilant when potentially vulnerable females report that they are going abroad or return from trips abroad, and should look out for signs such as uncomfortableness when sitting, or needing to use the toilet more frequently. If a teacher, in the course of their work, discovers that an act of FGM appears to have been carried out on a girl under the age of 18, the teacher must report this to the police. The safeguarding team will support them in making the referral. Note: Care should be taken not to approach the family or attempt to mediate if forced marriage, honour-based violence or FGM is suspected.

Radicalisation – vulnerable individuals being targeted for recruitment into extremism. Protecting individuals from the risk of radicalisation is similar in nature to protecting them from other forms of harm and abuse. There is no single way of identifying an individual who is likely to be susceptible to an extremist ideology. Specific factors may contribute to vulnerability which are often combined with influences such as family, friends or the internet, and with specific needs for which an extremist or terrorist group may appear to provide an answer. The internet and the use of social media in particular is a major factor in the radicalisation of young people. As with other safeguarding risks, staff should be alert to changes in behaviour which could indicate that they may be in need of help or protection. Staff should use their judgement in identifying children who might be at risk of radicalisation and act proportionately, which may include making a referral to the Prevent Team and Channel programme.

Discriminatory abuse– includes racism, sexism or discrimination based on a person’s disability. Financial or material abuse – includes theft, fraud, exploitation, pressure in connection with wills, property, enduring power of attorney, or inheritance or financial transactions, or the inappropriate use, misuse or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits. Safeguarding – includes promotion of health and well-being as well as protection of specific individuals.

CSE – Child Sexual Exploitation – Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse. It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexual activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) for the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator or facilitator. The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology.

(Based on the updated DFE definition February 2017.)

1. Policy statement

It is the responsibility of everyone within College to ensure the safety and wellbeing of our students. It is everyone’s responsibility to understand how to recognise, respond to, report, record and refer any concerns about the welfare of an individual student as appropriate.

Ashbourne College is committed to a positive policy of equal opportunity and strives to support students wherever possible and create an environment that is safe and welcoming to all students. The College recognises that it has a duty of care to students, staff and stakeholder and endeavours to ensure that their wellbeing and health and safety are a priority.

1.1 Ashbourne College’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures (the Policy) has regard to statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education (September 2016) and Working Together to Safeguard Children (March 2015) ‘What to do if you think a child is being abused’ (2015)
Information Sharing’ (2015)
and Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales (2016), and as reflected by directives laid out in APPENDIX 6 and:

1.1.1 has been authorised by the Directors of the College;

1.1.2 is published on the College website and available in hard copy to parents on request;

1.1.3 can be made available in large print or other accessible format if required; [• and]

1.1.4 its procedures apply to all staff, volunteers, students and visitors whilst on site, or wherever staff, visitors, students or volunteers are working with us even where this is away from the College, for example an educational visit.

1.2 The underlying ethos of this policy adheres not only to Government and all statutory requirements, but is underpinned by Ashbourne’s own value statement that “Students Come First.”

Every pupil should feel safe and protected from any form of abuse. To this end, the College is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. It is a direct aim of Ashbourne to create an environment where students are safe to learn and develop, to raise student awareness of safeguarding issues and equip them with the skills needed to keep them safe. This will be delivered through a varied and broad based curriculum, including Online training resources. At Ashbourne we consider it imperative that all students should feel listened to and supported .We will always act in the best interest of the child.

To fulfil our safeguarding duties, the College will take all reasonable measures to:

1.2.1 ensure that we practise safer recruitment in checking the suitability of staff and volunteers (including staff employed by another organisation) to work with children and young people in accordance with: the guidance given in Keeping Children Safe in Education (September 2016) and the Education (Independent College Standards) Regulations 2014. See also the College’s separate [Safer Recruitment Policy];

1.2.2 ensure that where staff from another organisation are working with our pupils on another site, we require written confirmation that appropriate safer recruitment checks and procedures have been completed on those staff;

1.2.3 follow the local inter-agency procedures of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Local Safeguarding Children Board;

1.2.4 be alert to signs of abuse both in the College and from outside and to protect each pupil from any form of abuse, whether from an adult or another pupil;

1.2.5 deal appropriately with every suspicion or complaint of abuse and to support children who have been abused in accordance with his / her agreed child protection plan;

1.2.6 design and operate procedures which, so far as possible, ensure that teachers and others who are innocent are not prejudiced by false allegations;

1.2.7 be alert to the needs of children with physical and mental health conditions;

1.2.8 operate robust and sensible health and safety procedures and operate clear and supportive policies on drugs, alcohol and substance misuse;

1.2.9 assess the risk of children or adults being drawn into terrorism, including support for extremist ideas that are part of terrorist ideology, based on an understanding of the potential risk in the local area;

1.2.10 identify children or adults who may be vulnerable to radicalisation, and know what to do when they are identified;

1.2.11 teach pupils about safeguarding, for example through use of online resources, through the curriculum and PSHE, together with guidance on adjusting behaviour to reduce risks including the safe use of electronic devices and the internet, building resilience to protect themselves and their peers, and information about who they should turn to for help (see also the College’s [• policy on the acceptable use of IT and e-safety]);

1.2.12 take all practicable steps to ensure that College premises are as secure as circumstances permit;

1.2.13 consider and develop procedures to deal with any other safeguarding issues which may be specific to individual children in the College or in the local area; and

1.2.14 have regard to regulations and standards issued by the Secretary of State for Education (DfE) in accordance with section 94 of the Education and Skills Act 2008 and sections 29 and 38 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 and associated regulations.

1.3. Keeping children safe in education defines safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children as protecting children from maltreatment; preventing impairment of children’s health or development; ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care; and taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes. The Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales emphasises that the duty to have due regard to the need to prevent children from being drawn into terrorism is an aspect of safeguarding. Being drawn into terrorism includes not just violent extremism but also non-violent extremism, which can create an atmosphere conducive to terrorism and can popularise views which terrorists exploit. Colleges should be safe spaces in which children and young people can understand and discuss sensitive topics, including terrorism and the extremist ideas that are part of terrorist ideology, and learn how to challenge these ideas.

1.4. Keeping children safe in education provides that the inspection of independent schools will ensure that the Independent School Standards which concerns the welfare, health and safety of children are met.

Implementation

The following demonstrates how Ashbourne Independent College implements the aforementioned guidance in practical terms.

Creating a Safe Environment: 

To create a safe environment for students Ashbourne College will:

  • Operate a ‘zero tolerance’ approach to weapons, drugs, alcohol and bullying, including cyber or electronic bullying, in all forms.
  • Have clear procedures for following up issues of conduct for both staff and students.
  • Continually review the safety and security in College though cross College groups e.g. Safeguarding Sub-Group.
  • Ensure all staff, including volunteers, have an appropriate DBS and other checks. All Staff, including frequent visitors, will receive a Safeguarding Induction.
  • Ensure all staff, students and visitors wear ID Badges at all times.
  • Implement Relevant Criminal Convictions Policy for all students.
  • Ensure all contractors receive a Contractor’s Pack including a DBS Matrix as well as the Colleges Safeguarding, Equality and Diversity and insurance requirements  Ensure that all contractors are required to wear ID badges at all times.

Provide training and support for staff:

All staff will be given regular and up to date information on Safeguarding through:

  • A clear induction programme, which includes Safeguarding systems and Policy, staff code of conduct and the role of the designated safeguarding lead;
  • Detailed and ongoing training which will be provided for staff with specific responsibility for student wellbeing e.g: Personal Tutors, Head of Faculties, Heads of Year and the Safeguarding Team.
  • Taking part in appropriate Safeguarding Training, in line with specific job roles;  Safeguarding and child protection updates (for example, via email, e-bulletins and staff meetings), as required, but at least annually;
  • Being made aware of the Colleges Policy and Procedures on Safeguarding;
  • Being offered other relevant suitable training / information, as and when appropriate e.g. PREVENT training and awareness of national and local initiatives;
  • Providing staff with external counselling / supervision where appropriate;
  • Ensuring all governors and staff, including sub-contracted staff, have read at least Part One of Keeping children safe in education: Statutory guidance for schools and colleges (2016);
  • Briefings on the process for making referrals to children’s social care and for statutory assessments under the Children Act 19893 that may follow a referral, along with the role they might be expected to play in such assessments.

Positive Promotion

Safeguarding and welfare support, will be promoted positively throughout College in a number of ways, including:

  • Policies and Procedures available on the College website for whole College Community, e.g. students, staff, parents and guardians.
  • Monitoring of attendance on a daily basis.
  • Well being talks  including topics such as drug and alcohol awareness, sexual health and respect.
  • Student Induction.
  • Planned Awareness Weeks focusing on specific Safeguarding issues; eg Equality and Diversity Week  Health and Wellbeing, Anti Bullying, E-Safety promotion and information, including sexual health and drugs and alcohol awareness throughout the academic year.
  • Ensuring Safeguarding is included within the remit and training of the Student Council.
  • Information awareness raising days which are responsive to local and national trends.
  • Student Guide (Student Induction/Information Leaflet)  Awareness-raising posters and internal information screens, (IIS) media resources.
  • External agencies partnerships; eg The Haven, (Healthy Relationships Guidance) Frank and Insight KC  (Drug awareness Guidance.) CEOPS and others as required.

Students will be offered support through a number of mechanisms including:

  • Safeguarding Officers who will deliver timely interventions or appropriate support to our most vulnerable learners.
  • Early Intervention Strategy – including ‘Team Around The Student’ meetings.
  • Referral to the approved College Counsellor.
  • Referral to the Resilience Programme.
  • Learning Support for students with learning difficulties / disabilities and / or medical needs
  • Counselling services-  Links developed with external agencies, including agencies linked to specific groups such as Looked After Children (LAC) (including those leaving care), Mental Health Services, Youth Offending Service (YOS) etc. The best outcomes for children and vulnerable adults are achieved by adopting a multi-agency approach, where professionals work effectively in partnership.
  • Measures to support students and staff at risk of being drawn into radicalisation  Considering the needs of the individual and responding as far as possible
  • Relevant Criminal Conviction (RCC) Risk Assessments – new / re-enrolling applicants
  • Exceptional Review Risk Assessments
  • Identification of young people who may benefit from early help. This means providing support as soon as a problem emerges at any point in a child’s life, with support from other agencies and professionals in an early help assessment.

Equality and diversity statement

Ashbourne Independent Sixth Form is committed to the promotion and development of equality and diversity. We aim to provide a working and learning environment which values individuals equally and does not discriminate on any grounds including age, disability, race, sex (gender), sexual orientation, gender reassignment, religion or belief, marriage or civil partnership and pregnancy and maternity.

This policy and procedure will be implemented in accordance with our policy on equality and diversity, and decisions/actions taken in relation to a potential safeguarding or child protection incident will not be influenced by the background or situation of any persons involved. Each case will be dealt with on its own merits.

This policy is subject to equality impact analysis.

1.5 Related policies

1.5.1 The following policies and procedures are also relevant to the College’s safeguarding practices:

(a) [• Staff Code of Conduct]

(b) [• Whistleblowing Policy]

(c) [• Safer Recruitment Policy]

(d) [• Anti-bullying Policy]

(e) [• E-safety and Acceptable Use of ICT Policy]

(f) [• Missing Pupil Policy]

(g) [• Policy on the administration of medicines and supporting pupils with medical conditions]

(h) [• Policy on behaviour and attendance] 

(i) [  Risk Assessment Policy for Pupil Welfare ]

Designated staff with responsibility for safeguarding

2.The Designated Safeguarding Lead

2.1. The College’s Directors have appointed a member of staff of the College’s senior leadership team with the necessary status and authority (Designated Safeguarding Lead / DSL) to be responsible for matters relating to child protection and welfare.

2.2. The Designated Safeguarding Lead shall be given the time, funding, training, resources and support to enable him/her to support other staff on safeguarding matters, to contribute to strategy discussions and/or inter-agency meetings and to contribute to the assessment of children.

2.3. Parents are welcome to approach the Designated Safeguarding Lead if they have any concerns about the welfare of any child in the College. If preferred, parents may discuss concerns in private with the child’s personal tutor or the Principal who will notify the Designated Safeguarding Lead in accordance with these procedures.

2.4. The name and contact details of the Designated Safeguarding Lead are set out in the College Contacts list at the front of this Policy. They, together with the main responsibilities of the Designated Safeguarding Lead, are also set out in Appendix 1.

2.5. If the Designated Safeguarding Lead is unavailable his / her duties will be carried out by the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead. The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead ‘s details are also set out in the College Contacts list and in Appendix 1. In this Policy, reference to the Designated Safeguarding Lead includes the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead where the Designated Safeguarding Lead is unavailable.

3. Duty of staff, Directors and volunteers

3.1. All staff, Directors and volunteers of the College are under a general legal duty:

3.1.1 to protect children from abuse and safeguard and promote their welfare;

3.1.2 to be aware of the terms and procedures in this Policy and to follow them;

3.1.3 to know how to access and implement the procedures in this Policy, independently if necessary;

3.1.4 to make a sufficient record of any significant complaint, conversation or event in accordance with this Policy; and

3.1.5 to report any matters of concern to the Designated Safeguarding Lead.

3.2 The Directors ensure that the College’s safeguarding arrangements take into account the procedures and practice of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board. The Directors have nominated one of its members to take leadership of the College’s safeguarding arrangements on behalf of the Board and to liaise with external agencies where this is required, including in the event of allegations of abuse made against the Principal or a member of the Board of Directors. The Nominated Safeguarding Director is Stephen Chang. See the roles and responsibilities of the Nominated Safeguarding Director set out in Appendix 5.

3.3 The Directors and College leaders will ensure mechanisms are in place to enable staff and visitors / volunteers to understand their responsibilities for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of pupils, as described in Keeping children safe in education (2016). This will include monitoring the College’s data to ascertain whether the policy and procedures are effective, whether concerns are raised appropriately and in timely manner, the impact of Child Protection / safeguarding training, etc.

3.4 The Directors and college leaders are dedicated to ensuring children are taught about safeguarding, including online, through teaching and learning opportunities, as part of providing a broad and balanced curriculum and through informal curricular activities. In particular, we teach pupils how to:

  • recognise and manage risks in different situations and then decide how to behave responsibly
  • understand healthy and unhealthy relationships and issues of choice and consent;
  • judge what kind of physical contact is acceptable and unacceptable
  • recognise when pressure from others (including people they know) threatens their personal safety and wellbeing and develop effective ways of resisting peer pressure.

We recognise that children with SEN or disabilities may be at increased risk of abuse; we endeavour to make the safeguarding curriculum accessible to all our pupils.

3.5 Training

3.5.1 Induction

(a) All staff, including temporary staff and volunteers, will be provided with induction training that includes:

(i) this Policy;

(ii) the staff Code of Conduct including the Whistleblowing procedure;

(iii) the role of the Designated Safeguarding Lead and his / her identity and contact details together with that of and his / her Deputy;

(iv) child protection training in accordance with RBKC Safeguarding Children Board procedures; and

(v) a copy of Part 1 of Keeping children safe in education and, if in direct contact with pupils, annex A.

3.5.2 Child protection training

(a) All staff including the Principal will receive a copy of this policy and Part 1 and annex A of Keeping children safe in education 2016, and will be required to confirm that they have read these. Training will be provided to support staff understanding of their Safeguarding responsibilities and identifying key indicators of abuse.

(b) The Principal and all staff members will undertake appropriate child protection training which will be updated every year and following consultation with the RBKC Local Safeguarding Children Board. Training will include guidance on the duties of staff in relation to both children in need and children at risk of harm.

(c) Staff development training will also include training on online safety.

(d) The Nominated Safeguarding Director and the Chair will receive appropriate training to enable them to fulfil their safeguarding responsibilities, as set out in Appendices 5 and 6.

3.5.3 Designated Safeguarding Lead

(a) The Designated Safeguarding Lead and Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead have undertaken child protection training and training in inter-agency working, and will attend refresher training at two-yearly intervals, with regular updates at least annually. For further details about the training of the Designated Safeguarding Lead, see Appendix 1.

(b) All training will be carried out in accordance with Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board procedures. Prevent duty training will be consistent with Home Office advice

4. Procedures

4.1 Concerns about abuse

4.1.1 Every concern or suspicion of abuse from within or outside the College will be taken seriously and action taken in accordance with this policy.

4.1.2 The child protection training provided to staff considers the types and signs of abuse staff should be aware of. Further details are set out in Appendix 2.

4.1.3 If a member of staff is concerned that a pupil may be at risk of, or suffering, harm, the matter should be referred to the Designated Safeguarding Lead without delay. If a member of staff suspects abuse or receives a disclosure, the procedures set out in Appendix 3 must be followed. See paragraph 4.3 and Appendix 4 for the procedures for dealing with allegations against staff and volunteers.

4.1.4 If, at any point, there is a risk of immediate serious harm to a child a referral should be made to children’s social care immediately. Anybody can make a referral. If the child’s situation does not appear to be improving the staff member with concerns should press for re-consideration.

4.1.5 All staff should understand what to do if they have a concern about a child (as opposed to believing the child to be in danger or at immediate risk of harm). College staff are well placed to identify children who would benefit from ‘early help’ and should understand that they may be asked to contribute to any assessments.

4.2 Action by the Designated Safeguarding Lead

4.2.1 On being notified of a disclosure or suspicion of abuse, the action to be taken by the Designated Safeguarding Lead will take into account:

(a) The local inter-agency procedures of the RBKC Local Safeguarding Children Board;

(b) where relevant, local information sharing protocols relating to Channel referrals;

(c) the nature and seriousness of the suspicion or concern. A complaint involving a serious criminal offence, including the identification of someone who may already be engaged in illegal terrorist-related activity, will always be referred to children’s social care and, if appropriate, the police;

(d) the child’s wishes or feelings; and

(e) duties of confidentiality, so far as applicable.

4.2.2 Generally, a decision to make a child protection (s47) referral to children’s social care will be discussed with the pupil and their parents / carers unless it is believed that to do so would place the child at increased risk of harm.

4.2.3 If there is room for doubt as to whether a referral should be made, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will consult with children’s social care on a no names basis without identifying the family. However, as soon as sufficient concern exists that a child may be at risk of significant harm, a s47 referral to children’s social care will be made without delay (and in any event within 24 hours).

4.2.4 If the initial referral is made by telephone, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will confirm the referral in writing to children’s social care within 24 hours. If no response or acknowledgment is received within one working day, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will contact children’s social care again.

4.2.5 In circumstances where a pupil has not suffered and is not likely to suffer significant harm but is in need of additional support from one or more agencies, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will liaise with children’s social care and/or children’s services and where appropriate a child in need (s17) inter-agency assessment will take place, including use of the Common Assessment Framework / Early Help or Team around the Child approaches, as necessary. Decisions to seek such support for a pupil will be taken in consultation with the pupil and, where appropriate, the parents.

4.2.6 Where relevant, the College will co-operate with the Channel panel and the police in providing any relevant information so that each can effectively carry out its functions to determine whether an individual is vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism. The College will respond to requests for information from the police promptly and in any event within five to ten working days.

4.3 Dealing with allegations against staff, Directors and volunteers

4.3.1 The College has procedures for dealing with allegations against staff, Directors and volunteers who work with children that aim to strike a balance between the need to protect children from abuse and the need to protect staff and volunteers from malicious, false or unfounded allegations. These procedures are set out in Appendix 4 and follow Part 4 of Keeping children safe in education 2016.

4.3.2 The local authority has designated a particular officer, or team of officers, to be involved in the management and oversight of allegations against people that work with children (designated officer(s)). The designated officer(s) will be informed immediately and in any event within one working day of all allegations against staff, Directors and volunteers that come to the College’s attention and appear to meet the criteria set out in paragraph 1 of Appendix 4.

4.3.3 Detailed guidance is given to staff and volunteers to ensure that their behaviour and actions do not place pupils or themselves at risk of harm or of allegations of harm to a pupil. This guidance is contained in the Staff Manual / Code of Conduct – which is available on the Ashbourne Website and includes detail of additional safeguarding arrangements where staff engage in one-to-one teaching and meetings with pupils.

4.3.4 Staff and volunteers should also feel able to follow the College’s separate Whistleblowing Policy to raise concerns about poor or unsafe safeguarding practices at the College, potential failures by the College or its staff to properly safeguard the welfare of pupils or other wrongdoing in the workplace that does not involve the safeguarding and welfare of children.

4.3.5 If a staff member feels unable to raise their concerns in line with the College Whistleblowing Policy, they may instead contact a dedicated helpline hosted by the NSPCC:

NSPCC WHISTLEBLOWING HELPLINE NUMBER: 0800 028 0285

4.4 Allegations of peer on peer abuse

4.4.1 We recognise that pupils may be harmed by other young people, including other pupils of our college. They may be harmed by:

  • Bullying / cyber-bullying
  • Inappropriate or harmful sexualised behaviour
  • Gender-based violence (eg. boys experiencing initiation / hazing, girls experiencing violence from boys)
  • Grooming, either for sexual abuse, exploitation or extremism
  • Child sexual exploitation

4.4.2 We minimise the risk of peer on peer abuse in a number of ways, including through the formal and informal curriculum (PSHE, SMSC, etc) and existing policies such as our behaviour, anti-bullying and online safety / acceptable use policies.

4.4.3 Allegations against pupils should be reported in accordance with the procedures set out in this Policy. A pupil against whom a serious allegation of abuse has been made may be suspended from the College during the investigation and the College’s policy on behaviour, discipline and sanctions will apply.

4.4.4 The College will take advice from children’s social care, police and/or Channel as appropriate on the investigation of such allegations and will take all appropriate action to ensure the safety and welfare of all pupils involved including the pupil or pupils accused of abuse.

4.4.5 If it is necessary for a pupil to be interviewed by the police in relation to allegations of abuse, the College will ensure that, subject to the advice of children’s social care, the pupil’s parents are informed as soon as possible and that the pupil is supported during the interview by an appropriate adult. [• In the case of pupils whose parents are abroad, the pupil’s Education Guardian will be requested to provide support to the pupil and to accommodate [● him / her / them] if it is necessary to suspend [● him / her / them] during the investigation.]

4.4.6 Where an allegation of sexual abuse, exploitation or grooming is made against a pupil, both the victim and the alleged perpetrator will be treated as being at risk and safeguarding procedures in accordance with this Policy will be followed.

4.5 Missing child and children missing from education procedures

4.5.1 Missing Child

(a) All staff are informed of the separate procedure to be used for searching for, and if necessary, reporting, any pupil missing from College. The procedure includes the requirement to record any incident, the action taken and the reasons given by the pupil for being missing.

(b) Please see the College’s separate Missing Pupil Policy for further details.

4.5.2 Children Missing from Education

(a) In line with the Pupil (Registration) Regs 2016, the College shall inform the local authority (within which the College is sited) of any pupil who is going to be deleted in-year from the admission register for any of the 15 reasons listed in the Regulations. If relevant, we will also inform the local authority in which the pupil normally resides. :

(b) The local authority must be notified as soon as the grounds for deletion are met, but no later than deleting the pupil’s name from the register. This will assist the local authority to:

(i) fulfil its duty to identify children of compulsory school age who are missing education,

(ii) where applicable, liaise with the local authority where the pupil normally resides; and

(iii) follow up with any child who might be in danger of not receiving an education and who might be at risk of abuse or neglect.

4.5.3 The College shall inform the applicable local authority of any pupil of compulsory school age who fails to attend College regularly, or has been absent without the College’s permission for a continuous period of 10 College days or more, at such intervals as are agreed between the College and the local authority (or in default of such agreement, at intervals determined by the Secretary of State).

4.6 Informing parents

4.6.1 Parents will normally be kept informed as appropriate of any action to be taken under these procedures. However, there may be circumstances when the Designated Safeguarding Lead will need to consult the Principal, the designated officer, children’s social care and / or the police before discussing details with parents.

4.6.2 However, as pupils get older, legislation recognises their right to make decisions about their own information and to express their wishes and preferences. If a pupil requests that their parent/carer is not informed of action to be taken under these procedures we will consider their request within the following confines:

  • Whether informing parents would put the child at increased risk of harm
  • Whether not informing parents would place the child at increased risk of harm
  • Whether the pupil has the capacity to understand the decision they are making
  • Whether any other child(ren) may be at risk of harm due to the information available to us
  • Whether there is sufficient cause to override the pupil’s wishes in the public interest.

4.6.3 In relation to Channel referrals, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will consider seeking the consent of the pupil (or their parent/guardian) when determining what information can be shared. Whether or not consent is sought will be dependent on the circumstances of the case but may relate to issues such as the health of the individual, law enforcement or protection of the public.

4.6.4 See also section 3 of Appendix 4 for details about the disclosure of information where an allegation has been made against a member of staff, volunteer or the Principal of the College.

5. Secure College premises

5.1 The College will take all practicable steps to ensure that College premises are as secure as circumstances permit.

5.2 All College sites have a coded entry system and all entrances are secured by camera coverage, monitored by front desk staff at each site. Each College site has its own dedicated Reception / Front Desk area. The College keeps a visitors book at Reception. All visitors must sign in on arrival and sign out on departure and are escorted whilst on College premises by a member of staff or appropriately vetted volunteer. All visitors will be given a name badge with the title ‘Visitor’ which must be clearly displayed and worn at all times whilst on the College premises.

6. Confidentiality, record keeping and information sharing

6.1 Keeping children safe in education (2016) makes clear that fears about sharing information cannot be allowed to stand in the way of the need to promote the welfare and protect the safety of children: “No single professional can have a full picture of a child’s needs – everyone who comes into contact with them has a role to play in identifying concerns, sharing information and taking prompt action”

6.2 The College will keep all child protection records confidential, allowing disclosure only to those who need the information in order to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. A record will be made of who has viewed a child’s CP record, when and for what reason – this will be recorded on the child’s chronology

6.3 Where the pupil remains with us until the end of their schooling, child protection files are retained in line with national guidance:

  • If a referral has been made to children’s social care and/or the pupil was ever subject to a s47 child protection plan or other multi-agency plan, the records will be kept for 35 years
  • If no referral was made and/or there has been no multi-agency intervention, the record will be kept until the end of the academic year of their 25th birthday

6.4 Where a pupil leaves us to attend another school or FE college, the CP records will be passed to the Designated Safeguarding Lead of the new setting without delay. Wherever possible, this will be by face to face handover; if that is not possible, we will notify the new DSL that a file exists and will send the file by secure mail with confirmation of delivery.

6.5 If a CP record is to be transferred to a new setting we do not retain a copy of the record (except the chronology); the only exception would be where a CP file is being transferred by mail in which case we will retain a photocopy until receipt by the new setting is confirmed.

6.6 The College will co-operate with police and children’s social care to ensure that all relevant information is shared for the purposes of child protection investigations under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 in accordance with the requirements of Working together to safeguard children (March 2015), the Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales (2015) and Channel Duty Guidance: Protecting vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorism (2015).

6.7 Where allegations have been made against staff, the College will consult with the designated officer and, where appropriate, the police and children’s social care to agree the information that should be disclosed and to whom.

6.8 Records of an allegation against a member of staff will be retained until normal pension age or for 10 years, whichever is the longer. The only exception to this is where the allegation has been shown to be malicious, in which case all records of the allegation will be deleted.

 7. Monitoring and review

7. 1 The Designated Safeguarding Lead will ensure that the procedures set out in this Policy and the implementation of these procedures are updated and reviewed regularly, working with the Directors and consulting with staff as necessary. Opportunities are provided for staff to contribute to and shape safeguarding arrangements and child protection policy at each review point.

7.2 The Designated Safeguarding Lead will update the Senior Management Team regularly on the operation of the College’s safeguarding arrangements.

7.3. Any child protection incidents at the College will be followed by a review of these procedures by the Designated Safeguarding Lead and a report made to the Directors. Where an incident involves a member of staff, the designated officer will assist in this review to determine whether any improvements can be made to the College’s procedures. Any deficiencies or weaknesses in regard to child protection arrangements at any time will be remedied without delay.

7.4. In addition, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will undertake an annual review of this Policy and the College’s safeguarding procedures, including the effectiveness of inter-agency working. The outcome of this annual review will be reported to the full Board of Directors.

The Directors will review this Policy and the implementation of its procedures and consider the proposed amendments to the Policy, from both the Designated Safeguarding Lead and its own members, before giving the revised Policy its final approval. Detailed minutes recording the review by the Directors will be made.

Safe Recruitment of Staff 

The College has a Safer Recruitment Policy which follows good practice guidelines (please see in line with the Recruitment Policy). A policy has been approved by senior management that sets out guidelines for DBS requirements. This is also covered for Contractors in the Contractor’s Policy. Where a DBS disclosure is not available prior to commencement of employment by the College, in exceptional circumstances, the principal can agree a start. Guidelines are set out in the ‘Risk Assessment Supervision Pending DBS Disclosure’ Policy.

Safer recruitment practice includes:

• Job descriptions and person specifications, which include reference to safeguarding responsibility.

• Advertising for all temporary and permanent posts.

• Advertisements which include the safeguarding statement.

• Application forms which include a section on criminal record self‐disclosure.

• Application information packs which include information about safeguarding policies, induction policy and procedures and the fact that suitability checks that will be conducted.

• Scrutinising applications, via robust short listing procedures, particularly looking at gaps in employment.

• Verifying identity and academic or vocational qualifications.

• Obtaining professional and character references.

• Checking previous employment history and ensuring that a candidate has the health and physical capacity for the job.

• Undertaking interviews where questions relating to safeguarding are included. • Undertaking DBS Certificate checks.

• Induction and Professional Development to include safeguarding awareness training.

• Lead interviewers to have safer recruitment training at regular intervals.

The College will ensure that:  A DBS Certificate for Child Workforce is obtained for all new appointments to the College’s workforce. A risk assessments is carried out, if a DBS certificate cannot be obtained before employment commences.  A single central record detailing a range of checks carried out on its staff is maintained, and records demonstrating that staff have completed appropriate safeguarding training for their role are also available.  All new appointments to the College workforce, who have lived outside the UK, are subject to additional checks, as appropriate. These are identified in our Recruitment Policy.  Supply staff have undergone the necessary safeguarding checks ‐ via the agency.

Students who are Subject to Criminal Investigation 

The college understands the power of education in improving the life chances of all young people, including those who may have been involved in early criminal activity.

Procedures for Students Enrolled at College in Process of Criminal Proceedings

Where a student is subject to a criminal investigation, the College may suspend the student until the criminal investigation and legal proceedings have concluded. However, this does not automatically preclude College from progressing with its own disciplinary action.

Parents/carers will be kept informed verbally and in writing of any action taken and they will be included in all meetings/risk assessments, where appropriate. The student and parents/carers should be reminded that, whilst criminal investigations are underway, they are obliged to keep the College informed of any progress and/or change in status regarding his/her case. Where the nature of the alleged offence suggests that there may be risk to the safety of others or, where the student accused of the offence may be at risk of harm, Associate Director for Inclusion will undertake a risk assessment.

This may result in action as follows:   As a first step, the student may be required to comply with specific conditions, for example, agreeing not to contact another student or students.

The student may be suspended or excluded, until such a time as any criminal proceedings have concluded. A precautionary suspension or exclusion should not be regarded as a penalty, and does not indicate that the student is presumed guilty of any offence. Suspensions will normally be carried out by a member of SLT.  The decision to temporarily suspend and/or exclude the student and the reasons why this action is being taken may be communicated verbally in the first instance and followed up in writing within one working day.  During the suspension, continuation of learning will be supported by the provision and marking of work.

The Director  of Studies  will be the designated contact.  The student may appeal against the decision to suspend and/or exclude in writing in accordance with the College’s Disciplinary policy.

Where criminal proceedings (including bail conditions, period of time spent on remand, period of time served in custody following conviction) result in a student being absent from his/her study for a period of less than 4 weeks, it will normally be the case, that the student’s place at College will be suspended for this period.

Where criminal proceedings (including bail conditions, period of time spent on remand, period of time served in custody following conviction) result in a student being absent from his/her study for a period in excess of 4 weeks, the student will be deemed withdrawn from the College. The student may then reapply for admission and, as part of the standard admissions process, will be required to declare criminal convictions to be considered prior to a decision regarding an offer of a place. A conviction in a criminal court shall be taken as conclusive evidence that the alleged offence has occurred.

Where a criminal conviction has been made, the focus of the disciplinary proceedings may include an assessment of the risk posed to staff or students and an assessment of the impact caused by reputational damage to the College.

Where, following initial investigation, a decision has been taken not to proceed to a criminal trial, this does not preclude the College from conducting further investigations and/or instigating disciplinary proceedings in respect of outstanding matters of concern that have not been addressed through criminal proceedings.

Admission Procedure for Student in Process of Criminal Proceedings

All applicants are asked on the application form if they have a criminal record or are involved in ongoing criminal proceedings. Those answering ‘yes’ are asked to provide supplementary details. The supplementary details are screened by the Director of  Studies, who makes an initial assessment of whether the record is relevant or not.

Where the criminal record is considered a risk, the Director of Studies undertakes an initial risk assessment and informs the Principal.

The College may seek advice and information from other agencies involved with the applicant, or arrange for the student and parents/carers to be interviewed to collect further information or to clarify or confirm information. The  Director of Studies will inform the applicant of the outcome and any staff, who need to know, if a student is admitted to the course with conditions for managing risk or particular support needs. Otherwise, information on the criminal record is not passed on.

Failure to Declare Criminal Proceedings 

Where it is revealed that a student has not disclosed criminal proceedings or an unspent criminal conviction, the College will consider appropriate disciplinary action, dependent on the severity and impact of the disclosure. Failing to disclose a minor issue, which does not pose any risk to the College community or impact on the student’s ability to complete the course successfully, will be deemed serious misconduct and will result in a Written Warning.

Failing to disclose a significant issue, which might pose a risk to the College community or impact on the student’s ability to complete the course, will be deemed gross misconduct and the student’s place at College may be withdrawn following investigation and a formal disciplinary hearing. College may suspend the student, until a thorough investigation and risk assessment has been conducted.

Confidentiality

The College will deal with all matters relating to declarations of convictions or criminal proceedings in a confidential manner and details will be held securely, alongside other information the College holds. Information will only be shared with colleagues or other organisations.

8.Contacts

8.1 The details of the designated officer are as follows:

FRANCES BURNS

Ashbourne College

17, Old Court Place,

London. W8 4PL

TEL: 0207 937 3858

frances.burns@ashbournecollege.co.uk

8.2 The telephone numbers of the Tri Borough (Kensington & Chelsea, Westminster, Hammersmith & Fulham) Children’s Social Care Department are as follows:

RBKC Child Protection Services Kensington and Chelsea Duty Line – Tel: 020 7361 3013 (Out of hours – 020 7361 3013)

 

RBKC Social Services Sarah Stalker

Family Support and Child Protection Adviser

Telephone: 020 7598 4640

Mobile: 07971 322 482

Email: sarah.stalker@rbkc.gov.uk

*Specialism: Child Sexual Exploitation (Monday/Tuesday and Wednesday only)

Rupinder Virdee

Family Support and Child Protection Adviser

Mobile: 07989 155 271

Email: rupinder.virdee@rbkc.gov.uk

Angela Clayton

Family Support and Child Protection Adviser (Wednesday to Friday)

Mobile: 07807 159 907

Email: angela.clayton@rbkc.gov.uk

Sarah Mangold

Tri-borough Safeguarding Practice Lead

Mobile: 07984 016 841

Email: sarah.mangold@rbkc.gov.uk

Tri-Borough Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) Esohoe Erhahon
Education Lead, Tri-Borough MASH
Telephone: 020 7641 5026
Email: eerhahon@westminster.gov.uk
Contact details for the Tri-Borough Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) for referral and management of allegations against staff:

 

 

 

Tri-Borough LADO contact details: (if you cannot reach a LADO above).

KEMBRA HEALY

Safe Organisation Manager and Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO)

Telephone: Kensington and Chelsea

Please call 07739315432 and ask to speak to the Duty Child Protection Advisor

Email: kembra.healy@lbhf.gov.uk

Hilary Shaw                      Tri-Borough Safeguarding in Schools and Education Manager

Tel: 07817 365 519            Email: hilary.shaw@rbkc.gov.uk

Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Training, Consultation and Advice for Schools and Education:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Wynne-

RBKC

Safeguarding Adults Coordinator Safeguarding Adults Coordinator

Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea 

Hilary Shaw
Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Schools and Education Officer
Telephone: 020 7598 4876
Mobile: 07817 365 519
Email: Hilary.Shaw@rbkc.gov.ukMary WynneSafeguarding Adults Coordinator Safeguarding Adults CoordinatorTelephone: Tel: 0207 361 2484Mobile: 07973 124 491Email: Mary.Wynne@rbkc.gov.uk

8.3 The telephone numbers of relevant Prevent partners are as follows

Tri Borough PREVENT Officer

 

Jake Butterworth

 

 

Room 224, Hammersmith Town Hall

Email: jake.butterworth@lbhf.gov.uk

Secure email: jake.butterworth@lbhf.gcsx.gov.uk

Tel: 0208 753 5843

 

 

Prevent Officer for H & F and RBKC and Channel Adviser Contact: Pinakin Patel

 

Pinakin.patel@lbhf.gov.uk

Telephone: 020 8753 5727

8.4 Contacts for pupils:

RBKC Local Safeguarding Children’s Board Kensington and Chelsea Social Services:

 

socialservices@rbkc.gov.uk

or tel: 020 7361 3013

 

Childline 0800 1111
NSPCC

Children’s Commissioner

 

 

 

The Haven

(Sexual Assault Advice / Support)

 

 

0808 800 5000

0800 528 0731

0203 299 6900

Anne Longfield OBE

Tel: 0207 783 8330

info.request@childrenscommissioner.gsi.gov.uk

Need help?

Urgent advice / appointments

020 3299 69

College approved counsellor

 

 

Catherine McCloskey
Tel: 07584 135 380
Email:  catherine@space-to-talk.com andmccloskeycj@aol.comWebsite: http://www.space-to-talk.com/index.html
Authorised by Resolution of Directors
Signed

Date

Stephen Chang /Mike Kirby/Fran Burns /Lee Kirby

04 September 2017

Effective date of the policy 04 September 2017

 

 Authorised by Mike Kirby (Principal)
Date 04 September 2017
Effective date of the policy 04 September 2017
Circulation Teaching staff / all staff / parents / Students on request
Review date September 2018

 


Appendix 1. The Designated Safeguarding Lead

1 The Designated Safeguarding Lead for the College site is FRANCES BURNS, DSL, who may be contacted on 0207 937 3858

2 The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Leads are:

LEE KIRBY, Deputy DSL, who may be contacted on 0207 937 3858

SEAN PILLAI, Deputy DSL, who may be contacted on 0207 937 3858

RUCHI AGARWAL, Deputy DSL, who may be contacted on 0207 937 3858

3 The Safeguarding Lead will NOT delegate their strategic duties. The main responsibilities of the Designated Safeguarding Lead are included in that person’s job description and can be found in Keeping children safe in education (2016) annex B

  1. The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Leads will carry out this role where the Designated Safeguarding Lead is unavailable.
  2. The Designated Safeguarding Lead and the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Leads have undertaken child protection training and training in inter-agency working, and will attend refresher training at two-yearly intervals with at least annual updates in order to:

5.1. understand the assessment process for providing early help and intervention, for example through locally agreed common and shared assessment processes such as early help assessments;

5.2. have a working knowledge of how local authorities conduct a child protection case conference and a child protection review conference and be able to attend and contribute to these effectively when required to do so;

5.3. ensure each member of staff has access to and understands the College’s child protection policy and procedures, especially new and part time staff;

5.4. be alert to the specific needs of children in need, those with special educational needs and young carers;

5.5. be able to keep detailed, accurate, secure written records of concerns and referrals;

5.6. obtain access to resources and attend any relevant or refresher training courses;

5.7. encourage a culture of listening to children and taking account of their wishes and feelings, among all staff, in any measures the College may put in place to protect them and to meet the requirements and procedures of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board.

Appendix 2. Types and signs of abuse

Types of abuse

1.1. Abuse is a form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, by others (e.g. via the internet). They may be abused by an adult or adults or another child or children. Part one of Keeping children safe in education 2015 defines the following types of abuse.

1.2. Physical abuse: a form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

1.3. Emotional abuse: the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone.

1.4. Sexual abuse: involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

1.5. Neglect: the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to: provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

1.6. Keeping children safe in education 2016 lists the following as specific safeguarding issues:

1.6.1 children missing from education

Knowing where children are during school hours is an extremely important aspect of Safeguarding. Missing school can be an indicator of abuse and neglect and may also raise concerns about child sexual exploitation. We monitor attendance carefully and address poor or irregular attendance without delay. This is particularly vital for our Middle School pupils who tend to be statutory school age.

In line with the Pupil (Registration) Regs* (2016) Ashbourne has:

1.Staff who understand what to do when children do not attend regularly
2. Appropriate policies, procedures and responses for pupils who go missing from education (especially on repeat occasions).
3. Staff who know the signs and triggers for travelling to conflict zones, FGM and forced marriage.
4. Procedures to inform the local authority when we plan to take pupils off-roll at non-standard transition points:

We will ensure that pupils who are expected to attend the college but fail to take up the place will be referred to the local authority.

When a pupil leaves the school, we will record the name of the pupil’s new school and their expected start date.

NB * See also our ‘Starters & Leavers’ Protocol Update: Ashbourne will notify the local RBKC CME contact in line with new statutory procedures on a weekly basis.

1.6.2 children missing from home or care

1.6.3 bullying including cyberbullying

1.6.4 domestic violence

1.6.5 drugs

1.6.6 fabricated or induced illness

1.6.7 faith abuse

1.6.8 forced marriage

1.6.9 honour based violence and abuse, including forced marriage, FGM, breast ironing and other abuses linked to so-called ‘honour’

1.6.10 gangs and youth violence

1.6.11 gender-based violence / violence against women and girls

1.6.12 peer relationship abuse

1.6.13 mental health

1.6.14 private fostering

1.6.15 preventing radicalisation (see section 3 below)

1.6.16 sexting / youth produced imagery

1.6.17 teenage relationship abuse

1.6.18 trafficking.

Details of the above can be found in the government document ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education Part 1 – September 2016, available to view and download here

1.6.19 Child sexual exploitation is a form of sexual abuse where children are sexually exploited for money, power or status. It can involve violent, humiliating and degrading sexual assaults. In some cases, young people are persuaded or forced into exchanging sexual activity for money, drugs, gifts, affection or status. Consent cannot be given, even where a child may believe they are voluntarily engaging in sexual activity with the person who is exploiting them. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact and can happen online. A significant number of children who are victims of sexual exploitation go missing from home, care and education at some point. Some of the following signs may be indicators of sexual exploitation:

  • Children who appear with unexplained gifts or new possessions;
  • Children who associate with other young people involved in exploitation;
  • Children who have older boyfriends or girlfriends;
  • Children who suffer from sexually transmitted infections or become pregnant;
  • Children who suffer from changes in emotional well-being;
  • Children who misuse drugs and alcohol;
  • Children who go missing for periods of time or regularly come home late; and
  • Children who regularly miss school or education or do not take part in education.

1.6.20 So called ‘honour based’ violence (HBV) includes a range of abuses undertaken to protect or defend the perceived honour of a family, cultural group or community. It may include, but is not limited to, forced marriage, FGM (see below), breast ironing, abuse linked to a belief in spirit possession. All forms of HBV are abuse and should be passed to the DSL in line with College procedures.

1.6.21 Female genital mutilation: is a type of so called ‘honour based’ violence. Professionals in all agencies, and individuals and groups in relevant communities, need to be alert to the possibility of a girl being at risk of FGM, or already having suffered FGM. There is a range of potential indicators that a child or young person may be at risk of FGM, which individually may not indicate risk but if there are two or more indicators present this could signal a risk to the child or young person.

Victims of FGM are likely to come from a community that is known to practise FGM. Professionals should note that girls at risk of FGM may not yet be aware of the practice or that it may be conducted on them, so sensitivity should always be shown when approaching the subject. Warning signs that FGM may be about to take place, or may have already taken place, can be found on pages 11-12 of the Multi-Agency Practice Guidelines. Staff who believe a girl may be at risk of FGM (as opposed to becoming aware that FGM has been carried out) should pass their concerns to the Designated Safeguarding Lead in line with our Child Protection policy and Procedures.

The Mandatory Duty to report FGM In line with the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 (amended by the Serious Crime Act 2015) if a teacher or member of support staff becomes aware that a girl has experienced FGM (as opposed to suspects she may be at risk), they have a duty to notify the police without delay. Wherever possible, the staff member should also notify the College Designated Safeguarding Lead unless they have good reason not to.

2. Signs and indicators of abuse

2.1 Possible signs / indicators of abuse include, but are not limited to:

2.1.1 the pupil says [● he / she / they] has been abused or asks a question or makes a comment which gives rise to that inference

2.1.2 there is no reasonable or consistent explanation for a pupil’s injury, the injury is unusual in kind or location or there have been a number of injuries and there is a pattern to the injuries

2.1.3 the pupil’s behaviour stands out from the group as either being extreme model behaviour or extremely challenging behaviour, or there is a sudden or significant change in the pupil’s behaviour

2.1.4 the pupil asks to drop subjects with a particular teacher and seems reluctant to discuss the reasons

2.1.5 the pupil’s development is delayed, the pupil loses or gains weight or there is deterioration in the pupil’s general wellbeing

2.1.6 the pupil appears neglected, e.g. dirty, hungry, inadequately clothed

2.1.7 the pupil is reluctant to go home, or has been openly rejected by his / her parents or carers

2.1.8 inappropriate behaviour displayed by other members of staff or any other person working with children, for example inappropriate sexual comments; excessive one to one attention beyond the requirements of their usual role or responsibilities; or inappropriate sharing of images.

2.2 The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board can provide advice on the signs of abuse and the DfE advice What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused (2015) provides advice in identifying child abuse. The NSPCC website is also a good source of information and advice.

3. Radicalisation and the Prevent duty

3.1 The College has a legal duty to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism.

3.2 The College aims to build pupils’ resilience to radicalisation by promoting fundamental British values and enabling them to challenge extremist views. The College is committed to providing a safe space in which children, young people and staff can understand the risks associated with terrorism and develop the knowledge and skills to be able to challenge extremist arguments.

3.3 The College has adopted the Government’s definitions for the purposes of compliance with the Prevent duty:

Extremism: “vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. We also include in our definition of extremism calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas”

Radicalisation: “the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and forms of extremism leading to terrorism”

3.4 There is no single way of identifying an individual who is likely to be susceptible to a terrorist ideology. As with managing other safeguarding risks, staff should be alert to changes in children’s behaviour which could indicate that they may be in need of help or protection. Children at risk of radicalisation may display different signs or seek to hide their views. College staff should use their professional judgement in identifying children who might be at risk of radicalisation and act proportionately. In particular, outward expressions of faith, in the absence of any other indicator of vulnerability, will not be regarded as a reason to make a referral to Channel.

3.5 Channel Duty Guidance: Protecting vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorism (2015) notes the following:

3.6. There is no single way of identifying who is likely to be vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism. Factors that may have a bearing on someone becoming vulnerable may include: peer pressure, influence from other people or via the internet, bullying, crime against them or their involvement in crime, anti-social behaviour, family tensions, race/hate crime, lack of self-esteem or identity and personal or political grievances.

Example indicators that an individual is engaged with an extremist group, cause or ideology include:

  • spending increasing time in the company of other suspected extremists;
  • changing their style of dress or personal appearance to accord with the group;
  • day-to-day behaviour becoming increasingly centred around an extremist ideology, group or cause;
  • loss of interest in other friends and activities not associated with the extremist ideology, group or cause;
  • possession of material or symbols associated with an extremist cause (e.g. the swastika for far right groups);
  • attempts to recruit others to the group/cause/ideology; or
  • communications with others that suggest identification with a group/cause/ideology.
  1. Example indicators that an individual has an intention to cause harm, use violence or other illegal means include:
  • clearly identifying another group as threatening what they stand for and blaming that group for all social or political ills;
  • using insulting or derogatory names or labels for another group;
  • speaking about the imminence of harm from the other group and the importance of action now;
  • expressing attitudes that justify offending on behalf of the group, cause or ideology;
  • condoning or supporting violence or harm towards others; or
  • plotting or conspiring with others.”

3.7 Protecting children from the risk of radicalisation is part of the College’s wider safeguarding duties, and is similar in nature to protecting children from other harms (e.g. drugs, gangs, neglect, sexual exploitation), whether these come from within their family or are the product of outside influences.

Appendix 3 Guidance for staff and volunteers on suspecting or hearing a disclosure of abuse
  1. Action staff must take
  • 1. A member of staff or volunteer suspecting or hearing a disclosure of abuse:
  • 1.1 must listen carefully to the child and keep an open mind. The member of staff should not take a decision as to whether or not the abuse has taken place;
  • 1.2 must not ask leading questions, i.e. a question which suggests its own answer. Instead, use TED (tell, explain, describe) to clarify the information you are being given;
  • 1.3 must reassure the child but not give a guarantee of absolute confidentiality. The member of staff should explain that they need to pass on the information in accordance with this Policy so that the correct action can be taken; and
  • 1.4 must keep a sufficient record of the conversation. The record should include:
  • (a) the date and time;
  • (b) the place of the conversation; and
  • (c) the essence of what was said and done by whom and in whose presence; and
  • (d) must be signed by the person making it, using names and not initials.

1.2. The written record and all other evidence, for example, scribbled notes, mobile phones containing text messages, clothing, computers, must be kept securely and passed on when reporting the matter in accordance with paragraph 1.3 below.

1.3. All concerns, suspicions or disclosures of abuse must be reported to the Designated Safeguarding Lead as soon as possible, unless it is an allegation against a member of staff in which case the procedures set out in Appendix 4 should be followed.

1.4. If, at any point, there is a risk of immediate serious harm to a child a referral should be made to children’s social care immediately. Anybody can make a referral. If the child’s situation does not appear to be improving the staff member with concerns should press for re-consideration.

Appendix 4. Dealing with allegations against members of staff, the Principal Directors or volunteers

The College’s procedures

1.1. The College’s procedures for dealing with allegations made against staff will be used where the member of staff, the Principal Director or volunteer has:

1.1.1. behaved in a way that has harmed a child, or may have harmed a child;

1.1.2. possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child; or

1.1.3. behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates he or she would pose a risk of harm to children.

1.2. Any allegations not meeting these criteria will be dealt with in accordance with the RBKC Local Safeguarding Children Board procedures. Advice from the designated officer will be sought in borderline cases.

1.3. All such allegations must be dealt with as a priority without delay.

1.4. Allegations against a teacher who is no longer teaching and historical allegations will be referred to the police.

2. Reporting an allegation against a member of staff, the Principal Director or volunteer

2.1. Where an allegation or complaint is made against any member of staff, the Designated Safeguarding Lead or a volunteer, the matter should be reported immediately to the Principal, or in [• his / her / their] absence to the Nominated Safeguarding Director. The allegation will be discussed immediately with the designated officer before further action is taken. Where appropriate, the Principal will consult with the Designated Safeguarding Lead.

2.2. Where an allegation or complaint is made against the Principal, the matter should be reported immediately to Chair or the Nominated Safeguarding Director, without first notifying the Principal. The allegation will be discussed immediately with the designated officer before further action is taken. The Chair will consult the Nominated Safeguarding Director, and vice versa.

2.3. Where an allegation is made against any Governor, the matter should be reported immediately to the Chair or the Nominated Safeguarding Director. The allegation will be discussed immediately with the designated officer before further action is taken. Where appropriate, the Chair will consult the Nominated Safeguarding Director, and vice versa.

2.4. If it is not possible to report to the Principal or Chair or Nominated Safeguarding Director in the circumstances set out above, a report should be made immediately to the Designated Safeguarding Lead or, if he / she is unavailable, the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead. The Designated Safeguarding Lead will take action in accordance with these procedures and will as soon as possible inform the Principal or, where appropriate, Chair and the Nominated Safeguarding Director.

2.5. The person taking action in accordance with the procedures in this Appendix is known as the “case manager”.

3. Disclosure of information

3.1. The case manager will inform the accused person of the allegation as soon as possible after the designated officer has been consulted.

3.2. The parents of the child[ren] involved will be informed of the allegation as soon as possible if they do not already know of it. They will also be kept informed of the progress of the case, including the outcome (but not the detail) of any disciplinary process. The timing and extent of disclosures, and the terms on which they are made, will be dependent upon and subject to the laws on confidence and data protection and the advice of external agencies.

3.3. Where the designated officer advises that a strategy discussion is needed, or the police or children’s social care need to be involved, the case manager will not inform the accused or the parents or carers until these agencies have been consulted and it has been agreed what information can be disclosed.

3.4. The reporting restrictions preventing the identification of a teacher who is the subject of such an allegation in certain circumstances will be observed.

4. Further action to be taken by the College

4.1. A College has a duty of care towards its employees and as such, it must ensure that effective support is provided for anyone facing an allegation. The College will take action in accordance with Part four of Keeping children safe in education 2016 and the College’s employment procedures.

5. Ceasing to use staff

5.1. If the College ceases to use the services of a member of staff or volunteer because they are unsuitable to work with children, a settlement/compromise agreement will not be used and a referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service will be made as soon as possible if the criteria are met. Any such incidents will be followed by a review of the safeguarding procedures within the College, with a report being presented to the Directors without delay.

5.2. If a member of staff or volunteer tenders his or her resignation, or ceases to provide his or her services, any child protection allegations will still be followed up by the College in accordance with this policy and a referral will be made to the Disclosure and Barring Service as soon as possible if the criteria are met.

5.3. Where a teacher has been dismissed, or would have been dismissed had he / she not resigned, separate consideration will be given as to whether a referral to the National College for Teaching and Leadership should be made.

6. Unsubstantiated, false or malicious allegations

6.1. Where an allegation by a pupil is shown to have been deliberately invented or malicious, the Principal will consider whether to take disciplinary action in accordance with the College’s behaviour and discipline policy.

6.2. Where a parent has made a deliberately invented or malicious allegation the Principal will consider whether to require that parent to withdraw their child or children from the College on the basis that they have treated the College or a member of staff unreasonably.

6.3. Whether or not the person making the allegation is a pupil or a parent (or staff member other member of the public), the College reserves the right to contact the police to determine whether any action might be appropriate.

7. Record keeping

7.1. Details of allegations found to be malicious will be removed from personnel records.

7.2. For all other allegations, full details will be recorded on the confidential personnel file of the person accused. The record will be retained at least until the individual has reached normal pension age or for a period of ten years from the date of the allegation, if this is longer[1].

7.3. An allegation proven to be false, unsubstantiated or malicious will not be referred to in employer references. In accordance with Keeping children safe in education 2016, a history of repeated concerns or allegations which have all been found to be false, unsubstantiated or malicious will also not be included in any reference

Appendix 5. Role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director

1. The Board of Directors have nominated one of its members to take leadership of the College’s safeguarding arrangements on behalf of the Board and to liaise with external agencies where this is required, including in the event of allegations of abuse made against the Principal or a member of the Board of Directors. The Nominated Safeguarding Director is Stephan Chang.

2. The Nominated Safeguarding Director will play an essential role in ensuring children are kept safe from harm. If the Nominated Safeguarding Director is unavailable his / her role and duties will be carried out by the Chair.

3. The Nominated Safeguarding Director and the Chair will undertake appropriate training in accordance with the Local Safeguarding Children Board’s recommendations to fulfil the role and duties.

4. The main role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director are to:

4.1. be familiar with the Local Safeguarding Children Board guidance and procedures relating to safeguarding and child protection and associated issues, and to attend training for nominated safeguarding and child protection governors, where available;

4.2. ensure that the Directors put in place a suitable safeguarding and child protection policy and associated procedures which have regard to regulations and standards issued by the Secretary of State for Education (DfE) in accordance with section 94 of the Education and Skills Act 2008 and sections 29 and 38 of the Counter- Terrorism and Security Act 2015 and associated regulations;

4.3. champion safeguarding and child protection issues within the College;

4.4. encourage other members of the Board of Directors to develop their understanding of the Board of Directors’ responsibilities with regard to child protection and assist them to perform their functions in respect of safeguarding children and young people;

4.5. contribute to ensuring any deficiencies in the College’s safeguarding practices which may be brought to Directors’ attention by a member of College staff, a parent, an officer of the local authority or from any other source are addressed;

4.6. meet regularly with the College’s Designated Safeguarding Lead in order to monitor the effectiveness of the College’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures and the implementation of these across the College. It is recommended that this is at least a termly meeting;

4.7. ensure that the Directors receive an annual report on the implementation of the College’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures from the Designated Safeguarding Lead;

4.8. ensure that the Designated Safeguarding Lead is part of the College’s senior leadership team, and has sufficient time and resources at his / her disposal to carry out his / her duties effectively;

4.9. ensure that a Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead is identified;

4.10. ensure that the Designated Safeguarding Lead and Deputy Designated Safeguarding Leads receive the necessary training at least every two years – and keep updated on all new training aspects related to Safeguarding or Child Protection at least annually;

4.11. ensure that training in child protection is provided to all staff, including Lunch Time Supervisors, administrative staff and other ancillary staff, in accordance with the Local Safeguarding Children Board recommendations with at least annual updates;

4.12. ensure that arrangements are in place for the inclusion of child protection training on the College’s procedures in an induction programme for all people working in the College, no matter for how long, nor the status of that individual;

4.13. ensure arrangements are in place to ensure safer recruitment procedures and appropriate checks are undertaken on all new staff and volunteers and to carry out a check of the College’s Single Central Register on at least an annual basis;

4.14. be aware of how safeguarding and child protection issues are addressed through the curriculum and to take responsibility at Governor level to ensure that pupils are taught about safeguarding and given guidance on adjusting behaviour to reduce risks including the safe use of electronic devices and the internet, building resilience to protect themselves and their peers, and provided with information about who they should turn to for help within in the College;

4.15. to provide information to the local authority about how the Board of Directors’ duties in respect of safeguarding and child protection have been discharged if requested.

5. The Nominated Safeguarding Director or the Chair will liaise with the Principal and the local authority regarding all confidential child protection issues involving allegations against staff.

6. Where there is an allegation of abuse against the Principal, or against a member of the Board of Directors, the Nominated Safeguarding Director or the Chair (as appropriate in the circumstances) will take the lead in liaising with the local authority and/or other partner agencies including:

6.1 notifying the designated officer of the local authority immediately before any action is taken;

6.2 ensuring, with local authority support, that appropriate action is taken in accordance with agreed Local Safeguarding Children Board procedures;

6.3 attending initial and subsequent strategy meetings as required if other agencies are involved;

6.4 taking the lead in an investigation (when the Principal is unable to do so) under the College’s internal employment procedures when the other agencies’ involvement is at an end or as soon as it is confirmed that this may take place;

6.5 taking the lead in reviewing the College’s child protection and safeguarding policies and procedures with the Designated Safeguarding Lead, taking advice from the designated officer of the local authority, and making the necessary changes;

6.6 by sound use of all available data as indicated above, ensuring mechanisms are in place to enable staff, visitors and volunteers understand their responsibilities for safeguarding and child protection as outlined in Keeping children safe in education (2016).

Supporting Documentation

This policy and related procedures are driven by the following legislation and guidance:

  • 157 Prevent Toolkit  Children Act 1989  Children Act 2004
  • Children’s Plan 2007  Colleges – National Minimum Standards (DoH 2002)
  • Contest (The National Counter-Terrorism Strategy)
  • Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015
  • Dealing with allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff – Department for Education 2012
  • DfES Safeguarding Children in Education
  • Education Act 2011
  • Employment 35/13-protected cautions and convictions further advice, AOC, July 2013
  • Equality and Diversity Act 2010
  • Guidance for Safer Working Practice for Adults who Work with Children and Young People in Education Settings (DCSF 2009
  • Keeping Children Safe in Education September 2016 (Department for Education)
  • NSPCC – Guidance on Child Protection Records
  • Prevent Cloud Instructions and Guidelines
  • Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education (DfES 2010)
  • Safeguarding children from forced marriages
  • Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006
  • Safer Practice, Safer Learning (NIACE 2007)
  • Sefton – A coordinated response to self-harm in children and young people 2008
  • Sefton LSCB – Multi-Agency Threshold Pathway to Provision Handbook 2015
  • The Protection of Children in England – the Government Response to Lord Laming, 2009
  • Vetting and Barring Scheme – Update.
  • Independent Safeguarding Authority, 2009
  • Working Together to Safeguard Children (HM Government 2015)
Concern Refer to What happens next?
At risk of or suffering from significant harm The Children Act 1989 introduced Significant Harm as the threshold that justifies compulsory intervention in family life in the best interests of children. Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, Emotional Abuse and Neglect are all categories of Significant Harm. Harm is defined as the ill treatment or impairment of health and development Member of the safeguarding team will discuss the referral with you; arrange to meet the student and will take notes of their meeting, and will be responsible for any necessary follow up action with other agencies.

Referral to children’s/adult services or police will be made within 24 hours and will be confirmed in writing, within 48hrs. The safeguarding team member will record the details on the secure Safeguarding Database via Filemaker.

Alcohol/ substance misuse including ‘legal highs’ You are concerned that a student is harming themselves or at risk of harm through alcohol or substance misuse. This can include being parented or being cared for by an adult that abuses drugs or alcohol. Member of the safeguarding team will arrange to meet with the student and may refer them to an external agency. Invoke disciplinary procedure and/or mentoring/counselling support offered. The safeguarding team member will record the details on the safeguarding database. Fit to Study policy can be actioned if they are not fit to be at college.
A student is concealing illegal or dangerous items You believe that a student is carrying illegal items (e.g. drugs, including ‘legal highs’) or something dangerous (e.g. knife) and you would like a search to be requested Director of Studies and Health and Safety Manager will accompany the staff member to meet with the student. The power to search will be used where there is reasonable grounds for suspicion that a student has an illegal or dangerous item in their possession. The searcher can use a hand held metal detector, search of their bag and pat down a person’s clothing. If any drugs or dangerous items are found, they will be confiscated immediately and the police will be called if appropriate. If the student is under 18 years their parents/carers will be contacted. Disciplinary procedures will be followed. The duty manager will record the details on the incident form.
Allegations against staff.

You have an allegation or child protection concern about a member of staff working with children or adults at risk which indicates they have  Behaved in a way that has harmed or may harm a child or adult at risk  Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child or adult at risk Behaved towards a child, adults at risk in a way that indicates that they would pose a risk of harm

Allegations need to be reported immediately to:

The DSL who will refer on to the LADO or staff may refer directly to the LADO themselves.

(Local Authority Designated Officer – dealing directly with allegations against Staff.)

Kembra Healy @ RBKC

E Mail: kembra.healy@lbhf.gov.uk

Tel: 07823532538

OR for guidance and advice –

Hilary Shaw (Educational Advisor RBKC)

E mail : hilary.shaw@rbkc.gov.uk

Tel: 07817 365 519

Bullying and harassment

You are concerned that a student is being bullied or harassed, either within or outside College

The safeguarding team will note all relevant details and will liaise with the victim, bully/bullies and any other stakeholders as required. This information will be passed onto the Director/HOD for action which may include invoking disciplinary procedures.
Bullying may be direct or indirect, and may involve texting, emails, Facebook etc. monitor occurrences and can refer to safeguarding team for ongoing mentoring support, which can be offered, to victim and perpetrator.

will oversee the analysis of information and ensure that it is reported at Equality & Diversity Working Party meetings every term

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) An illegal activity by people who have power over children and young people and use it to sexually abuse them. This can involve a broad range of exploitive activity, from seemingly ‘consensual’ relationships and informal exchanges of sex for attention, accommodation, gifts or cigarettes, through to very serious organised crime  or going missing/Overtly sexualised dress, sexualised risk taking (including internet use)/Unaccounted increase in goods or money/Associating with unknown adults/ Reduced contact with friends and other support networks/Sexually transmitted infections/Experimenting with drugs and alcohol/Poor self-image, eating disorders, self-harm/Non-school attendance/Associating with other sexually exploited young people/secretive about mobile phone/more than one mobile phone

Medium Risk Indicators – Getting into cars with unknown adults or associating with unknown CSE adults/Being groomed on the internet/Receiving rewards for money or goods for recruiting peers into CSE/Clipping-i.e. offering to have sex for money or other payment and then running before sex takes place/Disclosure of physical sexual assault and then refusing to make or withdrawing complaint/Reports of being involved in CSE through being seen in hotspots/Having a much older boyfriend/girlfriend/Missing school or excluded from school due to behaviour/Staying out over night with no reasonable explanation/Breakdown of residential placements due to behaviour/Unaccounted for money or goods included mobile phones, drugs and alcohol/Multiple sexually transmitted infections/Self harming/Repeat offenders/Gang member association High Risk Indicators – Pattern of street homelessness and staying with an adult believed to be sexually exploiting them/Child under 16 meeting different adults and engaging in sexual activity/Being taken to clubs and hotels by adults to engage in sexual activity/Disclosure of serious sexual assault and then withdrawal of statement/Abduction or false imprisonment/Disappearing from the ‘system’ with no contact or support/Multiple miscarriage or termination/Chronic alcohol and drug use

If the risk is immediate and urgent, and there is clear evidence of an offence, Safeguarding team will refer to the Police immediately. Safeguarding team to Complete SSCB CSE assessment tool and will, refer to Children’s Service or Emergency Duty Team if appropriate or explore early help options. Safeguarding team will record all concerns and decisions on to Student Safeguarding file
Child Trafficking/ Modern Slavery You are concerned that a student may be at risk of or subjected to child/human trafficking, which is the exploitation of a person for financial or sexual purposes – e.g. prostitution, drugs running, underage working, forced labour and domestic servitude The safeguarding team will make a referral to Children’s Services and/or the police. 7 Safeguarding Procedures 2016/17 exploitation of a person for financial or sexual purposes – e.g. prostitution, drugs running, underage working, forced labour and domestic servitude
Domestic Violence You are concerned that a learner is in a violent relationship or that they are affected by witnessing domestic violence at home. This can also include them being the perpetrator of domestic violence. Domestic violence can include psychological, physical, sexual, financial, emotional abuse and ‘honour based violence. Any disclosure of abuse should therefore be treated seriously and as a potential child protection concern. The safeguarding team will make a referral to Children’s Services and/or the police. When any professional becomes aware of domestic abuse within a family they should make an assessment as to the impact on the child and ascertain whether there are any other young children or vulnerable adults being subjected to domestic violence. Safeguarding team will record all concerns and decisions on to safeguarding evidence form.
E-Safety: A young person is putting themselves or someone else at risk through, for example, unsafe use of the internet, accessing inappropriate websites OR  A student has distributed /in possession inappropriate images You believe that a student has distributed inappropriate images by text, email, internet posting or any other mechanism OR  Where there are concerns about grooming, exposure to pornographic material or contacted by someone inappropriately, via the Internet or other ICT tools like a mobile phone The safeguarding team will investigate your concern and meet with any relevant parties as required and will record the details on the safeguarding database.

They   will investigate the concern and, in the presence of another staff member, may request to see a student’s phone. If they believe that the College email account or student’s internet access in college needs to be checked, they will contact the Head of IT Services for assistance.

Where appropriate a referral will be made to the police and/or the disciplinary process will be followed. Due to the nature of this type of abuse and the possibility of the destruction of evidence, the referrer should first discuss their concerns with the Police and Children’s/Adult Services before raising the matter with the family. This will enable a decision to be made about informing the family and ensuring that the child’s welfare is safeguarded. Images should not be viewed by or distributed further.

The learner should be asked to describe the image  should not be viewed by or distributed further. The learner should be asked to describe the imag

Female/genital mutilation (FGM) You are concerned that a student is at risk or has undertaken FGM. FGM is believed to be a way of ensuring virginity and chastity. It is used to prevent girls from having sexual feeling and sex outside of marriage. Although FGM is practiced by secular communities, it is most often claimed to be carried out in accordance with religious beliefs. FGM is not supported by any religious doctrine. The practice of FGM, which is illegal in the UK, carries a maximum prison term of 14 years for any UK national or permanent resident convicted of carrying it out, or aiding and abetting the process, while in the UK or overseas The safeguarding team will make a referral to Children’s Services and/or the police
Forced Marriage and Honour Based Violence– You are concerned that a student (any age) may have been or might be forced to marry against his/her will where duress is a factor. (Please note: Arranged marriage is an entirely separate issue and must not be confused with forced marriage). Forced marriage is when you face physical pressure to marry (e.g. threats, physical violence) or emotional and psychological pressure (e.g. if you are made to feel like you’re bringing shame on your family. Honour Based Violence will often go hand in hand with forced marriages, although this is not always the case. Honour based violence is an international term used by many cultures for justification of abuse and violence. It is defined as “an incident or crime which has or may have been committed to protect or defend the honour of the family and or the community The safeguarding team will take appropriate action – either phoning the police if the threat of forced marriage is imminent (within 24 hours of disclosure/concern); or Children’s Services (if the person is under 18 and the threat is not immediate within 24 hours). ; Or the Forced Marriage Unit 0207 008 0151 (if the person is over 18 years)
Homelessness You think that a student is at risk of homelessness, or has been made homeless. Safeguarding team will arrange to meet with the student to discuss short, medium and long-term support required and update the Safeguarding evidence form with all notes. Parents will be contacted if student is under 18 to establish if young person is missing or absent from home. A referral may be made to children’s services or Local Authority emergency housing service.
Mental Health and well- being Where there are concerns around a student’s mental state – how they are feeling and how well they can cope with day-to-day life. Mental wellbeing can change, from day to day, month to month or year to year. We all have times when we have low mental wellbeing – when we feel sad or stressed, or find it difficult to cope. For example, when we suffer some sort of loss; experience loneliness or relationships problems; or are worried about work or money. Sometimes, there is no clear reason why we experience a period of poor mental health

Mental health problems can include, depression, stress and anxiety, sleep disturbance, eating and body image, types of personality disorder, mania, bipolar, psychosis, hearing voices and schizophrenia

Safeguarding team will meet with the student and offer access to further support. If the student is under 18 years their parents/carers may be contacted if appropriate. Referral could be made to children’s services/adult social care, mental health services or college counsellor. A “fit to study” assessment will be undertaken if young person not fit to be at college (refer to fit to study policy
Radicalisation & Extremism, PREVENT Strategy Where there are concerns that a student is becoming radicalised and involved in an organisation which could harm the student and the community. Prevent is a strand of the Government counter terrorism strategy – CONTEST. Everyone has a role to play in supporting the aim of CONTEST. You can do this by remaining vigilant and reporting any suspicious activity which can include someone who:  Is behaving differently for no obvious reason  Travels for long periods of time but is vague about where they are going  Buying or storing large amounts of chemicals for no obvious reason  Visits or sends out links to extremist internet sites  Is recording and documenting information in a crowded location  And includes activity at a property that doesn’t fit day to day life The age and profile of our students make it crucial to be involved in the PREVENT Strategy and prevent people being drawn into terrorism by:  Promoting and reinforcing shared values  Breaking down segregation among different student communities by supporting inter-faith and inter-cultural understanding

Ensuring student safety and providing an environment that is free from bullying, harassment and discrimination  Supporting students who may be at risk and providing appropriate advice and guidance  Ensuring students and staff are aware of their roles and responsibilities in preventing violent and non-violent extremism

The safeguarding team will refer concerns to:  Anti-Terrorist Hotline: 0800 789 321  Crime stoppers: 0800 555 111  Relevant Police force: 101  www.gov.uk/report-suspicious-activity-to-mi5  www.gov.uk/report-terrorism  PREVENT Co-ordinator  Children’s Services  Channel Panel Channel may be appropriate for anyone who is vulnerable to being drawn into any form of terrorism. Channel is about ensuring that vulnerable children and adults of any faith, ethnicity or background receive support before their vulnerabilities are exploited by those that would want them to embrace terrorism, and before they become involved in criminal terrorist related activity
Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour  Suicidal-intent – You are concerned that a student may attempt suicide; has indicated that they are having suicidal thoughts; discloses that they have previously attempted suicide; or that they have taken tablets or undertaken any other seriously self-harming activity  Self-harm – describes a wide range of things that people do to themselves in a deliberate and usually hidden way. Self-harm can involve: Cutting, burning, punching, bruising, inserting or swallowing objects, head banging, pulling out hair, eyelashes, restrictive or binge eating, overdosing or sniffing harmful substances (Mental Health Foundation 2006) The term selfharm is often used as an encompassing term referring to suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide  Self-Injury- is any act which involves deliberately inflicting pain and/or injury on the body, but without suicidal intent. Self-injury . Self-injury is Medical emergency (High Risk) 1)Emergency Services & Ambulance (if the danger is immediate) 2)Safeguardi ng team 3)College Nurse/first aider Raised Risk 1)Safeguardi ng team 2)College nurse 3)Counsellor Low Risk Best practice:- if student is coherent, You can call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergency A member of the safeguarding team will meet with the student immediately and make an assessment of the best course of action. In the event that: i) The student has taken tablets or undertaken some other method to pose immediate harm to him- or herself, immediate medical attention will be sought. ii) Students will be asked for consent to contact a parent/carer; if consent is not offered, contact will need to be made anyway to parents/carers of those aged under 18 years or adults at risk. iii) Referral will be made to Children’s services within 24 hours iv) A “fit to study” assessment will be undertaken before the student is permitted to return to College v) Referral to mental health service or counsellor will be assigned to support the student; vi) If the student has previously attempted suicide, may be at risk of suicide and/or has expressed suicidal thoughts, a mentor will be assigned to support the student. 12 Safeguarding Procedures 2016/17 seen as a coping mechanism with the aim of relieving emotional distress Best practice: if student is coherent, You can call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergency A member of the safeguarding team will meet with the student immediately and make an assessment of the best course of action. In the event that: i) The student has taken tablets or undertaken some other method to pose immediate harm to him- or herself, immediate medical attention will be sought. ii) Students will be asked for consent to contact a parent/carer; if consent is not offered, contact will need to be made anyway to parents/carers of those aged under 18 years or adults at risk. iii) Referral will be made to Children’s services within 24 hours iv) A “fit to study” assessment will be undertaken before the student is permitted to return to College v) Referral to mental health service or counsellor will be assigned to support the student; vi) If the student has previously attempted suicide, may be at risk of suicide and/or has expressed suicidal thoughts, a mentor will be assigned to support the student.

Vulnerable groups and how we support them:

Vulnerable Groups Refer to What happens next?
Adult at risk An ‘adult at risk’ is defined by the department of health as a person aged 18 years or older who is or may be in need of community care services by reason of mental or other disability, age or illness; and who is or may be unable to take care of him or herself, or unable to protect him or herself against significant harm or exploitation Characteristics/factors that might make someone more at risk of harm include:  Not having mental capacity to make decisions about their own safety – including having fluctuating mental capacity associated with mental illness  Communication difficulties  Physical dependency – being dependent on others for personal care and activities of daily life  Low self-esteem  Experience of abuse  Childhood experience of abuse  Being cared for in a care setting where they are more or less dependent on others

Not getting the right amount or the right kind of care that they need  Living in a family with multiple problems  Isolation and social exclusion  Stigma and discrimination  Lack of access to information and support  Being the focus of anti-social behaviour Some of these traits will apply to young adults with SEN/D and care should be taken to recognise their needs and vulnerabilities.

The Safeguarding team will liaise with Adult Social Care to ensure that adults at risk are protected against significant harm and exploitation. An adult at risk is someone who is unable to take care of him or herself, or unable to protect him or herself against significant harm or exploitation. One way to evaluate whether or not someone can take of themselves is to assess their mental capacity to make decisions about their own safety. In the safeguarding context, mental capacity is the ability of a person to:  Understand the implications of their situation and the risks to themselves

Take action themselves to prevent abuse  Participate to the fullest extent possible in decision making about interventions involving them, be they life-changing events or everyday matter

Young Carers A carer provides unpaid care for a family member or friend who has a long-term physical or mental health problem or disability, or a drug or alcohol dependency. Some are the main carers in the household; others supplement the caring undertaken by other members of the family. The caring tasks can include:  Domestic tasks (e.g. cooking, cleaning, shopping)  Personal care (e.g. helping with mobility; washing; dressing; giving medicine

Personal care (e.g. helping with mobility; washing; dressing; giving medicine)  Emotional support & supervision (e.g. watching over someone; providing company and a ‘listening ear’)  Sibling care: Looking after an ill or disabled sibling or a non-disabled sibling where a ill or disabled parent is unable to provide care  Communication support (e.g., interpreting; answering phone or door)  Financial management: (e.g. budgeting; paying bills)

Young Carers – are designated by OFSTED as a vulnerable group of students and they recommend their identification and support as best practice, making necessary adjustments where able. If you become aware of a student with a caring responsibilities inform the Safeguarding team, who will ensure that this information is appropriately shared via Promonitor and that the student is offered an extra support meeting at least once a term with the group tutor /Mentor and external agencies if appropriate. Many young carers do not realise that they are carers until they perceive the impact of their responsibilities upon their lives. Even if that impact causes significant discomfort or problems, many young people with not identify themselves as carer
Young Parents/pregnancy Student has disclosed that she is pregnant The Safeguarding Lead or Personal Tutor will help to arrange access to appropriate support services or counsellor if the pregnancy is not to continue. If the student intends to proceed with a full-term pregnancy -The Head of Department is responsible for the on-going risk assessment for the student and updating actions listed on Promonitor. A copy of this needs to be sent to college nurse – The safeguarding team to offer the student ongoing support. – College nurse to will arrange a time to meet the student.

Safeguarding on Residential Trips and Visits 

Please refer to our to our  Educational Visits Policy found at https://www.ashbournecollege.co.uk/college-policy/ashbourne_college_educational_trips_policy/

Safer Working Practice for Staff 

It is very important that staff undertake their duties in a professional way and understand the boundaries to employ in their day to day work, both to protect themselves and the young people in their care.

Interviewing Students All staff are aware of the potential risks (i.e. false allegations against staff) of interviewing a young person alone, particularly if the young person has an experience of sexual/emotional abuse. Interviewing individual students is an integral part of our work and therefore staff should exercise their own professional judgement and a degree of caution in these situations. All staff should try to ensure that they do not place themselves in any compromising situations, where allegations could potentially be made against them.

Suggested protective measures to consider:

ask another person (teacher/tutor or young person’s friend – as appropriate to the content) to sit in on the interview.

sit in a room where it is possible to be observed through a window or glass‐panelled door.  Do not close the door of the room, if you are not clearly visible from outside the room.

Child Protection and Safeguarding Procedures flowchart