Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures

1. Overview
This policy has been authorised by the Principal (Mike Kirby) and is addressed to all members of the Ashbourne community (staff, visitors, parents, guardians volunteers and students). It applies wherever members of the Ashbourne community are working with students, even when this is away from the College’s premises, for example on an educational visit.

Ashbourne recognises that safeguarding and promoting the welfare of students is defined as:

  • protecting children from maltreatment;
  • preventing impairment of children’s health or development;
  • ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care; and
  • taking action to enable all children to achieve the best outcomes.

Ashbourne is a small community with approximately 300 students, ranging from the ages of 14-21. This policy is underpinned by Ashbourne’s own value statement which includes ‘Students Come First’ as one of the key values: the College has a duty to consider at all times the best interests of the student and take action to enable all students to achieve the best outcomes. Every student should feel safe and protected from any form of abuse. Ashbourne also firmly believes that providing excellent safeguarding support can have a significant positive impact on student performance.

Ashbourne is committed to the promotion and development of equality and diversity. We believe that all students, regardless of age, gender, ability, culture, ethnicity, race, language, religion, beliefs, caste, disability or sexual identity, have equal rights to protection: to feel safe, secure, valued and respected, and feel confident, and know how to approach adults if they have any concerns. No student or group of students must be treated any less favourably than another in being able to access support and services which meet their particular needs. This policy will be implemented in accordance with our Equal Opportunities Policy, and decisions/actions taken in relation to potential safeguarding or child protection incidents will not be influenced by the background or situation of any persons involved. Each case will be dealt with on its own merits.

1.1 Important Contacts
The College’s Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) is Fran Burns, and her primary responsibility is to fulfill her duties in this position. Fran, who is a member of Ashbourne’s Senior Leadership Team, is ably supported by two Deputy Designated Safeguarding Leads (DDSL), Ruchi Agarwal and Lee Kirby. The DSL and Director of Studies (also a DDSL) are the Co-Heads of Ashbourne’s very small Middle School (no more than 30 students). Both of these individuals do not teach, which allows them to use their time to be more pro-active to help solve student problems. Key contact details are listed below and each member of the Safeguarding Team can be reached by calling Ashbourne’s mainline phone number (020 7937 3858) and ask to be put through to the relevant member of staff.

Designated Safeguarding Lead Ms. Frances Burns
Email: Frances.Burns@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Safeguarding Mobile: 07578 548537
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead Mr. Lee Kirby
Email: Lee@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Safeguarding Mobile: 07951 510 224
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead Mrs. Ruchi Agarwal
Email: Ruchi.Agarwal@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Nominated Safeguarding Director Mr. Stephen Chang
Email: Stephen@Changclan.com
Tel: 07785 732 428
Principal Mr. Mike Kirby
Email: Mike.Kirby@AshbourneCollege.co.uk

A full list of Ashbourne staff contacts relating to Safeguarding is provided in Appendix 4.

Due to Ashbourne’s small size (less than 300 students), and the low number of referrals that the College makes to the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) about its students each year, the DSL is able to manage all of the correspondence from Ashbourne to the relevant contacts at the council in a timely manner. Nevertheless, in order for Ashbourne to properly safeguard students, the College recognises that safeguarding and promoting the welfare of students is the responsibility of everyone in the Ashbourne community. It is, therefore, the community’s responsibility to understand how to recognise, respond to, report, record and refer any concerns about the welfare of an individual student as appropriate.

The College works closely with the Local Safeguarding Child Board (LSCB) a the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (RBKC) and other relevant agencies to assess, identify, and support students who could benefit from early help, are suffering harm or who may suffer harm without intervention. Such agencies may include the Police, Children’s Social Care (CSC) and health services. The College has consulted with the RBKC and other relevant agencies to update this policy. When the College is liaising with the RBKC the two main contacts are Kembra Healy (concerns relating to staff) and Hilary Shaw (concerns relating to students); where concerns relate to adult students the College will also liaise with Mary Wynne from RBKC. In addition, when concerns are related to Radicalisation or Prevent Duty the College will contact Tina Bencik. Their contact details are shown below:

Concerns about Staff
Tri-Borough Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) for referral and management of allegations against staff:
Kembra Healy
Safer Organisation Manager and Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO)
Tel: 07522 217 314
Email: kembra.healy@rbkc.gov.uk
If Kembra is unavailable you should ask to speak to the Duty Child Protection Advisor:
Tel: 020 7361 3013
Email: KCLADO.enquiries@rbkc.gov.uk
If the Duty Child Protection Advisor is unavailable, then you should contact Hilary Shaw (see below)
Concerns about Students
Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Training, Consultation and Advice for Schools and Education:
Hilary Shaw
Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Schools and Education Officer
Tel: 020 7598 4876
Mobile: 07817 365 519
Email: Hilary.Shaw@rbkc.gov.uk

Mary Wynne Safeguarding Adults Coordinator Safeguarding Adults Coordinator
Tel: 0207 361 2484
Mobile: 07973 124 491
Email: Mary.Wynne@rbkc.gov.uk
Concerns about Prevent and Radicalisation
Tri Borough Prevent Team, Guidance on Prevent Duty and Radicalisation for Schools and Education
Tina Bencik
Prevent Education Officer
Tel: 020 8753 5727
Mobile: 07977 470 316
Email: Tina.Bencik@lbhf.gov.uk

A full list of external agencies and other key non-Ashbourne contacts is provided in Appendix 5.

1.2 Related Policies
This policy works closely with a number of other important College policies, which include the following:

  • Acceptable Use of ICT Policy and Agreement
  • Administration of Medicine Policy
  • Anti-Bullying Policy
  • Student Behaviour and Attendance Policy
  • Complaints Policy
  • Data Protection Policy
  • E-safety Policy
  • Educational Visits Policy
  • Equal Opportunities Policy
  • Lanyard and ID Policy
  • Missing Student Policy
  • Risk Assessment Policy for Pupil Welfare
  • Safer Recruitment and Selection of Staff Policy
  • Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Policy
  • Staff Code of Conduct Policy
  • Whistleblowing Policy

1.3 Guidance
This policy has been developed having regard to a number of different guidance documents and legislation, with particular focus on the following Department for Education (DFE) guidance:

  • Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSIE – 2019)
    KCSIE also refers to the non-statutory advice for practitioners: What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused (March 2015)
  • Working Together to Safeguard Children (September 2018)
    This also refers to the non-statutory advice: Information sharing (July 2018)
  • The Revised Prevent duty guidance: for England and Wales (July 2015) (Prevent).
    Prevent is supplemented by non-statutory advice and a briefing note: The Revised Prevent duty: Departmental advice for schools and childminders (June 2015). The following guidance is also connected to the Prevent duty guidance – The use of social media for on-line radicalisation (July 2015)

A full list of the guidance this policy has referred to is shown in Appendix 6.

1.4 Important Definitions

Ashbourne Community – This refers to any employee at the College, Nominated Safeguarding Director (NSD), visitors, parents, guardians, volunteers and students.

CAHMS – Children and Adolescents Mental Health Services

CEOP – Child Exploitation and Online Protection Command

Child – Relevant legislation and guidance consistently makes reference to ‘child’ or ‘children’. As noted earlier, Ashbourne has students up to the age of 21. Therefore, where any statute or guidance makes reference to ‘child’, this policy will refer to ‘student’ as a reference to Ashbourne’s commitment to safeguarding all students.

However, when handling individual safeguarding cases the DSL will always consider carefully the age of the student in terms of any safeguarding decisions made. In these cases, the following shall be noted in reference to ‘child’, ‘ Young people aged 18+’ and ‘ Vulnerable Adult’:

  • Child – in accordance with The Children Act 1989, (and also in the Children Act 2004) and therefore in accordance with the law, the College shall regard any student below the age of 18 as a child.
  • Young people aged 18+ – may in some circumstances be regarded as vulnerable as a consequence of earlier life-experience and may therefore fall within the remit of The Children Act 1989. The College will take action based on individual situations; for example, where a student is over 18 but wishes to report abuse which took place when they were younger or if there are younger siblings in a family who are thought to be at risk.
  • Vulnerable Adult – is or may be in need of Community Care Services by reason of mental or other disability, age or illness and is, or may be, unable to take care of himself or herself, or unable to protect himself or herself against significant harm or serious exploitation. Vulnerability can apply to a wide range of disabilities and situations including those adults at risk owing to their caring role or family responsibilities. Vulnerability may be temporary or permanent. Individuals can become vulnerable when no previous conditions existed, for example if they become ill or they belong to a group with protected characteristics.

If the College receives information about an adult student (18 plus) which suggests that he/she has been abused or that it is likely they may be abused, it has a duty to refer these concerns to Adult Services and/or the Police. If the College is unsure whether a referral is necessary, the DSL will consult with appropriate agencies, which is usually Adult Care Services.

CSC – Children’s Social Care

DSL – Designated Safeguarding Lead

DDSL – Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead

LADO – Local Authority Designated Officer

LSCB – Local Safeguarding Children Board

MASH Team – Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub

NSD – Nominated Safeguarding Director

PT – Personal Tutor

RBKC – Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea

SEND – Special educational needs and disability

SLT – Senior Leadership Team

SMT – Senior Management Team

SRE – Sex and Relationship Education

TRA – Teaching Regulation Agency

UKCCIS – UK Council for Child Internet Safety

Staff Members – This refers to any employee at the College, whether that be the Principal or otherwise, volunteer or NSD.

1.5 Review of the Safeguarding Policy
The DSL will ensure that this policy, as well as other related safeguarding policies, are reviewed at the annual Safeguarding meeting that takes place each June. The NSD and Principal will attend this meeting and changes will require their approval.

Throughout the academic year the DSL will consult with staff as necessary, and during these discussions opportunities will be provided for staff to contribute to shape safeguarding arrangements. The DSL will also consider changes required as a result of any safeguarding incidents, new legislation or new guidance. This may lead to updates of the Safeguarding Policy throughout the academic year and reporting to the staff where appropriate.

All child protection incidents at the College will be followed by a review of these procedures by the DSL and a report will be made available to the Principal and the NSD. Where an incident involves a member of staff, the DSL will determine whether any improvements can be made to the College’s procedures. Any deficiencies or weaknesses in regard to child protection arrangements will be addressed and remedied.

2. Identifying Vulnerable Students and Signs of Abuse

2.1 Types and Signs of Abuse
To ensure that students are protected from harm, it is very important that the Ashbourne community understands what type of behaviour constitutes abuse. Abuse is a form of maltreatment of a student. Somebody may abuse or neglect a student by inflicting harm or by failing to act to prevent harm. Students may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, by others (e.g. via the internet). Abuse can take place wholly online, or technology may be used to facilitate offline abuse. Students may be abused by an adult or adults or by another student or students. Abuse can be:

  • physical abuse
  • emotional abuse
  • sexual abuse; and/or
  • neglect.

Further details of the types of abuse and possible signs of abuse are shown in Appendix 1.

2.2 Awareness of Vulnerable Students
Some students may be at increased risk of significant harm as a result of neglect and/or physical, sexual or emotional abuse. Many factors can contribute to an increase in risk. The College will give special consideration and attention to any student who:

  • does not speak English as their first language;
  • has a family member in prison;
  • has a SEND – this could include a pre-existing medical or mental health issue (e.g. PTSD or ACE – Adverse Childhood Trauma);
  • has poor attendance or is frequently missing / goes missing from care or from home;
  • identifies as either lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transsexual or queer (LGBTQ+);
    is a young carer;
  • is affected by known parental substance misuse or is misusing drugs or alcohol themselves;
  • is a affected by a parent(s) suffering with mental health problems or living in chaotic, neglectful and unsupportive home situations;
  • is an asylum seeker;
  • is a ‘looked after’ child (LAC) or a child in care or who has returned home to his/her family from care. This includes those who are subject to a care order or temporarily classed as looked after on a planned basis for short breaks or respite care;
  • is at risk of modern slavery, trafficking, radicalisation or exploitation;
  • is homeless;
  • is involved directly or indirectly in prostitution or child trafficking;
  • is in a private foster arrangement;
  • is living away from home;
  • is living in an identified domestic abuse situation;
  • is living in temporary accommodation;
  • is living a transient lifestyle;
  • is showing signs of abuse/neglect;
  • is showing signs of engaging in anti-social or criminal behaviour including gang involvement and association with organised crime groups;
  • is vulnerable to being bullied, or engaging in bullying;
  • is vulnerable to discrimination and maltreatment on the grounds of race, ethnicity, religion or sexuality;

2.3 Categories with Additional Focus
We think it is important to highlight a few categories in greater detail.

2.31 Has a SEND – Students with a SEND may not outwardly shown signs of abuse and/or may have difficulties in communication about abuse or neglect. These can include:

  • assumptions that indicators of possible abuse such as behaviour, mood and injury relate to the student’s disability without further exploration;
  • the potential for students with a SEND being disproportionally impacted by behaviours such as bullying, without outwardly showing any signs; and
  • communication barriers and difficulties in overcoming these barriers.

2.32 Has a family member in prison: Approximately 200,000 children have a parent sent to prison each year. These children are at risk of poor outcomes including poverty, stigma, isolation and poor mental health. NICCO provides information designed to support professionals working with offenders and their children, to help mitigate negative consequences for those children.

2.33 Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transsexual or Queer (LGBTQ+): Students who identify as LGBTQ+ can be targeted by their peers. In some cases, a student who is perceived by their peers to be a member of the LGBTQ+ community, whether they are or not, can be just as vulnerable as students who identify as LGBTQ+.

2.34 Homelessness: Being homeless, or at risk of homelessness presents a real risk to a student’s welfare. The College should be aware of potential indicators of homelessness including: household debt, rent arrears, domestic abuse and anti-social behaviour, as well as a family being asked to leave a property. If staff are made aware, or suspect that a student may be at risk of homelessness they should talk to the DSL in the first instance. Whilst referrals to the Local Housing Authority should be progressed as appropriate, and in accordance with local procedures, this does not and should not replace a referral to the LADO where a student has been harmed or is at risk of harm.

3. Procedures for handling Concerns about a Student
It is important that a student at risk or in need receives the right help at the right time to address risks and prevent issues escalating. It is therefore important that all staff understand their responsibility to: identify, act on and refer the early signs of abuse and neglect; keep clear written records; listen to the views of the student; reassess concerns when situations do not improve; share information quickly and challenge inaction. All staff at the College are expected to comply with statutory guidance Working Together to Safeguard Children (September 2018) unless exceptional circumstances arise. In particular, staff are expected to appreciate that effective safeguarding systems are those where:

  • the student’s needs are paramount, and the needs and wishes of the students are put first, so that every student receives the support they need before a problem escalates;
  • all staff who come into contact with students and families are alert to their needs and any risks of harm that individual abusers, or potential abusers, may pose to students;
  • all staff share appropriate information using the Filemaker database to log concerns in a timely way and will discuss any concerns about an individual student with the DSL, DDSL’s and the local authority CSC team where appropriate;
  • appropriately qualified, experienced staff are able to use their expert judgement to put the student’s needs at the heart of the safeguarding system so that the right solution can be found for each individual student;
  • all professionals contribute to whatever actions are needed to safeguard and promote a student’s welfare and take part in regularly reviewing the outcomes for the student against specific plans and outcomes.

3.1 What staff should do if they have a concern about a student
If staff have any concerns about a student (as opposed to a student being in immediate danger), they should initially log these concerns using the Safeguarding Share option in the Filemaker database system, which will automatically move the information into the secure Filemaker Safeguarding database. Information should include:

  • the date and time of the conversation;
  • the place of the conversation;
  • the essence of what was said and done by whom and in whose presence.

The information that is uploaded onto the Safeguarding database is secure and is only accessible to the DSL and the DDSL’s. The DSL and DDSL’s will also receive an email notification, without details of the incident, alerting them to check the Safeguarding database when a staff member logs an entry. If staff are to meet with the students individually, they should refer to clause 3.3 for additional advice about how to handle these conversations.

Staff should not assume that somebody else will take action and share information that might be critical to keeping students safe. If a student’s situation does not appear to be improving, the staff member should challenge any inaction and follow this up with the DSL.

If the staff member continues to stay involved in the process to support the student, they must ensure that concerns, discussions and decisions made, and the reasons for those decisions, are recorded and stored in the Safeguarding database.

Although staff can make a direct referral to CSC, due to Ashbourne’s small size, and the low number of referrals made by the College to the RBKC each year, the College has the resources to ensure that all correspondence to the local council comes directly, except in exceptional circumstances, from the DSL or DDSL’s in a timely manner. However, if anyone other than the DSL makes a referral, they should inform the DSL as soon as possible that a referral has been made. In these cases, after the referral has been made the DSL will follow things up.

3.11 DSL follow up to a concern being raised
After a staff member has logged their concerns about an individual student on the Ashbourne Safeguarding database, the DSL will read through the concern.

The DSL may also decide to meet with the staff member who logged the concern to gain a better understanding of the situation. Irrespective of the concern raised, the DSL will ensure that a follow up meeting is organised with the student. In most cases this meeting will be with the DSL. However, the College understands that students may respond better to different individuals, and, therefore, the DSL may well involve another member of staff to meet with the student. In these cases the DSL will follow-up with the member of staff to ensure a clear understanding of the concerns raised and that all information is logged onto the Safeguarding database.

During the individual meetings with the student, the DSL must decide whether a referral to CSC, early help or other support is appropriate, which must be done in accordance with the referral thresholds set by the LSCB. In addition, the College has five levels of need which it uses to categorise students on the Safeguarding database. The DSL will ascertain what level of need the student is at presently, and will take the appropriate action accordingly. The levels of need are as follows:

0 – No concern
1 – Mild concern
2 – In need
3 – At risk
4 – Referral

With each level, the DSL will put in place different action plans, which are detailed below:

0 – No Concern
If the DSL deems it necessary, a note will be sent to the teachers of this particular student to update them on the student’s situation and, where appropriate, relevant information will be shared.
The Safeguarding Team will no longer monitor the students progress as a result of the concern being raised.
The DSL will ensure that all notes are updated on the Safeguarding database. Reasons will be given as to why this student is no longer deemed a concern.

1 – Mild Concern
At the initial assessment meeting, or possibly thereafter, appropriate support will be put in place to support the student.
If the DSL deems it necessary, a note will be sent to the teachers of this particular student to update them on the student’s situation and, where appropriate, relevant information will be shared.
A follow up meeting will be organised at another point in the year to assess the student’s progress. Usually at this point, unless further concerns are raised, the student will be moved from Mild Concern to the No Concern category.
The DSL will ensure that all notes are updated on the Safeguarding database.

2 – In Need
At the initial assessment meeting, or possible thereafter, appropriate support will be put in place to support the student.
If the DSL deems it necessary, a note will be sent to the teachers of this particular student to update them on the student’s situation and, where appropriate, relevant information will be shared.
At minimum, a follow up meeting will be organised once per term.
At the subsequent follow-up meetings, the DSL will consider what additional support is required or whether the student needs to change into a different category.
The DSL will ensure that all notes are updated on the Safeguarding database.

3 – At Risk
At the initial assessment meeting appropriate support will be put in place to support the student.
If the DSL deems it necessary, a note will be sent to the teachers of this particular student to update them on the student’s situation and, where appropriate, relevant information will be shared.
At minimum, a follow up meeting will be organised once per half-term.
At the subsequent follow-up meetings, the DSL will consider what additional support is required or whether the student needs to change into a different category.
The DSL will ensure that all notes are updated on the Safeguarding database.

4 – Referral
At the initial assessment meeting appropriate support will be put in place to support the student.
If the DSL deems it necessary, a note will be sent to the teachers of this particular student to update them on the student’s situation and, where appropriate, relevant information will be shared.
This case will be followed up by the DSL on a daily basis to ensure that the College has completed all of the things that have been agreed to support this student. This may involve checking attendance, and communicating with external agencies, teachers, peers and family members who are involved in the situation.
The DSL will ensure that all notes are updated on the Safeguarding database.

If the DSL deems that a referral to the CSC is required, the DSL will take additional steps, which are outlined in 3.3. It should be noted that as a general policy at Ashbourne, whenever the DSL has a concern that a student is in immediate danger, the CSC would be contacted; dependent on the situation the initial discussion may be on a no-names basis to seek guidance.

3.2 What staff should do if a student is in danger or at risk of harm
If staff believe that a student is in immediate danger or at risk of harm, they must ensure that an immediate referral is made to the CSC and/or the Police. Although anyone can make a referral, the College has a very robust Safeguarding Team in place to handle these types of situations, and due to the small size of the College, the member of staff should immediately see the DSL or either of the DDSL’s to facilitate this process; only in exceptional circumstances should the individual staff member make a referral to the CSC without the DSL’s involvement. Staff should challenge any inaction and follow this up with the DSL and CSC as appropriate.

3.3 The Referral
A referral for a student that is in immediate danger or at risk of harm must be made immediately and in any event within 24 hours (one working day) of staff being aware of the risk. Parental consent is not needed for referrals to statutory agencies such as the police and CSC. If anyone other than the DSL makes a referral, they should inform the DSL as soon as possible that a referral has been made.

The local authority social worker should acknowledge receipt to the referrer within 24 hours and make a decision about the next steps and type of response required. Staff should challenge any inaction and follow this up with the DSL and the CSC as appropriate; the DSL should challenge any inaction with the CSC.

In addition, if after a referral the student’s situation does not appear to be improving the DSL should press for re-consideration to ensure their concerns have been addressed and, most importantly, that the student’s situation improves.

The DSL will continue to review the student’s case and determine whether the student needs to stay within Ashbourne’s Safeguarding Referral category (see 3.11). Irrespective of whether the student’s situation improves, once a student has met the criteria to be referred to the CSC, the DSL will continue to monitor the student’s progress throughout their time at Ashbourne. However, as the student continues to improve their Safeguarding category is likely to change, and, as a result, the frequency in which the DSL organises a check-in meeting with the individual will reduce.

Anyone involved in this process must ensure that concerns, discussions and decisions made, and the reasons for those decisions, are recorded and stored in the Safeguarding database.

Referrals following an allegation against a member of staff will be dealt with in accordance with the procedures set out in clause 4.

3.4 Advice for Staff when meeting with Students
It takes a lot of courage for a student to disclose that they are being neglected and/or abused. They may feel ashamed, particularly if the abuse is sexual, their abuser may have threatened what will happen if they tell, they may have lost all trust in adults, or they may believe, or have been told, that the abuse is their own fault. To help ensure the effectiveness of such interactions with students, the College encourages staff to do the following:

  • Listen carefully to the student and keep an open mind to the information being shared. The member of staff should not take a decision as to whether or not the abuse has taken place;
  • Not start their own investigation;
  • Not ask leading questions, i.e. a question which suggests its own answer. Instead, use TED (tell, explain, describe) to clarify the information shared;
  • Remain calm and not over-react to the information relayed by the student. Staff should note that the student may stop talking if they feel they are upsetting the person listening.
  • If the information shared by the student includes an online element, staff members should be aware of searching screening and confiscation advice and UKCCIS sexting advice. The key consideration is for staff not to view or forward illegal images of a student but to confiscate any device which they believe, with good reason, to have any such images stored on it, and pass the device immediately to the DSL.
  • Not to be afraid of silences – remember how hard this must be for the student.
  • At an appropriate time, tell the student that in order to help the safeguarding process information must be shared with the DSL.
  • Avoid admonishing the student for not disclosing earlier. Saying ‘I do wish you had told me about this when it started’ or ‘I can’t believe what I’m hearing’ may be your way of being supportive but the student may interpret that they have done something wrong.
  • Tell the student what will happen next. The student may agree to go with the staff member to see the DSL. If that is not the case, the staff member should let the student know that the DSL will follow-up with them asap.
  • Reassure the student that the allegation/complaint will be taken seriously.
  • All concerns, discussions and decisions (together with reasons) made should be shared with the DSL using the Safeguarding share option in the Filemaker Database system.
  • Know that they have a professional and legal responsibility to manage the requirement to maintain an appropriate level of confidentiality whilst at the same time liaising with relevant professionals such as the DSL and CSC. Take advice as necessary from the DSL if unsure about with whom information should be shared.
  • Seek support if feeling distressed.
  • Where the disclosure relates to harmful sexual behaviours, if possible the disclosure should be managed with two members of staff present; preferably one of them being the DSL or a DDSL.

3.5 Respecting the Student’s Wishes
Where there is a safeguarding concern, the College will ensure the student’s wishes and feelings are taken into account when determining what action to take and what services to provide. This is particularly important in the context of harmful behaviours, such as sexual harassment and sexual violence. The College always operates its processes with the best interests of the student at heart, to enable the student to achieve the best outcome. The DSL will consider carefully how to manage the student so that they are able to express their views and give feedback in the most supportive environment, and, therefore, the College respects that students may feel comfortable expressing their thoughts with different members of staff. However, dependent upon the age of the individual and the information being shared, the College may have to take action that is against the students’s wishes. In these cases the DSL will ensure they consult with CSC to ensure that the decisions made by the College are the most appropriate to support the student.

3.6 Context
All staff, but especially the DSL and DDSL’s, will consider the context in which safeguarding incidents and behaviour occur and how they can be associated with factors outside the College. This is known as contextual safeguarding, which simply means assessments of students should consider whether wider environmental factors are present in a student’s life that are a threat to their safety and/or welfare. The College will share as much information with CSC as possible as part of the referral process to enable consideration of all the available evidence and the full context of any abuse.

3.7 Safeguarding Supersedes Data Protection
Ashbourne spends a lot of time to ensure that it protects the data of individuals. For more information about how this works, please view the College’s Data Protection Policy. Nevertheless, in cases relating to Safeguarding it is important to note that Safeguarding supersedes Data Protection when it comes to important decisions.

The guidance, Information Sharing: Advice for Practitioners Providing safeguarding Services to Children, Young People, Parents and Carers, supports staff who have to make decisions about sharing information. Fears regarding sharing information under the Data Protection Act 2018 and the GDPR should not stand in the way of the need to promote the welfare, and protect the safety of students. If in doubt about what information can and should be shared, staff should speak to the DSL.

The College will co-operate with police and CSC to ensure that all relevant information is shared for the purposes of child protection investigations under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 in accordance with the requirements of Working together to safeguard children (September 2018).

3.8 Confidentiality
All staff understand that any matter relating to Safeguarding or child protection issues warrant a high level of confidentiality, not only out of respect for the student and staff involved but also to ensure that information being released into the public domain does not compromise evidence.

Staff must not promise the confidentiality of the information shared by the student and must always act in the best interests of the student. Concerns raised must be shared with the DSL and CSC where appropriate.

Staff should only discuss concerns directly with the DSL or DDSL’s or Principal. The Safeguarding Team will then decide who else needs to have access to the information and they will disseminate it on a ‘need-to-know’ basis.

3.9 Notifying Parents
The College will normally seek to discuss any concerns about a student with their parents. This must be handled sensitively and the DSL will normally make contact with the parent in the event of a concern, suspicion or disclosure.

However, if the College believes that notifying parents could increase the risk to the student or exacerbate the problem, then advice will first be sought from CSC. If the allegation involves a member of staff, the parents should only be informed with the LADO’s consent.

For the avoidance of doubt, referrals to CSC or the LADO do not require parental consent. Staff must act in the best interests of the student, even if this means making a referral against the parents’ wishes

3.10 Peer on Peer Abuse, including Bullying and Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment
All staff should be aware that safeguarding issues can often manifest themselves into peer-on-peer abuse. Please refer to clause 8.9 for further information about this.

4. Procedures for handling Allegations against Staff Members

4.1 What should Staff Members do if they have a concern about another Staff Member.
If staff have concerns about another staff member, this should be referred immediately to the DSL; this includes concerns about the Principal. The DSL will, where appropriate, consult with the LADO and other external agencies to seek further guidance.

4.2 When Procedures must be Followed
The College’s procedures for handling allegations made against staff members will be used when staff members have:

  • Behaved in a way that has harmed a student, or may have harmed a student;
  • Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a student; or
  • Behaved towards a student or students in a way that indicates he or she would pose a risk of harm to students.

Any allegations not meeting these criteria will be dealt with in accordance with the RBKC’s Local Safeguarding Children Board procedures. Advice from the LADO will be sought in borderline cases.

All such allegations must be dealt with as a priority without delay. However, no investigation will commence without the College first speaking to the LADO.

Allegations against a teacher who is no longer teaching and historical allegations will be referred to the police. Nevertheless, before doing so, the DSL will seek advice from the LADO.

4.3. Reporting an allegation against a staff member
Where an allegation or complaint is made against staff member, the matter should be reported immediately to the DSL, or in her absence a DDSL. The DSL will ensure that the allegation will be discussed immediately with the Principal before further action is taken.

Where an allegation or complaint is made against the Principal, the matter should be reported immediately to the NSD, without first notifying the Principal. The DSL will ensure that the allegation will be discussed immediately with the LADO before further action is taken. The DSL will also consult with the NSD, and vice versa.

Where an allegation is made against the DSL, the matter should be reported immediately to a DDSL, Principal or the NSD. If the matter is reported to the DDSL or NSD, they must ensure that the Principal is notified immediately. The Principal will ensure that the allegation will be discussed immediately with the LADO before further action is taken. The Principal will also consult with the NSD, and vice versa.

The person taking action in accordance with the procedures set out above, is know as the ‘case manager’. Invariably the case manager at Ashbourne will be the DSL except in cases when the allegation is made against the DSL.

4.4. Disclosure of information
The case manager will inform the accused person of the allegation as soon as possible after the LADO has been consulted.

The parents of the students involved will be informed of the allegation as soon as possible if they do not already know of it. They will also be kept informed of the progress of the case, including the outcome, but not the detail of any disciplinary process. The timing and extent of disclosures, and the terms on which they are made, will be dependent upon and subject to the laws on confidentiality and data protection and the advice of external agencies.

Where the LADO advises that a strategy discussion is needed, or the police or CSC need to be involved, the case manager will not inform the accused or the parents or carers until these agencies have been consulted and it has been agreed what information can be disclosed.

The reporting restrictions preventing the identification of a teacher who is the subject of such an allegation in certain circumstances will be observed.

4.5. Further action to be taken by the College
The College has a duty of care towards its employees and as such, it must ensure that effective support is provided for anyone facing an allegation. The College will take action in accordance with Part four of KCSIE (2019) and the College’s employment procedures.

4.6 Ceasing to use staff
If the College ceases to use the services of a staff member because they are unsuitable to work with children, a settlement/compromise agreement will not be used and a referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service will be made as soon as possible if the criteria are met. Any such incidents will be followed by a review of the safeguarding procedures within the College, with a report produced by the DSL and shared with the NSD, DDSL’s and Principal.

If a member of staff tenders their resignation, or ceases to provide their services, any child protection allegations will still be followed up by the College in accordance with this policy and a referral will be made to the Disclosure and Barring Service as soon as possible if the criteria are met.

Where a teacher has been dismissed, or would have been dismissed had they not resigned, separate consideration will be given as to whether a referral to the National College for Teaching and Leadership and the TRA should be made.

4.7. Unsubstantiated, false or malicious allegations
Where an allegation by a student is shown to have been deliberately invented or malicious, the Principal or Director of Studies will consider whether to take disciplinary action in accordance with the College’s Student Behaviour and Attendance Policy.

Where a parent has made a deliberately invented or malicious allegation the Principal or Director of Studies will consider whether to require that parent to withdraw their child or children from the College on the basis that they have treated the College or a member of staff unreasonably.

Whether or not the person making the allegation is a student or a parent (or staff member or other member of the public), the College reserves the right to contact the police to determine whether any action might be appropriate.

4.8. Record keeping
Details of allegations found to be malicious will be removed from personnel records.

For all other allegations, full details will be recorded on the confidential personnel file of the person accused. The record will be retained at least until the individual has reached normal pension age or for a period of ten years from the date of the allegation, if this is longer.

An allegation proven to be false, unsubstantiated or malicious will not be referred to in employer references. In accordance with KCSIE (2019), a history of repeated concerns or allegations which have all been found to be false, unsubstantiated or malicious will also not be included in any reference.

5. Procedures for Dealing with Concerns regarding the Safeguarding Practices in the College
When a member of the Ashbourne community has concerns about poor or unsafe practices and potential failures in the College’s safeguarding systems, these should be initially raised directly to the DSL or DDSL’s.

5.1 Whistleblowing
If staff feel unable to raise an issue with the staff members detailed above or feel that their genuine concerns are not being addressed, they should refer to the whistleblowing procedures which are set out in the College’s Whistleblowing Policy. This may result in the staff member using other whistleblowing channels, such as the NSPCC whistleblowing advice line (see Appendix 5).

There will be no disciplinary action taken against a member of staff for raising such a concern provided that it is done in good faith.

For further information please refer to the College’s Whistleblowing Policy.

5.2 Complaints about Safeguarding Practices from students and parents
All complaints and concerns will be considered carefully by the College and appropriate action will be taken in line with the College’s Complaints Policy. Where parental or student complaints raise safeguarding concerns about a member of staff, the person to whom the complaint was initially communicated must follow the procedure set out in clause 4.3, as well as follow the relevant procedures set out within the Complaints Policy.

Every student should feel able to raise concerns with a member of staff whom they trust. Staff who hear about concerns, suspicions or allegations from a student must relay the concerns immediately to the DSL or DDSL.

6. Management of Safeguarding – Pro-active Measures
The College aims to create an environment where students are safe to learn and develop. This section looks at what pro-active measures Ashbourne takes to ensure that the College safeguards its students effectively.

6.1 Induction

6.11 Staff Induction
To manage the students effectively, as part of their induction new members of staff will meet with the DSL to:

  • Go through this policy – this will focus on the following areas:
    • Staff responsibilities (see 7.1)
    • What to do if a safeguarding concern is raised and how to log a Safeguarding concern (see 3.1)
    • The role and identity of the DSL and DDSL’s (see appendix 2)
    • Key contextual Safeguarding issues that are relevant for Ashbourne
  • Go through part one of KCSIE and Annex A (2019);
  • Make them aware of other key policies that are connected to this policy (see 1.2)

New staff will also have to complete the following training before they are permitted to commence employment at the College:

  • Training on Mental Health and Resilience;
    Training on PREVENT;
  • Induction will be completed before a member of staff begins any work for the College that involves contact with students.

6.12 Student Induction
To ensure that students are familiar with the support on offer at Ashbourne, during their induction they will meet with either the DSL or a DDSL. During this meeting, the student will be informed about:

  • The key members of the Safeguarding Team.
  • What to do if they have any safeguarding concerns.
  • The Lanyard and ID Policy.
  • Student Behaviour and Attendance Policy.

6.2 Training

6.21 Staff Training
It is important that all staff have training to enable them to recognise the possible signs of abuse and neglect and to know what to do if they have a concern. In addition to the training they receive at induction, the DSL will ensure that all staff are given the necessary training to be able to fulfil their duties. This will include:

  • Attending the INSET day on the Friday before the first day of the Autumn Term. During this training session, staff will receive a refresher training session in key Safeguarding issues, including PREVENT.
  • The DSL and DDSL’s receive updated child protection training at least every two years to provide them with the knowledge and skills required to carry out their role. For more information about the training required for the DSL position, please refer to Appendix 2.
  • The NSD and the Principal will undertake appropriate training in accordance with the LSCB’s recommendations to fulfil their role and duties.

6.22 Student Council Training
The College believes it is critically important for the students to take an active role in safeguarding. To help facilitate this, in the Autumn Term the DSL will organise for all members of the Student Council to receive safeguarding training.

6.3 Meetings
There are a number of meetings that take place throughout the year that help to ensure that the College is taking pro-active measures to safeguard students.

6.31 Bi-Annual Safeguarding Meetings
The DSL, DDSL’s, NSD and Principal, as well as other members of the Safeguarding Team (refer to Appendix 4), meet a bi-annual basis (December and June). During these meetings, which are chaired by the DSL, the Safeguarding Team review events of the past six months.

The June meeting is also the Annual Safeguarding Meeting, where the DSL will ensure that all members of the Safeguarding Team attend.

6.32 Monthly SMT (Senior Management Team) Meetings
The Principal, NSD and Director of Studies (also a DDSL) have a monthly management meeting to review all aspects of the College. One of the key agenda points for this meeting is safeguarding. Any relevant points discussed in relation to safeguarding will be communicated to the DSL immediately after the conclusion of the meeting.

6.33 Personal Tutor Meetings
Each Wednesday a Personal Tutor meeting takes place between each of the Year 12 Personal Tutors. During this meeting a variety of issues are discussed to help support students, and safeguarding is a key agenda point. The Deputy Heads of Sixth Form (Amy Youngman and Sean Pillai) who chair these meetings, will ensure that at the end of the meeting any safeguarding concerns are immediately communicated to the DSL.

6.34 Head of Faculty Meetings
Regularly throughout the academic year, a Head of Faculty meeting takes place with heads from each of the eight facilities at the College. During these meetings a variety of issues are discussed to help support teachers to improve the provision of education offered to students. The DSL will attend these meetings to get updates on any safeguarding issues that are raised. The Leader of Faculties (James Wykes) who chairs these meeting, will ensure that, on occasions when the DSL is unable to attend, at the end of the meeting any safeguarding concerns are immediately communicated to her.

6.35 Daily Meetings/Communication
The DSL and Director of Studies (DDSL) communicate on a daily basis to discuss relevant safeguarding concerns.

6.36 Safeguarding Must Be an Agenda Point at All Meetings
The person responsible for chairing any meetings that take place at Ashbourne is expected to have safeguarding as one of the agenda points. At the end of the meeting, if any safeguarding concerns are highlighted these must be immediately communicated to the DSL.

6.4 Positive Promotion
Safeguarding will be promoted positively throughout College in a number of ways, including:

  • Relevant policies available on the College website, on the Student and Parent Portals and the Filemaker database system, which is accessible to all staff members.
  • Posters around the College provide key information to all members of the Ashbourne community about the College’s Safeguarding Team.

6.5 Early Intervention (Early Help)
Any student may benefit from early intervention but all staff should be particularly alert to the potential need for early help for a student who fits into the categories noted in clause 3.2.

Early intervention can take many forms, such as:

  • Home visiting programmes
  • College-based programmes
  • Mentoring schemes

At Ashbourne, early intervention mainly involves College-based programmes and mentoring schemes. This involves providing support as soon as a problem emerges. All staff should be aware of the early intervention process, and understand their role in it. This could include: identifying emerging problems, liaising with the DSL, sharing information with other professionals to support early identification and assessment and, in some cases, acting as the lead professional in undertaking an early help assessment. As discussed previously in this policy, due to the small size of Ashbourne, the expectation of the College is that the DSL will manage all of the early intervention programmes, however, the DSL may well delegate individual students to a DDSL, Personal Tutor or in certain cases teachers. In the case when the DSL delegates this responsibility to manage early intervention to another member of staff, she will continue to check-in with that individual to ensure that she is confident that the student’s case is being managed effectively.

All staff should be prepared to identify students who may benefit from early help, be aware of the early help process and understand their role in it. If early help is appropriate, the designated safeguarding lead should support staff in liaising with other agencies and setting up an inter-agency assessment as appropriate. If early help or other support is appropriate, the case should be kept under constant review and consideration given to a referral to CSC if the student’s situation does not appear to be improving.

Initially, staff who consider that a student may benefit from early intervention should discuss this with the College’s DSL, by logging their concern using the Safeguarding Share option on the Filemaker database, which the DSL will then follow up (see clause 3.11) and consider what type of additional support should be offered to the individual.

Effective early intervention relies upon:

  • Identifying students who would benefit from early intervention;
  • Undertaking an assessment of the need for early intervention; and
  • Providing targeted early intervention services to address the assessed needs of a student and, if applicable, their family which focuses on activities to improve the outcomes for that student.

Where a student and their family would benefit from coordinated support from more than one agency (e.g. education, health, police) there should be an inter-agency early help assessment. This should identify what help the student and their family require to prevent needs escalating to a point where intervention would be needed via a statutory assessment under the Children Act 1989. If Early Intervention is appropriate and where they are not taking the lead, the DSL will support the member of staff liaising with other agencies and setting up inter-agency Early Intervention assessment as appropriate.

Decisions as to who performs this role will be taken on a case-by-case basis and the College will consider carefully which member (s) of staff will be most effective for the individual student and their family.

For an Early Intervention assessment to be effective:

  • It should be undertaken with the agreement of the student and their parents or carers and should involve the student and their family as well as all of the professionals who are working with them;
  • A member of staff, invariably the DSL, should be able to discuss concerns they may have about a student and their family with a social worker in the local authority; and
  • If students and/or their parents do not consent to an early intervention assessment, then the DSL should make a judgment as to whether, without help, the needs of the student will escalate. If so, a referral to CSC may be necessary.

Effective early intervention involves the College (under the guidance of the DSL) providing high quality support as soon as possible, in cooperation with or coordinating with other agencies as appropriate, to help address the assessed needs of the student and their family, in order to significantly improve the outcomes for the student. However, each case should be kept under constant review, and consideration should be given to a referral to CSC if the student’s situation does not appear to be improving.

6.51 Reporting Sessions – Feedback about Student Progress
There are four reporting sessions throughout the year, which leads to further analysis about student performance. During this time, the College can see when students are underperforming and then seek to understand the reasons why that is the case. The DSL will communicate with all staff members to get updates on students at this stage to see if any students are eligible for early intervention. In particular the DSL will work closely with the Deputy Head of Administration who proof reads all reports.

6.52 Structure of the College
Due to the small class sizes (no more than 10 students), teachers are able to gain a better understanding about students, and, as a result, are more likely to identify any concerns in relation to safeguarding, in particular those students that are suitable for early intervention.

6.6 E-Safety
The College has appropriate filters and monitoring systems in place to safeguard students from potentially harmful and inappropriate online material. Further detail of the College’s approach to online safety can be found in the College’s E-Safety Policy.

The College adopts a whole College, holistic approach to online safety which (a) captures the range and complexity of the risks and of student’s experiences of those risks; (b) seeks to mitigate those risks as far as possible without depriving students of the significant benefits provided by technology and the internet; and (c) handles all cases of online harm appropriately and with sensitivity.
Students will use mobile devices and computers at some time. They are important tools for communication and education as well as for recreation and socialising. However, we know that some people will use these technologies to harm students. The harm might range from sending hurtful or abusive texts and emails (cyber-bullying), to enticing students to engage in sexually harmful conversations, webcam photography or face to-face meetings, radicalisation or sexual predation.

The breadth of issues classified within online safety is considerable, but can be categorised into three areas of risk:

  • Content: being exposed to illegal, inappropriate or harmful material – This includes but is not limited to (a) violent pornography or sexual images of children; (b) material promoting harmful behaviours such as self-harm or eating disorders; (c) propaganda or material promoting extremism, radicalisation and/or terrorism; (d) material showing or depicting extreme violence or brutality; and (e) social media such as Facebook and Instagram which can provide students with distorted and unrealistic images of others’ lives, causing some students to feel inadequate or distressed about their own lives.
  • Contact: being subjected to harmful online interaction with other users – This includes but is not limited to (a) cyber-bullying; and (b) contact from individuals seeking to groom students for the purposes of sexual abuse or radicalisation.
  • Conduct: personal online behaviour that increases the likelihood of, or causes, harm – This includes but is not limited to (a) responding to and engaging with individuals seeking to groom or abuse students; (b) youth produced sexual imagery.

Having assessed the level and nature of risk posed to our students, and bearing in mind the prevalence of online harm and abuse in the UK, we consider the risk of online harm to be material, particularly in relation to: cyber-bullying; harm caused by youth produced sexual imagery, internet pornography or on-line grooming; and harmful material promoting behaviours such as self-harm and eating disorders.

The College’s Staff Code of Conduct and Acceptable Use of ICT Policy and Agreement explain the responsibilities of staff in relation to keeping students safe in College.

The College will do all it reasonably can to limit students’ exposure to the above risks when using our own IT systems, by having in place appropriate filters and monitoring systems which are designed to protect students from online abuse without “over blocking” or imposing unreasonable restrictions as to what students can be taught through online education.

Students also receive guidance on safe use of the web (including anti-bullying) through the PSHEE curriculum in Year 11 and the Year 12 Personal Tutor groups (see 6.10).

Chat rooms and social networking sites are sources of risk of inappropriate and harmful behaviour in the digital arena. Some students will undoubtedly be ‘chatting’ on mobile or social networking sites at home.

Any student may suffer from online harm and all staff should be alert to the risk of it. Indicators that a student may be being abused or harmed online overlap with other indicators of abuse which can be found in Appendix 1.

If you suspect that a student may be at risk of or suffering from online harm, follow the procedures set out in clause 3 and discuss any concerns with the DSL immediately and an agreed course of action will be made in accordance with the procedures set out in this policy.

6.7 Educational Visits
The Educational Visits procedures are set out in the College’s Educational Visits Policy, and reflect the consideration given to the protection of our students when they are involved in educational trips and visits outside of the College’s premises.

Where extended College activities are provided by and managed by the College, the procedures set out within this policy apply. Where other organisations provide services or activities on our site the member of the College’s staff responsible for arranging the services or activities will check that the service or activity providers have appropriate procedures in place, including relevant risk assessments and safer recruitment procedures.

When our students attend off-site activities, including those abroad on educational trips, the College will check that effective child protection arrangements are in place. All staff are bound by the College’s Educational Visits Policy when arranging and organising off-site trips.

The DSL closely monitors the conduct of students and how staff manage these trips. Students and staff are asked for feedback following every trip that involves an overnight stay.

Please refer to our to the College’s Educational Visits Policy for further information.

6.8 Photography and Images
The vast majority of people who take or view photographs or videos of children do so for entirely innocent, understandable and acceptable reasons. Sadly, some people abuse children through taking or using images, so we must ensure that we have appropriate safeguards in place. To protect students, we will:

  • seek their and their parents’ consent for photographs to be taken or published (for example, on our website or in newspapers or publications);
  • when photographs of students are published, we use only the student’s first name with an image unless parents/students have consented for the student’s full name to appear next to the image;
  • ensure that students are appropriately dressed;
  • encourage students to tell us if they are worried about any photographs that are taken of them.

Further guidance for staff on the taking and storing of photographs and images of students is contained in the Staff Code of Conduct.

From time to time professional photographers are invited onto the College to take group photographs or pictures of significant events; any professional photographers hired by the College will be subject to appropriate vetting checks.

6.9 Premises
The College will take all practicable steps to ensure that the College premises are as secure as circumstances permit.

6.91 Security
Visitors are to report to reception where they will sign in and be handed a red lanyard with a Visitor ID card. Safety of our students, staff and visitors is a key priority and the lanyards and ID cards play a key role in keeping all members of the community safe at all times. All members of the Ashbourne Community receive a photo ID card with their name and picture, which must be clearly displayed and worn at all times whilst on the College premises. The College’s use of lanyards and ID cards allows staff and students to ascertain at a glance whether persons on site are members of the Ashbourne community. The College imposes a duty on all members of the Ashbourne community to immediately report any persons not wearing their lanyard to the relevant reception on site.

The Facilities Manager has also ensured that CCTV is installed on every floor. This enables the Reception Team to monitor the College premises more effectively and increases the chances of identifying those individuals not wearing a lanyard and ID card.

For further information, please visit the College’s Lanyard and ID Policy.

6.92 Natural Light
The College has been designed in such a way where lots of natural light comes into each classroom, which we believe helps to facilitate the learning experience. This also enables staff members to feel more comfortable having one-to-one meetings with students, and enables staff members to easily be able to see what students are doing in a room if left unattended.

6.10 Safeguarding Education
Students are taught how to keep themselves safe and build resilience to key issues (including radicalisation) through the Year 11 PSHEE and Year 12 Personal Tutoring classes.

As well as offering the students valuable support with their university application and A-Level studies, these programme allow the students to gain a greater depth of understanding and awareness about the following:

  • British Values
  • Building resilience
  • Peer-to-Peer Abuse
  • Radicalisation
  • Online safety

With online safety, cyber-bullying by students, via texts, direct messages, social media or email, will be treated as seriously as any other type of bullying and will be managed through our Anti-bullying policy. Students are educated about the risk of online harm – including youth produced sexual imagery, and the ways to mitigate those risks. The PT and PSHEE lessons will also aim to develop critical thinking and assessment skills to further enhance the students’ own ability in making safer, more informed decisions as to the material they access online and its validity.

The College produces blogs for both the PSHEE and Personal Tutoring classes, which are accessible to students and parents on the College website and in the Student and Parent Portals.

Through these sessions teachers will ensure that the students are reminded of the College’s Safeguarding procedures and the support available to them.

6.11 Looked After Children
The DSL ensures that staff have the skills, knowledge and understanding necessary to keep safe any students on roll who are looked after by a local authority.

The DSL is the designated member of staff who has responsibility for their welfare and progress. The College ensures that the designated member of staff, invariably the DSL, receives appropriate training in order to carry out their role.

6.12 Safer Recruitment
The College is committed to operating safer recruitment procedures in compliance with relevant legislation and guidance and in accordance with the College’s Safer Recruitment and Selection of Staff Policy.

Ashbourne spends a significant amount of time to ensure the right type of individual is selected to work at the College. In addition to the mandatory checks, different members of the SLT will meet with potential staff members to ensure that the College is confident that the individual can carry out their duties to a high standard and are suitable to work with young individuals.

The College ensures that all staff, including volunteers, have an appropriate DBS and other relevant checks to meet the requirements of the Single Central Record (SCR). For further information, please visit the College’s Safer Recruitment and Selection of Staff Policy.

6.13 Monitoring Attendance
The College’s Attendance Officer follows up carefully with student attendance each day. The Attendance Officer will follow-up on absences four times throughout the day, and report any concerns with regard to students in which she has safeguarding concerns directly to the DSL. Attendance meetings take place every two weeks, which are also attended by the DSL and at least one of the DDSL’s. For further information about how the College monitors attendance, please visit the College’s Student Behaviour and Attendance Policy.

6.14 Risk Assessments for Students
The DSL will carry out risk assessments for the following types of students:

  • Joining Year 13 as a new starter.
  • Joining the College when they are already 18 or over.
  • Entering into Year 12 or 13 when they are under the age of 16.

Each of these students will be met individually by the DSL, or another appropriate staff member selected by the DSL, and the information will be stored on Ashbourne’s Safeguarding database. As a result of these meetings, further tasks may need to be completed. Ordinarily these meetings will lead to the DSL to assign the student to either the ‘no concern’ or ‘mild concern’ category on our Safeguarding database (see clause 3.11). Where appropriate the DSL may also decide to inform the subject teachers with more information about these students.

6.15 Counselling
Ashbourne works with a counsellor, Rebeca Robertson, who provides support to both our students and staff members in a confidential setting. The information shared during these meetings are not discussed with the College. If staff or students wish to receive counselling, they must contact the DSL to take this forward.

For contact details of this counselling service, please refer to Appendix 5.

6.16 SEND Students
Fran Burns (DSL) is also the SENDCo at Ashbourne. She works closely with the Deputy SENDCo (Lee Kirby) and the Specialist SEND Assessor (Simone Shaw) to ensure that appropriate support is provided to those students who have a SEND.

For more information about the support Ashbourne provides to SEND students please refer to the College’s Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Policy.

6.17 Overseas and Independent Living Students
As they can be a potentially more vulnerable group, additional support meetings are organised for Overseas and Independent living students to address key issues such as registering with a GP and more information on safety and living in London. These session are co-ordinated by the DSL. Due to the potentially vulnerable nature of this students they will be logged onto Ashbourne’s Safeguarding database as a level 1 concern (see 3.11). After the initial meeting with the DSL, unless major concerns are raised students will generally be moved to a level 0 concern and their performance and general progress will be monitored by their PT.

7. Roles and responsibilities in Managing Safeguarding

7.1 All Staff
All staff are required to:

  • Have read and be familiar with this policy and be aware of systems, policies and procedures within the College which support safeguarding (See 1.2 Related Policies); this should be reviewed annually;
  • Have read, understood and be familiar with both Part 1 and Annex A of KCSIE (2019); this should be reviewed annually;
  • Immediately ensure that a direct referral is made to CSC (within one working day) if there is a risk of immediate serious harm to a student. Due to the small size of the College, and the dedicated Safeguarding Team, ensure in this case invariably means immediately informing the DSL or a DDSL.
  • After reporting a Safeguarding concern they must follow-up with the DSL and, where appropriate, the CSC to ensure that things have been followed up.
  • To keep the College informed (in particular DSL) on an on-going basis of any information that might have implications for the safeguarding of the students in the College. For example, where their relationships and associations both within and outside the workplace (including online) may have implications for the safeguarding of students at Ashbourne. This may include working with the DSL and, if required, support social workers to take decisions about individual students.
  • Use the Ashbourne Filemaker database to log any concerns about safeguarding issues relating to students;
  • Provide a safe environment in which students can learn, which includes ensuring that registers are completed immediately at the beginning of each class, and that students are wearing a lanyard at all times, and informing those members of the Ashbourne community on site not wearing a lanyard to immediately report to the reception of that building (see the Lanyard and ID policy for further information);
  • Be aware of the signs of abuse, neglect and radicalisation so that they are able to identify students who may be in need of extra help or who are suffering, or are likely to suffer, significant harm and in such circumstances to take appropriate action, working with other services as needed;
  • Be aware of groups of students which may be at greater risk (see clause 2.2);
  • Be aware of specific safeguarding issues, such as Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE), FGM, Children Missing Education (CME), radicalisation, Peer-on-Peer abuse and child criminal exploitation: county lines (refer to clause 8 for further details);
  • Attend the INSET day that will take place on the Friday before the start of the Autumn Term. During this training session, staff will receive PREVENT training, as well get a refresher training session on key safeguarding issues.
  • Complete required and relevant safeguarding training as directed by the DSL within the agreed time period, and keep up-to-date with any relevant safeguarding and child protection developments.

7.11. Abuse of Trust and Inappropriate Relationships
As a result of their knowledge, position and/or the authority invested in their role, all adults working with students are in positions of trust. A relationship between a member of staff and a student cannot be a relationship between equals. There is potential for exploitation and harm of vulnerable young people and all staff have a responsibility to ensure that an unequal balance of power is not used for personal advantage or gratification.

Staff should note that it is an offence for a person aged 18 or over and in a position of trust to (a) intentionally touch a child in a sexual way; (b) have a sexual relationship with a child, even if the relationship is consensual; (c) cause or incite a child to engage in sexual activity; (d) intentionally engage in sexual activity in the presence of a child; or (e) for the purposes of sexual gratification cause a child to watch a third person engaging in a sexual activity or look at an image or any person engaging in a sexual activity. A position of trust could arise even if the member of staff does not teach the student. A student for these purposes is a person under the age of 18. Note that Ashbourne does not condone any relationship between a member of staff and a student currently in education at the College, that involves the points a to e highlighted above, irrespective of the student’s age.

7.12 Good Practice Guidelines for Staff
In addition to their responsibilities, we have also highlighted the following Good Practice guidelines for staff:

  • All staff must behave responsibly and professionally in all dealings with students and specifically with students for whom they have a duty of care. All staff must follow the procedures set out in the College’s Staff Code of Conduct Policy, which includes guidance on one-to-one teaching, staff/student relationships and communication with students (e.g. via social media).
  • Staff should always avoid behaviour which might be misinterpreted by others, and report and record any incident with this potential immediately to the DSL.
  • Treating all students with respect;
  • Setting a good example by conducting themselves appropriately;
  • Encouraging positive and safe behaviour;
  • Being alert to changes in students behaviour and maintaining an attitude of ‘it could happen here’ where safeguarding is concerned;
  • Recognising that challenging behaviour may be an indicator of abuse;
  • Asking the students permission before doing anything for them which is of a physical nature (except where there is an urgent need to take action to protect them or to prevent them from harming others), such as assisting with dressing, physical support during PE or administering first aid;
  • Maintaining appropriate standards of conversation and interaction with students and avoiding and discouraging the use of inappropriate sexualised or derogatory language;
  • Ensuring students are encouraged to talk to staff members about any concerns, no matter how small they are and ensure that students feel comfortable doing so;
  • Being aware that the personal and family circumstances and lifestyles of some students lead to an increased risk of neglect and/or abuse.
  • Understand that assessments of students should consider whether wider environmental or contextual factors are present in a student’s life that are a threat to their safety and/or welfare (Contextual Safeguarding).
  • Understand the boundaries to employ with students in their day-to-day work, both to protect themselves and the young people in their care.

7.13 – Meeting Students on a One-to-One basis
All staff are aware of the potential risks (i.e. false allegations against staff) of meeting a young person alone, particularly if the young person has had an experience of sexual/emotional abuse. Due to the number academic interventions that take place at the College to improve student performance, one-to-one meetings is likely to be an integral part of a staff members role and they must exercise their own professional judgement and a degree of caution in these situations. All staff should try to ensure that they do not place themselves in any compromising situations, where allegations could potentially be made against them.

Suggested protective measures to consider include:

  • Staff members should ask another person (e.g. another staff member or a friend of the student – as appropriate to the content) to sit in on the meeting.
  • Staff member should sit in a room where it is possible to be observed through a window or glass‐panelled door. If the staff member is not clearly visible from outside the room, they should not close the door. If there is a blind in the room, the staff member should ensure that it is not down.
  • Unless in exceptional circumstances, staff/student meetings should always be conducted within normal College hours.

7.2 DSL and DDSLs
Fran Burns (DSL) takes lead responsibility for safeguarding and child protection (including online safety) at the College. As a member of the SLT, the DSL has the appropriate status and authority within the College to carry out the duties of this post. The DSL is given the time, funding, training, resources and support to provide advice and support to other staff on student welfare and child protection matters, to take part in strategy discussions and inter-agency meetings, and/or to support other staff to do so, and to contribute to the assessment of students.

The role principally involves:

  • Managing referrals
  • Working closely with external agencies, members of staff, students and parents to ensure the effective management of safeguarding at the College
  • Ensuring that she is up-to-date by taking relevant training
  • Raise awareness about safeguarding issues at the College
  • Ensure that all information in relation to safeguarding issues is stored safely on Ashbourne’s secure Safeguarding database.

The DSL is ably supported by her DDSL’s, Ruchi Agarwal and Lee Kirby. The DSL ensures that the DDSL’s are trained to the same standard as the DSL. Whilst the activities of the DSL can be delegated to her deputies, the ultimate lead responsibility for child protection, as set out above, remains with the DSL; this lead responsibility should not be delegated.

For further information about the DSL’s role, please refer to Appendix 2.

7.3 Students
Students have a key responsibility in terms of wearing a lanyard and ID card at all times when on the College premises. The lanyard should be worn around the neck, on the front of the body and on the outermost piece of clothing.

In addition, if a student identifies another individual on Ashbourne’s premises who is not wearing a lanyard and ID card, they must ask them to report to the reception of that building immediately. This is particularly true for students who are members of the Student Council, who must set an example for other students to follow.

Students are encouraged to raise any safeguarding concerns directly with the College. In the first instance they should contact either the DSL or DDSL’s. If students do not feel that their concerns are being taken seriously, they are welcome to contact outside agencies where appropriate (refer to contact details in Appendix 5).

7.4 Parents
Parents should raise any safeguarding concerns directly with the College. In the first instance they should contact either the DSL or DDSL’s. If parents do not feel that their concerns are being taken seriously, they are welcome to contact outside agencies where appropriate (refer to contact details in Appendix 5).

7.5 Nominated Safeguarding Director (NSD)
The NSD is Stephen Chang. He takes leadership of the College’s safeguarding arrangements on behalf of the Senior Management Team (SMT) and liaises with external agencies where this is required, including in the event of allegations of abuse made against the Principal.

The NSD will play an essential role in ensuring students are kept safe from harm. If the NSD is unavailable, his role and duties will be carried out by the Principal, except in a case where an allegation of abuse is made against the Principal himself. In these cases, the DDSL and Director of Studies, Lee Kirby, will undertake the NSD’s duties.

The NSD, Principal and Director of Studies will undertake appropriate training in accordance with the Local Safeguarding Children Board’s recommendations to fulfil the role and duties. The DSL will ensure that this takes place within the required timelines.

For a full description of the role and duties of the NSD, please refer to Appendix 3.

8. Specific Safeguarding Issues
All staff should have an awareness of specific safeguarding issues, some of which are covered within this section. Staff should be aware that behaviours linked to the likes of drug taking, alcohol abuse, truanting and sexting put students in danger.

8.1 Students Missing from Education
Students who go missing from education, particularly on repeat occasions, is a potential indicator of abuse or neglect. The College’s procedures for unauthorised absence and for dealing with students who go missing from education are set out within the College’s Student Behaviour and Attendance Policy, and the Missing Student Policy.

Where reasonably possible, Ashbourne will hold more than one emergency contact number for each student to provide the College with additional options to make contact with a responsible adult particularly when a student is missing from College for an extended period of time.

The College shall inform the local authority of any student who is going to be added to or deleted from the College’s admission register at non-standard transition points in accordance with the requirements of the Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006 (as amended). This will assist the local authority to:

  • fulfil its duty to identify students of compulsory school age who are missing from education; and
  • follow up with any student who might be in danger of not receiving an education and who might be at risk of abuse, neglect or radicalisation.

Attendance registers are carefully monitored to identify any trends on a daily basis. The College will report to the RBKC a student who fails to attend regularly or has been absent from College without permission for a continuous period of 10 College days or more. For further information about Ashbourne’s attendance procedures, please visit the College’s Student Behaviour and Attendance Policy.

8.1.1 Informing Parents
Parents will normally be kept informed as appropriate of any action to be taken under these procedures. However, there may be circumstances when the DSL will need to consult the Principal, CSC and / or the police before discussing details with parents.

However, as students get older, legislation recognises their right to make decisions about their own information and to express their wishes and preferences. If a student requests that their parent/carer is not informed of action to be taken under these procedures we will consider their request within the following confines:

  • Whether informing parents would put the student at increased risk of harm
  • Whether not informing parents would place the student at increased risk of harm
  • Whether the student has the capacity to understand the decision they are making
  • Whether any other students may be at risk of harm due to the information available to us
  • Whether there is sufficient cause to override the student’s wishes in the public interest.
  • The College will also receive advice from CSC where required.

In relation to Channel referrals, the DSL will consider seeking the consent of the student (or their parent/guardian) when determining what information can be shared. Whether or not consent is sought will be dependent on the circumstances of the case but may relate to issues such as the health of the individual, law enforcement or protection of the public.

8.2 ‘Honour based’ Violence
So-called ‘honour-based’ violence (HBV) encompasses crimes that have been committed to protect or defend the honour of the family and/or the community, including Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), forced marriage, and practices such as breast ironing. All forms of so-called HBV are abuse (regardless of the motivation) and should be handled and escalated as such. If in any doubts, staff should speak to the DSL. Professionals in all agencies, and individuals and groups in relevant communities, need to be alert to the possibility of a student being at risk of HBV, or already having suffered HBV.

There is a range of potential indicators that a student may be at risk of HBV. Guidance on the warning signs that FGM or forced marriage may be about to take place, or may have already taken place, can be found on pages 38-41 of the Multi agency statutory guidance on FGM (pages 59-61 focus on the role of schools and colleges) and pages 13-14 of the Multi-agency guidelines: Handling case of forced marriage.

To give an example of indications that a student has already been subjected to FGM:

  • They may have difficulty walking, sitting or standing and may even look uncomfortable.
  • They may have frequent urinary, menstrual or stomach problems or spend longer than normal in the bathroom due to difficulties urinating.
  • There may be prolonged or repeated absences from College and/or noticeable behaviour changes (e.g. withdrawal or depression) on the student’s return.
  • They may be reluctant to undergo medical examination.

8.21 Female Genital Mutilation
FGM comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs. It is illegal in the UK and a form of child abuse with long-lasting harmful consequences.

There is a range of potential indicators that a student may be at risk of FGM. Guidance on the warning signs that FGM may be about to take place, or may have already taken place, can be found on pages 38-41 of the Multi-agency statutory guidance on FGM (pages 59-61 focus on the role of schools).

There is a mandatory reporting duty for all staff members in respect of FGM. Where a staff member discovers (either through disclosure by the victim or visual evidence) that an act of FGM appears to have been carried out on a girl who is aged under 18, they must ensure that the matter is reported to the police. Therefore, members of staff must immediately inform the DSL or a DDSL and follow up to ensure that the matter has been reported to the police. Those failing to ensure that such cases are reported to the police will face disciplinary sanctions. It will be rare for a staff member to see visual evidence, and they should not examine students in this regard.

See the Home Office guidance for the Mandatory Reporting of FGM – procedural information for further details about the duty.

8.22 Forced Marriage
Forcing a person into a marriage is a crime in England and Wales. A forced marriage is one entered into without the full and free consent of one or both parties and where violence, threats or any other form of coercion is used to cause a person to enter into a marriage. Threats can be physical or emotional and psychological. A lack of full and free consent can be where a person does not consent or where they cannot consent (if they have learning disabilities, for example). Nevertheless, some communities use religion and culture as a way to coerce a person into marriage. Ashbourne can play an important role in safeguarding students from forced marriage.

There are a range of potential indicators that a student may be at risk of forced marriage. The Forced Marriage Unit has published Multi-agency guidelines: Handling cases of forced marriage. Pages 32-36 of this guidance focuses on the role of Colleges. Staff can also contact the Forced Marriage Unit if they need advice or information (refer to Appendix 5 for contact details).

If staff have a concern regarding a student that might be at risk of HBV they must also refer to the guidance in clause 3.2 of this policy.

8.3 Radicalisation
Radicalisation refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and forms of extremism. Extremism is vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. It can also call for the death of members of the armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.

There is no single way of identifying an individual who is likely to be susceptible to an extremist ideology. It can happen in many different ways and settings. Specific background factors may contribute to vulnerability which are often combined with specific influences such as family, friends or online, and with specific needs for which an extremist or terrorist group may appear to provide an answer. The internet and the use of social media in particular have become major factors in the radicalisation of young people. As with other safeguarding risks, staff should be alert to changes in student’s behaviour, which could indicate that they may be in need of help or protection. Staff should use their judgement to identify students who might be at risk of radicalisation and act proportionately, which may include making a referral to the Channel programme.

In accordance with the Department for Education Statutory Guidance 2015: Prevent Duty, the College recognises its duty to have due regard to the need to prevent students from being drawn into terrorism and adopts appropriate protocols to minimise the risk. The DSL is the designated Prevent Duty person responsible for co-ordinating action within the College and liaising with other agencies. Although the College assesses the risk to be low at present, the College will implement prevention measures such as applying appropriate restrictions to internet sites likely to promote terrorist and extremist materials, discussing these dangers with Students when appropriate in suitable forums, and undertaking Prevent awareness staff training periodically to ensure that staff are able to identify students at risk and know how to intervene.

The DSL will also assess and manage appropriately any risks identified in the vicinity of the College, including those posed by any visiting speakers.

8.31 What staff should do if a child is seen as at risk of radicalisation
Staff should follow the College’s normal referral processes when there are concerns about students who may be at risk of being drawn into terrorism, as set out above (see clause 3). This may include a referral to Channel or CSC depending on the level of risk. If staff believe that a student is in immediate/significant risk of being drawn into terrorism, they must ensure that an immediate referral is made to the CSC and/or the Police. As stipulated in clause 3.2, although anyone can make a referral, the College has a very robust Safeguarding Team in place to handle these types of situations, and due to the small size of the College, the member of staff should immediately see the DSL or either of the DDSL’s to facilitate this process; only in exceptional circumstances should the individual staff member make a referral to the CSC without the DSL’s involvement. Staff should challenge any inaction and follow this up with the DSL and CSC as appropriate.

The DSL, in recognition that students may be at risk of being drawn into terrorism or other forms of extremism, ensures that the College carries out appropriate risk assessments (following consultation with local partners, such as the Police) of the potential risks in the local area. Such risk assessments are discussed with the Head, NSD and DDSL’s to ensure the College’s safeguarding arrangements are sufficiently robust to help prevent and protect students from being drawn into terrorism and are regularly revised.

8.4 Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)
CSE is a form of sexual abuse where children are sexually exploited for money, power or status. It can involve violent, humiliating and degrading sexual assaults. In some cases young people are persuaded or forced into exchanging sexual activity for money, drugs, gifts, affection or status. Consent cannot be given, even where a child may believe they are voluntarily engaging in sexual activity with the person who is exploiting them. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact and can happen online. A significant number of children who are victims of sexual exploitation go missing from home, care and education at some point. What marks out exploitation is an imbalance of power in the relationship. The perpetrator always holds some kind of power over the victim which increases as the exploitative relationship develops. Sexual exploitation involves varying degrees of coercion, intimidation or enticement, including unwanted pressure from peers to have sex or sexual bullying including cyberbullying and grooming. However, it also important to recognise that some young people who are being sexually exploited do not exhibit any external signs of this abuse. Some of the following signs may be indicators of sexual exploitation:

  • Students who appear with unexplained gifts
  • Students who associate with other young people involved in exploitation;
  • Students who have older boyfriends or girlfriends;
  • Students who suffer from sexually transmitted infections or become pregnant; who suffer from changes in emotional well-being;
  • Students who misuse drugs and alcohol;
  • Students who go missing for periods of time or regularly come home late; and who regularly miss school or education or don’t take part in education.

Any concerns that a student is being or is at risk of being sexually exploited should be communicated without delay to the DSL. The College is aware that a student may not be able to recognise the coercive nature of the abuse and may not see themselves as a victim. Consequently, the student may resent what they perceive as interference by staff. However, staff must act on their concerns as they would for any other victim of abuse.

8.5 Private Fostering
Children being privately fostered are required by law to be seen by a social worker. If a member of staff or volunteer becomes aware that a student may be in a private fostering arrangement, where a student under the age of 16 (or 18 if disabled) is provided with care and accommodation by someone to whom they are not related in that person’s home, they should raise this in the first instance with the DSL. The DSL will then contact CSC to seek further advice. As many of our students will live in different boroughs, the DSL will be required to consult with the CSC team for the particular borough where the student currently resides. The DSL will check that the arrangements are suitable and safe for the student and this is likely to involve follow up meetings with CSC.

For further information about private fostering, pleas refer to government advice on private fostering – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/children-act-1989-private-fostering.

8.6 Domestic Abuse
The cross-government definition of domestic violence and abuse is:
Any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive, threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are, or have been, intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality. The abuse can encompass, but is not limited to: psychological; physical; sexual; financial; and emotional.

Exposure to domestic abuse and/or violence can have a serious, long lasting emotional and psychological impact on children. In some cases, a student may blame themselves for the abuse or may have had to leave their family home as a result. Domestic abuse affecting young people can also occur within their personal relationships, as well as in the context of their home life. Domestic Abuse may lead to other safeguarding concerns, and should therefore be managed under this policy.

8.7 Peer-on-Peer Allegations of Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment
Sexual violence and sexual harassment can occur between two students of any age and gender. It can also occur through a group of students sexually assaulting or sexually harassing another student or group of students. Students who are victims of sexual violence and sexual harassment will likely find the experience stressful and distressing. This will, in all likelihood, adversely affect their educational attainment. Sexual violence and sexual harassment exist on a continuum and may overlap, they can occur online and offline (both physical and verbal) and are never acceptable. It is important that concerns raised by all victims are taken seriously and are offered the appropriate support. Staff should be aware that some groups are potentially more at risk. Evidence shows girls, students with SEND and students who identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community are at greater risk. Staff should be aware of the importance of:

  • Making clear that sexual violence and sexual harassment is not acceptable, will never be tolerated and is not an inevitable part of growing up;
  • Not tolerate or dismiss sexual violence or sexual harassment as “banter”, “part of growing up”, “just having a laugh” or “boys being boys”; and
  • Challenging behaviours (potentially criminal in nature), such as grabbing bottoms, breasts and genitalia, flicking bras and lifting up skirts. Dismissing or tolerating such behaviours risks normalising them.

The College recognises that students with a SEND can be more prone to peer on peer group isolation than other students and will consider extra pastoral support accordingly. The DSL, who is also the SENDCo at Ashbourne, will meet with each of these students and ensure that they receive the appropriate levels of support. For more information about the support Ashbourne provides to SEND students please refer to the College’s Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Policy.

The College minimises the risk of peer on peer abuse in a number of ways, including through the PSHEE Year 11 programme and the Year 12 Personal tutoring programme. Within the scheme of work for these taught classes, lessons include: healthy relationships, as per SRE education guidance, anti-bullying and online safety.

Where an issue of student behaviour or bullying gives ‘reasonable cause to suspect that a student is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm’, staff should follow the procedures set out in clause 3 of this policy.

A student against whom an allegation of abuse has been made may be neutrally suspended from the College during the investigation. The College will take advice from CSC on the investigation of such allegations and will take all appropriate action to ensure the safety and welfare of all students involved including the alleged victim and perpetrator. If it is necessary for a student to be interviewed by the Police in relation to allegations of abuse, the College will ensure that, subject to the advice of CSC, parents are informed as soon as possible and that the students involved are supported during the interview by an appropriate adult and until the investigation is completed. Confidentiality will be an important consideration for the College and advice will be sought as necessary from CSC and other external agencies (e.g. the Police) as appropriate.

Where an allegation of sexual abuse, exploitation or grooming is made against a student, both the victim and the alleged perpetrator will be treated as being at risk and safeguarding procedures in accordance with this policy will be followed.

In the event of disclosures about peer-on-peer abuse, all students involved (both victim and perpetrator) will be treated as being at risk, and safeguarding procedures in accordance with this policy will be followed. Victims will be supported by the DSL and support from external agencies will be sought, as appropriate.

When there has been a report of sexual violence, the DSL will make an immediate risk and needs assessment. Where there has been a report of sexual harassment, the need for a risk assessment should be considered on a case-by-case basis. The risk and needs assessment should consider:

  • the victim;
  • the alleged perpetrator; and
  • the other students (and, if appropriate, staff) at the College.

Risk assessments will be recorded and kept under review. In relation to a report of sexual violence or sexual harassment, the DSL will reassure any victim that they are being taken seriously and that they will be supported and kept safe. The victim will never be given the impression that they are creating a problem by reporting sexual violence or sexual harassment; nor would a victim ever be made to feel ashamed for making a report. The DSL will consider the risks posed to students and put adequate measures in place to protect them and keep them safe. This may include consideration of the proximity of the victim and alleged perpetrator and considerations regarding shared classes, and sharing College premises.

It is important that staff members are aware of sexual violence and the fact that students can, and sometimes do, abuse their peers in this way. When referring to sexual violence we are referring to sexual offences under the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

What is consent? Consent is about having the freedom and capacity to choose. Consent to sexual activity may be given to one sort of sexual activity but not another. Consent can be withdrawn at any time during sexual activity and each time activity occurs. Someone consents to sexual activity only if he/she agrees by choice to that particular sexual act and has the freedom and capacity to make that choice.

Sexual Harassment: this means ‘unwanted conduct of a sexual nature’ that can occur online and offline. Sexual harassment is likely to: violate a student’s dignity, and/or make them feel intimidated, degraded or humiliated and/or create a hostile, offensive or sexualised environment.

Whilst not intended to be an exhaustive list, sexual harassment can include:

  • Sexual comments, such as: telling sexual stories, making lewd comments, making sexual remarks about clothes and appearance and calling someone sexualised names;
  • Sexual “jokes” or taunting;
  • Physical behaviour, such as: deliberately brushing against someone, interfering with someone’s clothes (it has to be considered when any of this crosses a line into sexual violence – it is important to talk to and consider the experience of the victim) and displaying pictures, photos or drawings of a sexual nature; and
  • Online sexual harassment. This may be standalone, or part of a wider pattern of sexual harassment and/or sexual violence. It may include:
  • Non-consensual sharing of sexual images and videos;
  • Sexualised online bullying;
  • Unwanted sexual comments and messages, including, on social media; and sexual exploitation; coercion and threats.

8.8 The sharing of youth produced sexual imagery (sexting)
The practice of students sharing images and videos via text message, email, social media or mobile messaging apps has become commonplace. However, this online technology has also given students the opportunity to produce and distribute sexual imagery in the form of photos and videos. Such imagery involving anyone under the age of 18 is illegal.

Sexting refers to both images and videos where:

  • A person under the age of 18 creates and shares sexual imagery of themselves with a peer under the age of 18;
  • A person under the age of 18 shares sexual imagery created by another person under the age of 18 with a peer under the age of 18 or an adult; and
  • A person under the age of 18 is in possession of sexual imagery created by another person under the age of 18.

All incidents of this nature should be treated as a safeguarding concern and in line with the UKCCIS guidance ‘Sexting in schools and colleges: responding to incidents and safeguarding young people’.

Cases where sexual imagery of people under 18 has been shared by adults and where sexual imagery of a person of any age has been shared by an adult to a child is child sexual abuse and should be responded to accordingly.

If a member of staff becomes aware of an incident involving sexting they should follow the safeguarding procedures outlined in clause 3 and refer this information immediately to the DSL. The member of staff should confiscate the device involved and set it to flight mode or, if this is not possible, turn it off. Staff should not view, delete, copy or print the imagery.

The DSL should hold an initial review meeting with appropriate staff members and subsequent interviews with the students involved (if appropriate). Parents should be informed at an early stage and involved in the process unless there is reason to believe that involving parents would put the student at risk of harm. At any point in the process if there is concern a young person has been harmed or is at risk of harm, staff should follow the procedures set out in clause 3 of this policy. This will involve the DSL contact CSC to make referrals where appropriate.

Immediate referral at the initial review stage should be made to CSC if:

  • the incident involves an adult;
  • there is good reason to believe that a young person has been coerced, blackmailed or groomed or if there are concerns about their capacity to consent (for example, owing to special education needs);
  • what is known about the imagery suggests the content depicts sexual acts which are unusual for the child’s development stage or is violent;
  • the imagery involves sexual acts;
  • the imagery involves anyone aged 12 or under; and there is reason to believe a child is at immediate risk of harm owing to the sharing of the imagery, for example the child is presenting as suicidal or self-harming.

If none of the above applies then the DSL will use their professional judgement to assess the risk to students. This may involve consultation with CSC, other external agencies (e.g. the Police) and members of the Safeguarding Team.

In applying judgement the DSL will consider if:

  • there is a significant age difference between the sender/receiver;
  • there is any coercion or encouragement beyond the sender/receiver;
  • the imagery was shared and received with the knowledge of the child in the imagery;
  • the child is more vulnerable than usual i.e. at risk;
  • there is a significant impact on the children involved;
  • the image is of a severe or extreme nature;
  • the child involved understands consent;
  • the situation is isolated or if the image been more widely distributed;
  • there other circumstances relating to either the sender or recipient that may add cause for concern i.e. difficult home circumstances;
  • the children have been involved in incidents relating to youth produced imagery before.

If any of these circumstances are present the situation will be escalated according to our safeguarding procedures, including reporting to the police or CSC. Otherwise, the situation will be managed within the College.

The DSL will log all incidents of sexting, including both the actions taken, actions not taken, reasons for doing so and the resolution, onto Ashbourne’s Safeguarding database.

8.9 Child criminal exploitation (county lines): Criminal exploitation of children is a geographically widespread form of harm that is a typical feature of county lines criminal activity: drug networks or gangs groom and exploit children and young people to carry drugs and money from urban areas to suburban and rural areas, market and seaside towns. Key to identifying potential involvement in county lines are missing episodes, when the victim may have been trafficked for the purpose of transporting drugs and a referral to the National Referral Mechanism should be considered. Like other forms of abuse and exploitation, county lines exploitation:

  • can affect any child or young person (male or female) under the age of 18 years;
  • can affect any vulnerable adult over the age of 18 years;
  • can still be exploitation even if the activity appears consensual;
  • can involve force and/or enticement-based methods of compliance and is often accompanied by violence or threats of violence;
  • can be perpetrated by individuals or groups, males or females, and young people or adults; and is typified by some form of power imbalance in favour of those perpetrating the exploitation. Whilst age may be the most obvious, this power imbalance can also be due to a range of other factors including gender, cognitive ability, physical strength, status, and access to economic or other resources.

8.10 Children and the court system
Students are sometimes required to give evidence in criminal courts, either for crimes committed against them or for crimes they have witnessed. There are age appropriate guides to support students (12-17 year olds) available on the gov.uk website.

The guides explain each step of the process and support and special measures that are available. There are diagrams illustrating the courtroom structure and the use of video links is explained.

Making child arrangements via the family courts following separation can be stressful and entrench conflict in families. This can be stressful for children. The Ministry of Justice has launched an online child arrangements information tool with clear and concise information on the dispute resolution service. The College may refer some parents and carers to this service where appropriate.

8.11 Children with harmful behaviour
There will be occasions when student’s behaviour warrants a response under child protection rather than anti-bullying procedures. All such instances must be reported to the DSL and will be dealt with in accordance with the procedures set out in clause 3.

The management of children and young people with harmful behaviour (including sexually harmful behaviour) can be complex and the College will work with other relevant agencies to maintain the safety of the whole College community. Young people who display such behaviour may be victims of abuse themselves and the child protection procedures will be followed for both victim and perpetrator – i.e. all students involved will be treated as being “at risk”.

Students against whom an allegation of abuse has been made may be neutrally suspended from the College during the investigation. The College will take advice from CSC on the investigation of such allegations and will take all appropriate action to ensure the safety and welfare of all students involved including the students accused of abuse.

If it is necessary for a student to be interviewed by the police in relation to allegations of abuse, the College will ensure that, subject to the advice of CSC, the student’s parents are informed as soon as possible and that the student is supported during the interview by an appropriate adult. In the case of students whose parents are abroad, subject to separately satisfied risk assessments for the student and an identified Education Guardian, the student’s Education Guardian will be requested to provide support to the student and to accommodate them if it is necessary to suspend them during the investigation.

Appendix 1 – Signs and Types of Abuse
All College staff should be aware that abuse, neglect and safeguarding issues are rarely standalone events that can be covered by one definition or label. In most cases, multiple issues will overlap with one another.

A1.1 Physical abuse: a form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

A1.2 Emotional abuse: the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone.

A1.3 Sexual abuse: involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children. Sexual abuse also includes sexual violence and sexual harassment which can occur between two children of any sex. They can also occur through a group of children sexually assaulting or sexually harassing a single child or group of children. Sexual violence are sexual offences under the Sexual Offences Act 2003, such as rape, sexual assault and assault by penetration. Sexual harassment is ‘unwanted conduct of a sexual nature’ that can occur online and offline. Sexual harassment is likely to violate a child’s dignity, and/or make them feel intimidated, degraded or humiliated and/or create a hostile, offensive or sexualised environment. Sexual harassment can include sexual comments, such as telling sexual stories, making lewd comments, making sexual remarks about clothes and appearance and calling someone sexualised names; sexual “jokes” or taunting; physical behaviour, such as deliberating brushing against someone, interfering with someone’s clothes and displaying pictures, photos or drawings of a sexual nature; and online sexual harassment, which might include non-consensual sharing of sexual images and videos and sharing sexual images and videos (both often referred to as sexting); inappropriate sexual comments on social media; exploitation; coercion and threats. Online sexual harassment may be standalone, or part of a wider pattern of sexual harassment and/or sexual violence.

A1.4 Neglect: the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

A1.5 Psychological abuse – includes emotional abuse, threats of harm or abandonment, deprivation of contact, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion, harassment, verbal abuse or isolation.

A1.6 Self-neglect – is not a direct form of abuse but staff need to be aware of it in the general context of risk assessment/risk management and to be aware that they may owe a duty of care to a vulnerable individual who places him/herself at risk in this way. Risk to self and/or others – This may include but is not exclusive to self-harm, suicidal tendencies or potential risk of harming others, which may or may not include children. This may be as a consequence of an individual experiencing a significant level of personal, emotional trauma and/or stress and mental health issues.

A1.7 Discriminatory abuse – includes racism, sexism or discrimination based on a person’s disability. Financial or material abuse – includes theft, fraud, exploitation, pressure in connection with wills, property, enduring power of attorney, or inheritance or financial transactions, or the inappropriate use, misuse or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits. Safeguarding – includes promotion of health and well-being as well as protection of specific individuals.

A1.8 Teenage relationship abuse – Teenage relationship abuse is a pattern of actual or threatened acts of physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse, perpetrated by an adolescent (between the ages of 13 and 18) against a current or former partner. Abuse may include insults, coercion, social sabotage, sexual harassment, threats and/or acts of physical or sexual abuse. The abusive teen uses this pattern of violent and coercive behaviour, in a heterosexual or same gender relationship, in order to gain power and maintain control over the partner. This abuse may be child sexual exploitation.

Appendix 2: Role of the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL)
When compiling this role, the College has referred directly to the KCSIE (2019) document.

Fran Burns is the DSL at the College and she is a member of the Senior Leadership Team (SLT). She takes lead responsibility for safeguarding and child protection (including online safety) at the College. She has the appropriate status and authority within the College to carry out the duties of this post. The DSL is given the time, funding, training, resources and support to provide advice and support to other staff on student welfare and child protection matters, to take part in strategy discussions and inter-agency meetings, and/or to support other staff to do so, and to contribute to the assessment of students.

A2.1 Deputy Designated Safeguarding Leads (DDSL)
The College has two DDSLs, Ruchi Agarwal and Lee Kirby. The DDSLs at Ashbourne are trained to the same standard as the DSL and their role is explicit in their job description. Whilst the activities of the DSL can be delegated to appropriately trained deputies, the ultimate lead responsibility for child
protection, as set out above, remains with the DSL, this lead responsibility should not be delegated.

A2.2 Managing Referrals
The DSL is expected to:

  • refer cases of suspected abuse to the local authority children’s social care as required;
  • support staff who make referrals to local authority children’s social care;
  • refer cases to the Channel programme where there is a radicalisation concern as required;
  • support staff who make referrals to the Channel programme;
  • refer cases where a person is dismissed or left due to risk/harm to a child to the Disclosure and Barring Service as required; and
  • refer cases where a crime may have been committed to the Police as required.

A2.3 Work with others
The designated safeguarding lead is expected to:

  • act as a point of contact with the RBKC and any other related outside agencies;
  • liaise with the principal to inform him of issues – especially ongoing enquiries under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 and police investigations;
    as required, liaise with the “case manager” and the LADO for child protection concerns in cases which concern a staff member;
  • liaise with staff (especially pastoral support staff, Facilities Team, and members of the SEND Team) on matters of safety and safeguarding (including online and digital safety) and when deciding whether to make a referral by liaising with relevant agencies; and
  • act as a source of support, advice and expertise for all staff.

2.4 Training
The DSL (and any deputies) will undergo training to provide them with the knowledge and skills required to carry out the role. This training will be updated at least every two years. The DSL will undertake Prevent awareness training.

In addition to the formal training set out above, their knowledge and skills should be refreshed (this might be via e-bulletins, meeting other DSL’s, or simply taking time to read and digest safeguarding developments) at regular intervals, as required, and at least annually, to allow them to understand and keep up with any developments relevant to their role so they:

  • understand the assessment process for providing early help and statutory intervention, including local criteria for action and local authority children’s social care referral arrangements;
  • have a working knowledge of how local authorities conduct a child protection case conference and a child protection review conference and be able to attend and contribute to these effectively when required to do so;
  • ensure each member of staff has access to, and understands, the College’s Safeguarding Policy and procedures, especially new and part time staff;
  • are alert to the specific needs of children in need, those with special educational needs and young carers;
  • understand relevant data protection legislation and regulations, especially the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation.
  • understand the importance of information sharing, both within the College, and with the three safeguarding partners, other agencies, organisations and practitioners;
  • are able to keep detailed, accurate, secure written records of concerns and referrals understand and support the school or college with regards to the requirements of the Prevent duty and are able to provide advice and support to staff on protecting children from the risk of radicalisation;
  • are able to understand the unique risks associated with online safety and be confident that they have the relevant knowledge and up to date capability required to keep children safe whilst they are online at school or college;
  • can recognise the additional risks that children with SEN and disabilities (SEND) face online, for example, from online bullying, grooming and radicalisation and are confident they have the capability to support SEND children to stay safe online;
  • obtain access to resources and attend any relevant or refresher training courses and encourage a culture of listening to children and taking account of their wishes and feelings, among all staff, in any measures the school or college may put in place to protect them.

A2.5 Raise Awareness
The designated safeguarding lead should:

  • ensure the school’s or college’s child protection policies are known, understood and used appropriately;
  • ensure the school’s or college’s child protection policy is reviewed annually (as a minimum) and the procedures and implementation are updated and reviewed regularly, and work with governing bodies or proprietors regarding this;
  • ensure the child protection policy is available publicly and parents are aware of the fact that referrals about suspected abuse or neglect may be made and the role of the school or college in this and link with the safeguarding partner arrangements to make sure staff are aware of any training opportunities and the latest local policies on local safeguarding arrangements.

A2.6 Child protection file
Where children leave the school or college the designated safeguarding lead should ensure their child protection file is transferred to the new school or college as soon as possible. This should be transferred separately from the main pupil file, ensuring secure transit, and confirmation of receipt should be obtained. Receiving schools and colleges should ensure key staff such as designated safeguarding leads and SENCOs or the named person with oversight for SEN in colleges, are aware as required.

In addition to the child protection file, the designated safeguarding lead should also consider if it would be appropriate to share any information with the new school or College in advance of a child leaving. For example, information that would allow the new school or college to continue supporting victims of abuse and have that support in place for when the child arrives.

In line with our GDPR policy, all child protection files will be held by the College until the students’ 25th birthday, when they will be destroyed.

A2.7 Availability
During term time the designated safeguarding lead (or a deputy) should always be available (during school or college hours) for staff in the school or college to discuss any safeguarding concerns. Whilst generally speaking the designated safeguarding lead (or deputy) would be expected to be available in person, it is a matter for individual schools and colleges, working with the designated safeguarding lead, to define what “available” means and whether in exceptional circumstances availability via phone and or Skype or other such media is acceptable. It is a matter for individual schools and colleges and the designated safeguarding lead to arrange adequate and appropriate cover arrangements for any out of hours/out of term activities.

Appendix 3: Role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director
The NSD is Stephen Chang. He takes leadership of the College’s safeguarding arrangements on behalf of the Senior Management Team and liaises with external agencies where this is required, including in the event of allegations of abuse made against the Principal.

The NSD will play an essential role in ensuring students are kept safe from harm. If the NSD is unavailable his role and duties will be carried out by the Principal, except in a case where is an allegation of abuse made against the Principal. In these cases, the DDSL and Director of Studies, Lee Kirby, will undertake his duties.

The NSD and the Principal will undertake appropriate training in accordance with the Local Safeguarding Children Board’s recommendations to fulfil the role and duties.

The main role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director are to:

  • Be familiar with the LSCB guidance and procedures relating to safeguarding and child protection and associated issues, and to attend training for nominated safeguarding and child protection governors, where available;
  • Ensure that the SMT put in place a suitable safeguarding and child protection policy and associated procedures which have regard to regulations and standards issued by the Secretary of State for Education (DfE) in accordance with section 94 of the Education and Skills Act 2008 and sections 29 and 38 of the Counter- Terrorism and Security Act 2015 and associated regulations;
  • Champion safeguarding and child protection issues within the College;
  • Encourage members of the SMT and SLT to develop their understanding of the SMT and SLT responsibilities with regard to child protection and assist them to perform their functions in respect of safeguarding children and young people;
  • Contribute to ensuring any deficiencies in the College’s safeguarding practices which may be brought to the SMT’s attention by a member of College staff, a parent, an officer of the local authority or from any other source are addressed;
  • Meet regularly with the College’s DSL in order to monitor the effectiveness of the College’s Safeguarding Policy and the implementation of the policy and procedures in the College. Meetings will take place, at minimum, on a termly basis;
  • Ensure that the SMT receive an annual report on the implementation of the College’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures from the DSL;
  • Ensure that the DSL is part of the College’s senior leadership team, and has sufficient time and resources at their disposal to carry out their duties effectively;
  • Ensure that a DDSL is identified;
  • Ensure that the DSL and DDSL receive the necessary training at least every two years – and keep updated on all new training aspects related to Safeguarding or Child Protection at least annually;
  • Ensure that training in child protection is provided to all staff, including Lunch Time Supervisors, administrative staff and other ancillary staff, in accordance with the Local Safeguarding Children Board recommendations with at least annual updates;
  • Ensure that arrangements are in place for the inclusion of child protection training on the College’s procedures in an induction programme for all people working in the College, no matter for how long, nor the status of that individual;
  • Ensure arrangements are in place to ensure safer recruitment procedures and appropriate checks are undertaken on all new staff and volunteers and to carry out a check of the College’s Single Central Register on at least an annual basis;
  • Be aware of how safeguarding and child protection issues are addressed through the curriculum and to take responsibility at Governor level to ensure that pupils are taught about safeguarding and given guidance on adjusting behaviour to reduce risks including the safe use of electronic devices and the internet, building resilience to protect themselves and their peers, and provided with information about who they should turn to for help within in the College;
  • To provide information to the local authority about how the Board of Directors’ duties in respect of safeguarding and child protection have been discharged if requested.

The Nominated Safeguarding Director will liaise with the Principal and the local authority regarding all confidential child protection issues involving allegations against staff.

Where there is an allegation of abuse against the Principal, the Nominated Safeguarding Director will take the lead in liaising with the local authority and/or other partner agencies including:

  • Notifying the designated officer of the local authority immediately before any action is taken;
  • Ensuring, with local authority support, that appropriate action is taken in accordance with agreed Local Safeguarding Children Board procedures;
  • Attending initial and subsequent strategy meetings as required if other agencies are involved;
  • Taking the lead in an investigation (when the Principal is unable to do so) under the College’s internal employment procedures when the other agencies’ involvement is at an end or as soon as it is confirmed that this may take place;
  • Taking the lead in reviewing the College’s child protection and safeguarding policies and procedures with the Designated Safeguarding Lead, taking advice from the designated officer of the local authority, and making the necessary changes;
  • By sound use of all available data as indicated above, ensuring mechanisms are in place to enable staff, visitors and volunteers understand their responsibilities for safeguarding and child protection as outlined in KCSIE (2019).

Appendix 4

Position Name
Designated Safeguarding Lead Ms. Frances Burns
Email: Frances.Burns@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Safeguarding Mobile: 07578 548537
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead Mrs. Ruchi Agarwal
Email: Ruchi.Agarwal@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead Mr. Lee Kirby
Email: Lee@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Safeguarding Mobile: 07951 510 224
Principal Mr. Mike Kirby
Email: Mike.Kirby@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Nominated Safeguarding Director and
Management Consultant
Mr. Stephen Chang
Email: Stephen@Changclan.com
Tel: +44 (0) 7785 732 428
Assistant to the Head of Middle School Ms. Blaize Campbell
Email: Blaize@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Deputy Head of Sixth Form Mr. Sean Pillai
Email: Sean@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Deputy Head of Sixth Form Mrs. Amy Youngman
Email: Amy@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Assistant Director of Studies and Leader of Faculties Mr. James Wykes
Email: James.Wykes@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Admissions Officer Mr. Marcus Louden
Email: Marcus@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Head of Administration Mrs. Hien Nguyen
Email: Hien@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Deputy Head of Administration Ms. Georgina Pritchard
Email: Georgina.Pritchard@AshbourneCollege.co.uk
Head of Facilities Mr. Fabio Carpene
Email: Fabio@AshbourneCollege.co.uk

Appendix 5

Concerns about Staff
Tri-Borough Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) for referral and management of allegations against staff:
Kembra Healy
Safer Organisation Manager and Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO)
Tel: 07522 217 314
Email: kembra.healy@rbkc.gov.uk
If Kembra is unavailable you should ask to speak to the Duty Child Protection Advisor:
Tel: 020 7361 3013
Email: KCLADO.enquiries@rbkc.gov.uk
If the Duty Child Protection Advisor is unavailable, then you should contact Hilary Shaw (see below)
Concerns about Students
Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Training, Consultation and Advice for Schools and Education:
Hilary Shaw
Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Schools and Education Officer
Tel: 020 7598 4876
Mobile: 07817 365 519
Email: Hilary.Shaw@rbkc.gov.uk
Mary Wynne Safeguarding Adults Coordinator Safeguarding Adults Coordinator
Tel: 0207 361 2484
Mobile: 07973 124 491
Email: Mary.Wynne@rbkc.gov.uk
Concerns about Prevent and Radicalisation
Tri Borough Prevent Team, Guidance on Prevent Duty and Radicalisation for Schools and Education
Tina Bencik
Prevent Education Officer
Tel: 020 8753 5727
Mobile: 07977 470 316
Email: Tina.Bencik@lbhf.gov.uk
Prevent Team at RBKC
Email: prevent3@rbkc.gov.uk
Department for Education
Non Emergency Number: 020 7340 7264
Email: counter.extremism@education.gsi.gov.uk
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Social Services Child Protection Services
Tel: 020 7361 3013 (24 hours)
Email: socialservices@rbkc.gov.uk
Sarah Stalker
Family Support and Child Protection Adviser
Tel: 020 7598 4640
Mobile: 07971 322 482
Email: sarah.stalker@rbkc.gov.uk
*Specialism: Child Sexual Exploitation (Monday/Tuesday and Wednesday only)
Rupinder Virdee
Family Support and Child Protection Adviser
Mobile: 07989 155 271
Email: rupinder.virdee@rbkc.gov.uk
Angela Clayton
Family Support and Child Protection Adviser (Wednesday to Friday)
Mobile: 07807 159 907
Email: angela.clayton@rbkc.gov.uk
Sarah Mangold
Tri-borough Safeguarding Practice Lead
Mobile: 07984 016 841
Email: sarah.mangold@rbkc.gov.uk
NSPCC Whistleblowing Advice Line Address: Weston House, 42 Curtain Road London, EC2A 3NH
Tel: 0800 028 0285
Email: help@nspcc.org.uk
Disclosure and Barring Service Address: PO Box 181, Darlington, DL1 9FA
Tel: 01325 953795
Email: dbsdispatch@dbs.gsi.gov.uk
Teaching Regulation Agency Address: 53-55 Butts Road, Earlsdon Park, Coventry, CV1 3BH
Tel: 0207 593 5393
Email: misconduct.teacher@education.gov.uk
OFSTED Safeguarding Children Tel: 0300 123 4666 (Monday to Friday from 8am to 6pm)
Email: whistleblowing@ofsted.gov.uk
Independent Schools Inspectorate Tel: 0207 6000100
Email: concerns@isi.net
Forced Marriage Unit Tel: 020 7008 0151
Email: fmu@fco.gov.uk
Tri-Borough Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) Esohoe Erhahon
Education Lead, Tri-Borough MASH
Telephone: 020 7641 5026
Email: eerhahon@westminster.gov.uk
Childline 0800 1111
NSPCC Anne Longfield OBE
Children’s Commissioner
Tel1: 0808 800 5000
Tel2: 0800 528 0731
Tel3: 0203 299 6900
Email: info.request@childrenscommissioner.gsi.gov.uk
College approved counsellor Rebeca Robertson
Email:  Rebeca.Robertson@AshbourneCollege.co.uk

Tel: 07946 381 024
Sexual Assault Guidance The Havens
Tel: 020 3299 6900
Web: https://www.thehavens.org.uk/

Appendix 6: Guidance

  • 157 Prevent Toolkit Children Act 1989
  • Advice to schools and colleges on gangs and youth violence – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/advice-to-schools-and-colleges-on-gangs-and-youth-violence
  • Are you worried about online sexual abuse or the way someone has been communicating with you online? – https://www.ceop.police.uk/safety-centre/
  • Channel Duty Guidance: Protecting vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorism (2015) Multi-agency statutory guidance on FGM (2016)
  • Child abuse linked to faith or belief: national action plan – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-action-plan-to-tackle-child-abuse-linked-to-faith-or-belief
  • Children missing Education (2016)
  • Children’s Plan 2007 Colleges
  • Contest (The National Counter-Terrorism Strategy)
  • Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015
  • Dealing with allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff – Department for Education 2012
  • DfES Safeguarding Children in Education
  • Domestic abuse: how to get help – https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-abuse-how-to-get-help
  • Drugs: advice for schools – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/drugs-advice-for-schools
  • Eating disorders – https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk
  • Education Act 2011
  • Employment 35/13-protected cautions and convictions further advice, AOC, July 2013
  • Equality and Diversity Act 2010
  • Guidance for Safer Working Practice for Adults who Work with Children and Young People in Education Settings (DCSF 2009)
  • Independent Safeguarding Authority, 2009
  • Information sharing: advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services (July 2018)
  • Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSIE – 2019)
  • London Child Protection Guidelines (Updated May 2018)
  • NSPCC – Guidance on Child Protection Records
  • Prevent Cloud Instructions and Guidelines
  • Preventing Bullying – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/preventing-and-tackling-bullying
  • Revised Prevent duty guidance: for England and Wales (July 2015)
  • Revised Prevent duty: Departmental advice for schools and childminders (June 2015)
  • Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education (DfES 2010)
  • Safeguarding children in whom illness is fabricated or induced – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safeguarding-children-in-whom-illness-is-fabricated-or-induced
  • Safeguarding children from forced marriages
  • Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006
  • Safer Practice, Safer Learning (NIACE 2007)
  • Sefton – A coordinated response to self-harm in children and young people 2008
  • Sefton LSCB – Multi-Agency Threshold Pathway to Provision Handbook 2015
  • Self-harm – https://www.surreycc.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/14527/Recognising-and-managing-self-harm-and-suicidal-behaviour.pdf
  • The mental health strategy for England – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-mental-health-strategy-for-england
  • The Protection of Children in England – the Government Response to Lord Laming, 2009
  • The UKCCIS (UK Council for Child Internet Safety) Guidance: Sexting in schools and colleges, responding to incidents, and safeguarding young people (2017) will be followed.
  • The use of social media for on-line radicalisation (July 2015)
  • Vetting and Barring Scheme – Update.
  • What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused: advice for practitioners (2015)
  • Working together to Safeguard Children (September 2018)