Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures

September 5, 2016

 

Policy Contents

 

College Contacts
  1. Policy statement and aims
  2. The Designated Safeguarding Lead
  3. Duty of staff, Directors and volunteers
  4. Procedures
  5. Secure College premises
  6. Confidentiality and information sharing
  7. Monitoring and review
  8. Relevant Safeguarding Contacts.

Appendix 1: The Designated Safeguarding Lead
Appendix 2: Types and signs of abuse
Appendix 3: Guidance for staff and volunteers on suspecting or hearing a complaint of abuse.
Appendix 4: Whistleblowing Procedures: Dealing with allegations against members of staff, the Principal Directors or volunteers
Appendix 5: Role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director

Designated Safeguarding Lead

 

Fran Burns

Email frances.burns@ashbournecollege.co.uk
Tel: 0207 937 3858
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead

 

Lee Kirby

Email lee.kirby@ashbournecollege.co.uk
Tel: 0207 937 3858 Ext 227
Principal

 

Mike Kirby

Email mike.kirby@ashbournecollege.co.uk
Tel: 0207 937 3858 Ext 232
Chair

 

Stephen Chang

Email stephen@changclan.com
Tel:  +44 (0) 7785 732 428 
Nominated Safeguarding Director Email : Stephen@changclan.com
Tel: +44 (0) 7785 732 428

1. Policy statement

1.1 Ashbourne College’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures (the Policy) has regard to statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education (September 2016) and Working Together to Safeguard Children (March 2015) ‘What to do if you think a child is being abused’ (2015) 
‘Information Sharing’ (2015) 
and Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales (2016), and as reflected by directives laid out in APPENDIX 6 and:

1.1.1 has been authorised by the Directors of the College;

1.1.2 is published on the College website and available in hard copy to parents on request;

1.1.3 can be made available in large print or other accessible format if required; [• and]

1.1.4 its procedures apply to all staff, volunteers, students and visitors whilst on site, or wherever staff, visitors, students or volunteers are working with us even where this is away from the College, for example an educational visit.

1.2 The underlying ethos of this policy adheres not only to Government and all statutory requirements, but is underpinned by Ashbourne’s own value statement that “Students Come First.”

Every pupil should feel safe and protected from any form of abuse. To this end, Ashbourne College is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. It is a direct aim of Ashbourne to create an environment where students are safe to learn and develop, to raise student awareness of safeguarding issues and equip them with the skills needed to keep them safe. This will be delivered through a varied and broad based curriculum, including Online training resources. At Ashbourne we consider it imperative that all students should feel listened to and supported .We will always act in the best interest of the child.

To fulfil our safeguarding duties, the College will take all reasonable measures to:

1.2.1 ensure that we practise safer recruitment in checking the suitability of staff and volunteers (including staff employed by another organisation) to work with children and young people in accordance with: the guidance given in Keeping Children Safe in Education (September 2016) and the Education (Independent College Standards) Regulations 2014. See also the College’s separate [● Safer Recruitment Policy];

1.2.2 ensure that where staff from another organisation are working with our pupils on another site, we require written confirmation that appropriate safer recruitment checks and procedures have been completed on those staff;

1.2.3 follow the local inter-agency procedures of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Local Safeguarding Children Board;

1.2.4 be alert to signs of abuse both in the College and from outside and to protect each pupil from any form of abuse, whether from an adult or another pupil;

1.2.5 deal appropriately with every suspicion or complaint of abuse and to support children who have been abused in accordance with his / her agreed child protection plan;

1.2.6 design and operate procedures which, so far as possible, ensure that teachers and others who are innocent are not prejudiced by false allegations;

1.2.7 be alert to the needs of children with physical and mental health conditions;

1.2.8 operate robust and sensible health and safety procedures and operate clear and supportive policies on drugs, alcohol and substance misuse;

1.2.9 assess the risk of children or adults being drawn into terrorism, including support for extremist ideas that are part of terrorist ideology, based on an understanding of the potential risk in the local area;

1.2.10 identify children or adults who may be vulnerable to radicalisation, and know what to do when they are identified;

1.2.11 teach pupils about safeguarding, for example through use of online resources, through the curriculum and PSHE, together with guidance on adjusting behaviour to reduce risks including the safe use of electronic devices and the internet, building resilience to protect themselves and their peers, and information about who they should turn to for help (see also the College’s [• policy on the acceptable use of IT and e-safety]);

1.2.12 take all practicable steps to ensure that College premises are as secure as circumstances permit;

1.2.13 consider and develop procedures to deal with any other safeguarding issues which may be specific to individual children in the College or in the local area; and

1.2.14 have regard to regulations and standards issued by the Secretary of State for Education (DfE) in accordance with section 94 of the Education and Skills Act 2008 and sections 29 and 38 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 and associated regulations.

1.3. Keeping children safe in education defines safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children as protecting children from maltreatment; preventing impairment of children’s health or development; ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care; and taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes. The Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales emphasises that the duty to have due regard to the need to prevent children from being drawn into terrorism is an aspect of safeguarding. Being drawn into terrorism includes not just violent extremism but also non-violent extremism, which can create an atmosphere conducive to terrorism and can popularise views which terrorists exploit. Colleges should be safe spaces in which children and young people can understand and discuss sensitive topics, including terrorism and the extremist ideas that are part of terrorist ideology, and learn how to challenge these ideas.

1.4. Keeping children safe in education provides that the inspection of independent schools will ensure that the Independent School Standards which concerns the welfare, health and safety of children are met.

1.5 Related policies

1.5.1 The following policies and procedures are also relevant to the College’s safeguarding practices:

(a) [• Staff Code of Conduct]

(b) [• Whistleblowing Policy]

(c) [• Safer Recruitment Policy]

(d) [• Anti-bullying Policy]

(e) [• E-safety and Acceptable Use of ICT Policy]

(f) [• Missing Pupil Policy]

(g) [• Policy on the administration of medicines and supporting pupils with medical conditions]

(h) [• Policy on behaviour and attendance] 

2.The Designated Safeguarding Lead

2.1. The College’s Directors have appointed a member of staff of the College’s senior leadership team with the necessary status and authority (Designated Safeguarding Lead / DSL) to be responsible for matters relating to child protection and welfare.

2.2. The Designated Safeguarding Lead shall be given the time, funding, training, resources and support to enable him/her to support other staff on safeguarding matters, to contribute to strategy discussions and/or inter-agency meetings and to contribute to the assessment of children.

2.3. Parents are welcome to approach the Designated Safeguarding Lead if they have any concerns about the welfare of any child in the College. If preferred, parents may discuss concerns in private with the child’s personal tutor or the Principal who will notify the Designated Safeguarding Lead in accordance with these procedures.

2.4. The name and contact details of the Designated Safeguarding Lead are set out in the College Contacts list at the front of this Policy. They, together with the main responsibilities of the Designated Safeguarding Lead, are also set out in Appendix 1.

2.5. If the Designated Safeguarding Lead is unavailable his / her duties will be carried out by the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead. The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead ‘s details are also set out in the College Contacts list and in Appendix 1. In this Policy, reference to the Designated Safeguarding Lead includes the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead where the Designated Safeguarding Lead is unavailable.

3. Duty of staff, Directors and volunteers

3.1. All staff, Directors and volunteers of the College are under a general legal duty:

3.1.1 to protect children from abuse and safeguard and promote their welfare;

3.1.2 to be aware of the terms and procedures in this Policy and to follow them;

3.1.3 to know how to access and implement the procedures in this Policy, independently if necessary;

3.1.4 to make a sufficient record of any significant complaint, conversation or event in accordance with this Policy; and

3.1.5 to report any matters of concern to the Designated Safeguarding Lead.

3.2 The Directors ensure that the College’s safeguarding arrangements take into account the procedures and practice of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board. The Directors have nominated one of its members to take leadership of the College’s safeguarding arrangements on behalf of the Board and to liaise with external agencies where this is required, including in the event of allegations of abuse made against the Principal or a member of the Board of Directors. The Nominated Safeguarding Director is Stephen Chang. See the roles and responsibilities of the Nominated Safeguarding Director set out in Appendix 5.

3.3 The Directors and College leaders will ensure mechanisms are in place to enable staff and visitors / volunteers to understand their responsibilities for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of pupils, as described in Keeping children safe in education (2016). This will include monitoring the College’s data to ascertain whether the policy and procedures are effective, whether concerns are raised appropriately and in timely manner, the impact of Child Protection / safeguarding training, etc.

3.4 The Directors and college leaders are dedicated to ensuring children are taught about safeguarding, including online, through teaching and learning opportunities, as part of providing a broad and balanced curriculum and through informal curricular activities. In particular, we teach pupils how to:

  • recognise and manage risks in different situations and then decide how to behave responsibly
  • understand healthy and unhealthy relationships and issues of choice and consent;
  • judge what kind of physical contact is acceptable and unacceptable
  • recognise when pressure from others (including people they know) threatens their personal safety and wellbeing and develop effective ways of resisting peer pressure.

We recognise that children with SEN or disabilities may be at increased risk of abuse; we endeavour to make the safeguarding curriculum accessible to all our pupils.

3.5 Training

3.5.1 Induction

(a) All staff, including temporary staff and volunteers, will be provided with induction training that includes:

(i) this Policy;

(ii) the staff Code of Conduct including the Whistleblowing procedure;

(iii) the role of the Designated Safeguarding Lead and his / her identity and contact details together with that of and his / her Deputy;

(iv) child protection training in accordance with RBKC Safeguarding Children Board procedures; and

(v) a copy of Part 1 of Keeping children safe in education and, if in direct contact with pupils, annex A.

3.5.2 Child protection training

(a) All staff including the Principal will receive a copy of this policy and Part 1 and annex A of Keeping children safe in education 2016, and will be required to confirm that they have read these. Training will be provided to support staff understanding of their Safeguarding responsibilities and identifying key indicators of abuse.

(b) The Principal and all staff members will undertake appropriate child protection training which will be updated every year and following consultation with the RBKC Local Safeguarding Children Board. Training will include guidance on the duties of staff in relation to both children in need and children at risk of harm.

(c) Staff development training will also include training on online safety.

(d) The Nominated Safeguarding Director and the Chair will receive appropriate training to enable them to fulfil their safeguarding responsibilities, as set out in Appendices 5 and 6.

3.5.3 Designated Safeguarding Lead

(a) The Designated Safeguarding Lead and Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead have undertaken child protection training and training in inter-agency working, and will attend refresher training at two-yearly intervals, with regular updates at least annually. For further details about the training of the Designated Safeguarding Lead, see Appendix 1.

(b) All training will be carried out in accordance with Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board procedures. Prevent duty training will be consistent with Home Office advice

4. Procedures

4.1 Concerns about abuse

4.1.1 Every concern or suspicion of abuse from within or outside the College will be taken seriously and action taken in accordance with this policy.

4.1.2 The child protection training provided to staff considers the types and signs of abuse staff should be aware of. Further details are set out in Appendix 2.

4.1.3 If a member of staff is concerned that a pupil may be at risk of, or suffering, harm, the matter should be referred to the Designated Safeguarding Lead without delay. If a member of staff suspects abuse or receives a disclosure, the procedures set out in Appendix 3 must be followed. See paragraph 4.3 and Appendix 4 for the procedures for dealing with allegations against staff and volunteers.

4.1.4 If, at any point, there is a risk of immediate serious harm to a child a referral should be made to children’s social care immediately. Anybody can make a referral. If the child’s situation does not appear to be improving the staff member with concerns should press for re-consideration.

  • 1.5 All staff should understand what to do if they have a concern about a child (as opposed to believing the child to be in danger or at immediate risk of harm). College staff are well placed to identify children who would benefit from ‘early help’ and should understand that they may be asked to contribute to any assessments.

4.2 Action by the Designated Safeguarding Lead

4.2.1 On being notified of a disclosure or suspicion of abuse, the action to be taken by the Designated Safeguarding Lead will take into account:

(a) The local inter-agency procedures of the RBKC Local Safeguarding Children Board;

(b) where relevant, local information sharing protocols relating to Channel referrals;

(c) the nature and seriousness of the suspicion or concern. A complaint involving a serious criminal offence, including the identification of someone who may already be engaged in illegal terrorist-related activity, will always be referred to children’s social care and, if appropriate, the police;

(d) the child’s wishes or feelings; and

(e) duties of confidentiality, so far as applicable.

4.2.2 Generally, a decision to make a child protection (s47) referral to children’s social care will be discussed with the pupil and their parents / carers unless it is believed that to do so would place the child at increased risk of harm.

4.2.3 If there is room for doubt as to whether a referral should be made, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will consult with children’s social care on a no names basis without identifying the family. However, as soon as sufficient concern exists that a child may be at risk of significant harm, a s47 referral to children’s social care will be made without delay (and in any event within 24 hours).

4.2.4 If the initial referral is made by telephone, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will confirm the referral in writing to children’s social care within 24 hours. If no response or acknowledgment is received within one working day, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will contact children’s social care again.

4.2.5 In circumstances where a pupil has not suffered and is not likely to suffer significant harm but is in need of additional support from one or more agencies, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will liaise with children’s social care and/or children’s services and where appropriate a child in need (s17) inter-agency assessment will take place, including use of the Common Assessment Framework / Early Help or Team around the Child approaches, as necessary. Decisions to seek such support for a pupil will be taken in consultation with the pupil and, where appropriate, the parents.

4.2.6 Where relevant, the College will co-operate with the Channel panel and the police in providing any relevant information so that each can effectively carry out its functions to determine whether an individual is vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism. The College will respond to requests for information from the police promptly and in any event within five to ten working days.

4.3 Dealing with allegations against staff, Directors and volunteers

4.3.1 The College has procedures for dealing with allegations against staff, Directors and volunteers who work with children that aim to strike a balance between the need to protect children from abuse and the need to protect staff and volunteers from malicious, false or unfounded allegations. These procedures are set out in Appendix 4 and follow Part 4 of Keeping children safe in education 2016.

4.3.2 The local authority has designated a particular officer, or team of officers, to be involved in the management and oversight of allegations against people that work with children (designated officer(s)). The designated officer(s) will be informed immediately and in any event within one working day of all allegations against staff, Directors and volunteers that come to the College’s attention and appear to meet the criteria set out in paragraph 1 of Appendix 4.

4.3.3 Detailed guidance is given to staff and volunteers to ensure that their behaviour and actions do not place pupils or themselves at risk of harm or of allegations of harm to a pupil. This guidance is contained in the Staff Manual / Code of Conduct – which is available on the Ashbourne Website and includes detail of additional safeguarding arrangements where staff engage in one-to-one teaching and meetings with pupils.

4.3.4 Staff and volunteers should also feel able to follow the College’s separate Whistleblowing Policy to raise concerns about poor or unsafe safeguarding practices at the College, potential failures by the College or its staff to properly safeguard the welfare of pupils or other wrongdoing in the workplace that does not involve the safeguarding and welfare of children.

4.3.5 If a staff member feels unable to raise their concerns in line with the College Whistleblowing Policy, they may instead contact a dedicated helpline hosted by the NSPCC:

NSPCC WHISTLEBLOWING HELPLINE NUMBER: 0800 028 0285

4.4 Allegations of peer on peer abuse

4.4.1 We recognise that pupils may be harmed by other young people, including other pupils of our college. They may be harmed by:

  • Bullying / cyber-bullying
  • Inappropriate or harmful sexualised behaviour
  • Gender-based violence (eg. boys experiencing initiation / hazing, girls experiencing violence from boys)
  • Grooming, either for sexual abuse, exploitation or extremism
  • Child sexual exploitation

4.4.2 We minimise the risk of peer on peer abuse in a number of ways, including through the formal and informal curriculum (PSHE, SMSC, etc) and existing policies such as our behaviour, anti-bullying and online safety / acceptable use policies.

4.4.3 Allegations against pupils should be reported in accordance with the procedures set out in this Policy. A pupil against whom a serious allegation of abuse has been made may be suspended from the College during the investigation and the College’s policy on behaviour, discipline and sanctions will apply.

4.4.4 The College will take advice from children’s social care, police and/or Channel as appropriate on the investigation of such allegations and will take all appropriate action to ensure the safety and welfare of all pupils involved including the pupil or pupils accused of abuse.

4.4.5 If it is necessary for a pupil to be interviewed by the police in relation to allegations of abuse, the College will ensure that, subject to the advice of children’s social care, the pupil’s parents are informed as soon as possible and that the pupil is supported during the interview by an appropriate adult. [• In the case of pupils whose parents are abroad, the pupil’s Education Guardian will be requested to provide support to the pupil and to accommodate [● him / her / them] if it is necessary to suspend [● him / her / them] during the investigation.]

4.4.6 Where an allegation of sexual abuse, exploitation or grooming is made against a pupil, both the victim and the alleged perpetrator will be treated as being at risk and safeguarding procedures in accordance with this Policy will be followed.

4.5 Missing child and children missing from education procedures

4.5.1 Missing Child

(a) All staff are informed of the separate procedure to be used for searching for, and if necessary, reporting, any pupil missing from College. The procedure includes the requirement to record any incident, the action taken and the reasons given by the pupil for being missing.

(b) Please see the College’s separate Missing Pupil Policy for further details.

4.5.2 Children Missing from Education

(a) In line with the Pupil (Registration) Regs 2016, the College shall inform thelocal authority (within which the College is sited) of any pupil who is going to be deleted in-year from the admission register for any of the 15 reasons listed in the Regulations. If relevant, we will also inform the local authority in which the pupil normally resides. :

(b) The local authority must be notified as soon as the grounds for deletion are met, but no later than deleting the pupil’s name from the register. This will assist the local authority to:

(i) fulfil its duty to identify children of compulsory school age who are missing education,

(ii) where applicable, liaise with the local authority where the pupil normally resides; and

(iii) follow up with any child who might be in danger of not receiving an education and who might be at risk of abuse or neglect.

4.5.3 The College shall inform the applicable local authority of any pupil of compulsory school age who fails to attend College regularly, or has been absent without the College’s permission for a continuous period of 10 College days or more, at such intervals as are agreed between the College and the local authority (or in default of such agreement, at intervals determined by the Secretary of State).

4.6 Informing parents

4.6.1 Parents will normally be kept informed as appropriate of any action to be taken under these procedures. However, there may be circumstances when the Designated Safeguarding Lead will need to consult the Principal, the designated officer, children’s social care and / or the police before discussing details with parents.

4.6.2 However, as pupils get older, legislation recognises their right to make decisions about their own information and to express their wishes and preferences. If a pupil requests that their parent/carer is not informed of action to be taken under these procedures we will consider their request within the following confines:

  • Whether informing parents would put the child at increased risk of harm
  • Whether not informing parents would place the child at increased risk of harm
  • Whether the pupil has the capacity to understand the decision they are making
  • Whether any other child(ren) may be at risk of harm due to the information available to us
  • Whether there is sufficient cause to override the pupil’s wishes in the public interest.

4.6.2 In relation to Channel referrals, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will consider seeking the consent of the pupil (or their parent/guardian) when determining what information can be shared. Whether or not consent is sought will be dependent on the circumstances of the case but may relate to issues such as the health of the individual, law enforcement or protection of the public.

4.6.3 See also section 3 of Appendix 4 for details about the disclosure of information where an allegation has been made against a member of staff, volunteer or the Principal of the College.

5. Secure College premises

5.1 The College will take all practicable steps to ensure that College premises are as secure as circumstances permit.

5.2 All College sites have a coded entry system and all entrances are secured by camera coverage, monitored by front desk staff at each site. Each College site has its own dedicated Reception / Front Desk area. The College keeps a visitors book at Reception. All visitors must sign in on arrival and sign out on departure and are escorted whilst on College premises by a member of staff or appropriately vetted volunteer. All visitors will be given a name badge with the title ‘Visitor’ which must be clearly displayed and worn at all times whilst on the College premises.

6. Confidentiality, record keeping and information sharing

6.1 Keeping children safe in education (2016) makes clear that fears about sharing information cannot be allowed to stand in the way of the need to promote the welfare and protect the safety of children: “No single professional can have a full picture of a child’s needs – everyone who comes into contact with them has a role to play in identifying concerns, sharing information and taking prompt action”

6.2 The College will keep all child protection records confidential, allowing disclosure only to those who need the information in order to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. A record will be made of who has viewed a child’s CP record, when and for what reason – this will be recorded on the child’s chronology

6.3 Where the pupil remains with us until the end of their schooling, child protection files are retained in line with national guidance:

  • If a referral has been made to children’s social care and/or the pupil was ever subject to a s47 child protection plan or other multi-agency plan, the records will be kept for 35 years
  • If no referral was made and/or there has been no multi-agency intervention, the record will be kept until the end of the academic year of their 25th birthday

6.4 Where a pupil leaves us to attend another school or FE college, the CP records will be passed to the Designated Safeguarding Lead of the new setting without delay. Wherever possible, this will be by face to face handover; if that is not possible, we will notify the new DSL that a file exists and will send the file by secure mail with confirmation of delivery.

6.5 If a CP record is to be transferred to a new setting we do not retain a copy of the record (except the chronology); the only exception would be where a CP file is being transferred by mail in which case we will retain a photocopy until receipt by the new setting is confirmed.

6.6 The College will co-operate with police and children’s social care to ensure that all relevant information is shared for the purposes of child protection investigations under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 in accordance with the requirements of Working together to safeguard children (March 2015), the Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales (2015) and Channel Duty Guidance: Protecting vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorism (2015).

6.7 Where allegations have been made against staff, the College will consult with the designated officer and, where appropriate, the police and children’s social care to agree the information that should be disclosed and to whom.

6.8 Records of an allegation against a member of staff will be retained until normal pension age or for 10 years, whichever is the longer. The only exception to this is where the allegation has been shown to be malicious, in which case all records of the allegation will be deleted.

 7. Monitoring and review

7. 1. The Designated Safeguarding Lead will ensure that the procedures set out in this Policy and the implementation of these procedures are updated and reviewed regularly, working with the Directors and consulting with staff as necessary. Opportunities are provided for staff to contribute to and shape safeguarding arrangements and child protection policy at each review point.

7.2 The Designated Safeguarding Lead will update the Senior Management Team regularly on the operation of the College’s safeguarding arrangements.

7.3. Any child protection incidents at the College will be followed by a review of these procedures by the Designated Safeguarding Lead and a report made to the Directors. Where an incident involves a member of staff, the designated officer will assist in this review to determine whether any improvements can be made to the College’s procedures. Any deficiencies or weaknesses in regard to child protection arrangements at any time will be remedied without delay.

7.4. In addition, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will undertake an annual review of this Policy and the College’s safeguarding procedures, including the effectiveness of inter-agency working. The outcome of this annual review will be reported to the full Board of Directors.

The Directors will review this Policy and the implementation of its procedures and consider the proposed amendments to the Policy, from both the Designated Safeguarding Lead and its own members, before giving the revised Policy its final approval. Detailed minutes recording the review by the Directors will be made.

8.Contacts

8.1 The details of the designated officer are as follows:

FRANCES BURNS
Ashbourne College
17, Old Court Place,
London. W8 4PL
TEL: 0207 937 3858
frances.burns@ashbournecollege.co.uk

8.2 The telephone numbers of the Tri Borough (Kensington & Chelsea, Westminster, Hammersmith & Fulham) Children’s Social Care Department are as follows:

RBKC Child Protection Services Kensington and Chelsea Duty Line – Tel: 020 7361 3013 (Out of hours – 020 7361 3013)

 

RBKC Social Services Alexandra Handford
Safeguarding Manager (Acting)
Telephone: 0207 598 4638
Mobile: 07973 564580
Email: Alexandra.Handford@rbkc.gov
Tri-Borough Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) Esohoe Erhahon
Education Lead, Tri-Borough MASH
Telephone: 020 7641 5026
Email: eerhahon@westminster.gov.uk 
Contact details for the Tri-Borough Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) for referral and management of allegations against staff: Jane Foster
Safe Organisation Manager and Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO)
Telephone: 020 7641 6108
Email: jfoster1@westminster.gov.uk
Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Training, Consultation and Advice for Schools and Education:

 

Hilary Shaw
Tri-Borough Safeguarding and Child Protection Schools and Education Officer
Telephone: 020 7598 4876
Mobile: 07817 365 519
Email: Hilary.Shaw@rbkc.gov.uk

8.3 The telephone numbers of relevant Prevent partners are as follows

Tri Borough PREVENT Officer

 

Jake Butterworth

 

 

Room 224, Hammersmith Town Hall

Email: jake.butterworth@lbhf.gov.uk

Secure email: jake.butterworth@lbhf.gcsx.gov.uk

Tel: 0208 753 5843

 

 

Channel Adviser Contact: Pinakin Patel

 

Pinakin.patel@lbhf.gov.uk

 

8.4 Contacts for pupils:

RBKC Local Safeguarding Children’s Board Kensington and Chelsea Social Services:

 

socialservices@rbkc.gov.uk

or tel: 020 7361 3013

 

Childline 0800 1111
NSPCC

Children’s Commissioner

0808 800 5000

0800 528 0731]

College approved counsellor

 

 

Catherine McCloskey
Tel: 07584 135 380
Email:  catherine@space-to-talk.com andmccloskeycj@aol.com

Website: http://www.space-to-talk.com/index.html

 

Authorised by Resolution of Directors
Signed

Date

…………………..

Stephen Chang /

Effective date of the policy 05 September 2016

 

 Authorised by Mike Kirby (Principal)
Date 05 September 2016
Effective date of the policy 05 September 2016
Circulation Teaching staff / all staff / parents / Students on request
Review date June 2017

 
 


Appendix 1. The Designated Safeguarding Lead

1 The Designated Safeguarding Lead for the College site is FRANCES BURNS, DSL, who may be contacted on 0207 937 3858

2 The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead is LEE KIRBY, Deputy DSL, who may be contacted on 0207 937 3858

3 The Safeguarding Lead will NOT delegate their strategic duties. The main responsibilities of the Designated Safeguarding Lead are included in that person’s job description and can be found in Keeping children safe in education (2016) annex B

  1. The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead will carry out this role where the Designated Safeguarding Lead is unavailable.
  2. The Designated Safeguarding Lead and the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead have undertaken child protection training and training in inter-agency working, and will attend refresher training at two-yearly intervals with at least annual updates in order to:

5.1. understand the assessment process for providing early help and intervention, for example through locally agreed common and shared assessment processes such as early help assessments;

5.2. have a working knowledge of how local authorities conduct a child protection case conference and a child protection review conference and be able to attend and contribute to these effectively when required to do so;

5.3. ensure each member of staff has access to and understands the College’s child protection policy and procedures, especially new and part time staff;

5.4. be alert to the specific needs of children in need, those with special educational needs and young carers;

5.5. be able to keep detailed, accurate, secure written records of concerns and referrals;

5.6. obtain access to resources and attend any relevant or refresher training courses;

5.7. encourage a culture of listening to children and taking account of their wishes and feelings, among all staff, in any measures the College may put in place to protect them and to meet the requirements and procedures of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board.

Appendix 2. Types and signs of abuse

Types of abuse

1.1. Abuse is a form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, by others (e.g. via the internet). They may be abused by an adult or adults or another child or children. Part one of Keeping children safe in education 2015 defines the following types of abuse.

1.2. Physical abuse: a form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

1.3. Emotional abuse: the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone.

1.4. Sexual abuse: involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

1.5. Neglect: the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to: provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

1.6. Keeping children safe in education 2016 lists the following as specific safeguarding issues:

1.6.1 children missing from education

Knowing where children are during school hours is an extremely important aspect of Safeguarding. Missing school can be an indicator of abuse and neglect and may also raise concerns about child sexual exploitation. We monitor attendance carefully and address poor or irregular attendance without delay. This is particularly vital for our Middle School pupils who tend to be statutory school age.

In line with the Pupil (Registration) Regs* (2016) Ashbourne has:

1.Staff who understand what to do when children do not attend regularly
2. Appropriate policies, procedures and responses for pupils who go missing from education (especially on repeat occasions).
3. Staff who know the signs and triggers for travelling to conflict zones, FGM and forced marriage.
4. Procedures to inform the local authority when we plan to take pupils off-roll at non-standard transition points:

We will ensure that pupils who are expected to attend the college but fail to take up the place will be referred to the local authority.

When a pupil leaves the school, we will record the name of the pupil’s new school and their expected start date.

NB * See also our ‘Starters & Leavers’ Protocol Update: Ashbourne will notify the local RBKC CME contact in line with new statutory procedures on a weekly basis.

1.6.2 children missing from home or care

1.6.3 bullying including cyberbullying

1.6.4 domestic violence

1.6.5 drugs

1.6.6 fabricated or induced illness

1.6.7 faith abuse

1.6.8 forced marriage

1.6.9 honour based violence and abuse, including forced marriage, FGM, breast ironing and other abuses linked to so-called ‘honour’

1.6.10 gangs and youth violence

1.6.11 gender-based violence / violence against women and girls

1.6.12 peer relationship abuse

1.6.13 mental health

1.6.12 private fostering

1.6.13 preventing radicalisation (see section 3 below)

1.6.14 sexting / youth produced imagery

1.6.15 teenage relationship abuse

1.6.16 trafficking.

Details of the above can be found in the government document ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education Part 1 – September 2016, available to view and download here

1.6.17 Child sexual exploitation is a form of sexual abuse where children are sexually exploited for money, power or status. It can involve violent, humiliating and degrading sexual assaults. In some cases, young people are persuaded or forced into exchanging sexual activity for money, drugs, gifts, affection or status. Consent cannot be given, even where a child may believe they are voluntarily engaging in sexual activity with the person who is exploiting them. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact and can happen online. A significant number of children who are victims of sexual exploitation go missing from home, care and education at some point. Some of the following signs may be indicators of sexual exploitation:

  • Children who appear with unexplained gifts or new possessions;
  • Children who associate with other young people involved in exploitation;
  • Children who have older boyfriends or girlfriends;
  • Children who suffer from sexually transmitted infections or become pregnant;
  • Children who suffer from changes in emotional well-being;
  • Children who misuse drugs and alcohol;
  • Children who go missing for periods of time or regularly come home late; and
  • Children who regularly miss school or education or do not take part in education. 1.6.18 So called ‘honour based’ violence (HBV) includes a range of abuses undertaken to protect or defend the perceived honour of a family, cultural group or community. It may include, but is not limited to, forced marriage, FGM (see below), breast ironing, abuse linked to a belief in spirit possession. All forms of HBV are abuse and should be passed to the DSL in line with College procedures.

1.6.19 Female genital mutilation: is a type of so called ‘honour based’ violence. Professionals in all agencies, and individuals and groups in relevant communities, need to be alert to the possibility of a girl being at risk of FGM, or already having suffered FGM. There is a range of potential indicators that a child or young person may be at risk of FGM, which individually may not indicate risk but if there are two or more indicators present this could signal a risk to the child or young person.

Victims of FGM are likely to come from a community that is known to practise FGM. Professionals should note that girls at risk of FGM may not yet be aware of the practice or that it may be conducted on them, so sensitivity should always be shown when approaching the subject. Warning signs that FGM may be about to take place, or may have already taken place, can be found on pages 11-12 of the Multi-Agency Practice Guidelines. Staff who believe a girl may be at risk of FGM (as opposed to becoming aware that FGM has been carried out) should pass their concerns to the Designated Safeguarding Lead in line with our Child Protection policy and Procedures.

The Mandatory Duty to report FGM In line with the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 (amended by the Serious Crime Act 2015) if a teacher or member of support staff becomes aware that a girl has experienced FGM (as opposed to suspects she may be at risk), they have a duty to notify the police without delay. Wherever possible, the staff member should also notify the College Designated Safeguarding Lead unless they have good reason not to. .

2. Signs and indicators of abuse

2.1 Possible signs / indicators of abuse include, but are not limited to:

2.1.1 the pupil says [● he / she / they] has been abused or asks a question or makes a comment which gives rise to that inference

2.1.2 there is no reasonable or consistent explanation for a pupil’s injury, the injury is unusual in kind or location or there have been a number of injuries and there is a pattern to the injuries

2.1.3 the pupil’s behaviour stands out from the group as either being extreme model behaviour or extremely challenging behaviour, or there is a sudden or significant change in the pupil’s behaviour

2.1.4 the pupil asks to drop subjects with a particular teacher and seems reluctant to discuss the reasons

2.1.5 the pupil’s development is delayed, the pupil loses or gains weight or there is deterioration in the pupil’s general wellbeing

2.1.6 the pupil appears neglected, e.g. dirty, hungry, inadequately clothed

2.1.7 the pupil is reluctant to go home, or has been openly rejected by his / her parents or carers and

2.1.8 inappropriate behaviour displayed by other members of staff or any other person working with children, for example inappropriate sexual comments; excessive one to one attention beyond the requirements of their usual role or responsibilities; or inappropriate sharing of images.

2.2 The Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) Safeguarding Children Board can provide advice on the signs of abuse and the DfE advice What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused (2015) provides advice in identifying child abuse. The NSPCC website is also a good source of information and advice.

3. Radicalisation and the Prevent duty

3.1 The College has a legal duty to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism.

3.2 The College aims to build pupils’ resilience to radicalisation by promoting fundamental British values and enabling them to challenge extremist views. The College is committed to providing a safe space in which children, young people and staff can understand the risks associated with terrorism and develop the knowledge and skills to be able to challenge extremist arguments.

3.3 The College has adopted the Government’s definitions for the purposes of compliance with the Prevent duty:

Extremism: “vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. We also include in our definition of extremism calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas”

Radicalisation: “the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and forms of extremism leading to terrorism”

3.4 There is no single way of identifying an individual who is likely to be susceptible to a terrorist ideology. As with managing other safeguarding risks, staff should be alert to changes in children’s behaviour which could indicate that they may be in need of help or protection. Children at risk of radicalisation may display different signs or seek to hide their views. College staff should use their professional judgement in identifying children who might be at risk of radicalisation and act proportionately. In particular, outward expressions of faith, in the absence of any other indicator of vulnerability, will not be regarded as a reason to make a referral to Channel.

3.5 Channel Duty Guidance: Protecting vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorism (2015) notes the following:

3.6. There is no single way of identifying who is likely to be vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism. Factors that may have a bearing on someone becoming vulnerable may include: peer pressure, influence from other people or via the internet, bullying, crime against them or their involvement in crime, anti-social behaviour, family tensions, race/hate crime, lack of self-esteem or identity and personal or political grievances.

Example indicators that an individual is engaged with an extremist group, cause or ideology include:

  • spending increasing time in the company of other suspected extremists;
  • changing their style of dress or personal appearance to accord with the group;
  • day-to-day behaviour becoming increasingly centred around an extremist ideology, group or cause;
  • loss of interest in other friends and activities not associated with the extremist ideology, group or cause;
  • possession of material or symbols associated with an extremist cause (e.g. the swastika for far right groups);
  • attempts to recruit others to the group/cause/ideology; or
  • communications with others that suggest identification with a group/cause/ideology.
  1. Example indicators that an individual has an intention to cause harm, use violence or other illegal means include:
  • clearly identifying another group as threatening what they stand for and blaming that group for all social or political ills;
  • using insulting or derogatory names or labels for another group;
  • speaking about the imminence of harm from the other group and the importance of action now;
  • expressing attitudes that justify offending on behalf of the group, cause or ideology;
  • condoning or supporting violence or harm towards others; or
  • plotting or conspiring with others.”

3.7 Protecting children from the risk of radicalisation is part of the College’s wider safeguarding duties, and is similar in nature to protecting children from other harms (e.g. drugs, gangs, neglect, sexual exploitation), whether these come from within their family or are the product of outside influences.

Appendix 3 Guidance for staff and volunteers on suspecting or hearing a disclosure of abuse
  1. Action staff must take
  • 1. A member of staff or volunteer suspecting or hearing a disclosure of abuse:
  • 1.1 must listen carefully to the child and keep an open mind. The member of staff should not take a decision as to whether or not the abuse has taken place;
  • 1.2 must not ask leading questions, i.e. a question which suggests its own answer. Instead, use TED (tell, explain, describe) to clarify the information you are being given;
  • 1.3 must reassure the child but not give a guarantee of absolute confidentiality. The member of staff should explain that they need to pass on the information in accordance with this Policy so that the correct action can be taken; and
  • 1.4 must keep a sufficient record of the conversation. The record should include:
  • (a) the date and time;
  • (b) the place of the conversation; and
  • (c) the essence of what was said and done by whom and in whose presence; and
  • (d) must be signed by the person making it, using names and not initials.

1.2. The written record and all other evidence, for example, scribbled notes, mobile phones containing text messages, clothing, computers, must be kept securely and passed on when reporting the matter in accordance with paragraph 1.3 below..

1.3. All concerns, suspicions or disclosures of abuse must be reported to the Designated Safeguarding Lead as soon as possible, unless it is an allegation against a member of staff in which case the procedures set out in Appendix 4 should be followed.

1.4. If, at any point, there is a risk of immediate serious harm to a child a referral should be made to children’s social care immediately. Anybody can make a referral. If the child’s situation does not appear to be improving the staff member with concerns should press for re-consideration.

Appendix 4. Dealing with allegations against members of staff, the Principal Directors or volunteers

The College’s procedures

1.1. The College’s procedures for dealing with allegations made against staff will be used where the member of staff, the Principal Director or volunteer has:

1.1.1. behaved in a way that has harmed a child, or may have harmed a child;

1.1.2. possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child; or

1.1.3. behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates he or she would pose a risk of harm to children.

1.2. Any allegations not meeting these criteria will be dealt with in accordance with the RBKC Local Safeguarding Children Board procedures. Advice from the designated officer will be sought in borderline cases.

1.3. All such allegations must be dealt with as a priority without delay.

1.4. Allegations against a teacher who is no longer teaching and historical allegations will be referred to the police.

2. Reporting an allegation against a member of staff, the Principal Director or volunteer

2.1. Where an allegation or complaint is made against any member of staff, the Designated Safeguarding Lead or a volunteer, the matter should be reported immediately to the Principal, or in [• his / her / their] absence to the Nominated Safeguarding Director. The allegation will be discussed immediately with the designated officer before further action is taken. Where appropriate, the Principal will consult with the Designated Safeguarding Lead.

2.2. Where an allegation or complaint is made against the Principal, the matter should be reported immediately to Chair or the Nominated Safeguarding Director, without first notifying the Principal. The allegation will be discussed immediately with the designated officer before further action is taken. The Chair will consult the Nominated Safeguarding Director, and vice versa.

2.3. Where an allegation is made against any Governor, the matter should be reported immediately to the Chair or the Nominated Safeguarding Director. The allegation will be discussed immediately with the designated officer before further action is taken. Where appropriate, the Chair will consult the Nominated Safeguarding Director, and vice versa.

2.4. If it is not possible to report to the Principal or Chair or Nominated Safeguarding Director in the circumstances set out above, a report should be made immediately to the Designated Safeguarding Lead or, if he / she is unavailable, the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead. The Designated Safeguarding Lead will take action in accordance with these procedures and will as soon as possible inform the Principal or, where appropriate, Chair and the Nominated Safeguarding Director.

2.5. The person taking action in accordance with the procedures in this Appendix is known as the “case manager”.

3. Disclosure of information

3.1. The case manager will inform the accused person of the allegation as soon as possible after the designated officer has been consulted.

3.2. The parents of the child[ren] involved will be informed of the allegation as soon as possible if they do not already know of it. They will also be kept informed of the progress of the case, including the outcome (but not the detail) of any disciplinary process. The timing and extent of disclosures, and the terms on which they are made, will be dependent upon and subject to the laws on confidence and data protection and the advice of external agencies.

3.3. Where the designated officer advises that a strategy discussion is needed, or the police or children’s social care need to be involved, the case manager will not inform the accused or the parents or carers until these agencies have been consulted and it has been agreed what information can be disclosed.

3.4. The reporting restrictions preventing the identification of a teacher who is the subject of such an allegation in certain circumstances will be observed.

4. Further action to be taken by the College

4.1. A College has a duty of care towards its employees and as such, it must ensure that effective support is provided for anyone facing an allegation. The College will take action in accordance with Part four of Keeping children safe in education 2016 and the College’s employment procedures.

5. Ceasing to use staff

5.1. If the College ceases to use the services of a member of staff or volunteer because they are unsuitable to work with children, a settlement/compromise agreement will not be used and a referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service will be made as soon as possible if the criteria are met. Any such incidents will be followed by a review of the safeguarding procedures within the College, with a report being presented to the Directors without delay.

5.2. If a member of staff or volunteer tenders his or her resignation, or ceases to provide his or her services, any child protection allegations will still be followed up by the College in accordance with this policy and a referral will be made to the Disclosure and Barring Service as soon as possible if the criteria are met.

5.3. Where a teacher has been dismissed, or would have been dismissed had he / she not resigned, separate consideration will be given as to whether a referral to the National College for Teaching and Leadership should be made.

6. Unsubstantiated, false or malicious allegations

6.1. Where an allegation by a pupil is shown to have been deliberately invented or malicious, the Principal will consider whether to take disciplinary action in accordance with the College’s behaviour and discipline policy.

6.2. Where a parent has made a deliberately invented or malicious allegation the Principal will consider whether to require that parent to withdraw their child or children from the College on the basis that they have treated the College or a member of staff unreasonably.

6.3. Whether or not the person making the allegation is a pupil or a parent (or staff member other member of the public), the College reserves the right to contact the police to determine whether any action might be appropriate.

7. Record keeping

7.1. Details of allegations found to be malicious will be removed from personnel records.

7.2. For all other allegations, full details will be recorded on the confidential personnel file of the person accused. The record will be retained at least until the individual has reached normal pension age or for a period of ten years from the date of the allegation, if this is longer[1].

7.3. An allegation proven to be false, unsubstantiated or malicious will not be referred to in employer references. In accordance with Keeping children safe in education 2016, a history of repeated concerns or allegations which have all been found to be false, unsubstantiated or malicious will also not be included in any reference

Appendix 5. Role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director

1. The Board of Directors have nominated one of its members to take leadership of the College’s safeguarding arrangements on behalf of the Board and to liaise with external agencies where this is required, including in the event of allegations of abuse made against the Principal or a member of the Board of Directors. The Nominated Safeguarding Director is Stephan Chang.

2. The Nominated Safeguarding Director will play an essential role in ensuring children are kept safe from harm. If the Nominated Safeguarding Director is unavailable his / her role and duties will be carried out by the Chair.

3. The Nominated Safeguarding Director and the Chair will undertake appropriate training in accordance with the Local Safeguarding Children Board’s recommendations to fulfil the role and duties.

4. The main role and duties of the Nominated Safeguarding Director are to:

4.1. be familiar with the Local Safeguarding Children Board guidance and procedures relating to safeguarding and child protection and associated issues, and to attend training for nominated safeguarding and child protection governors, where available;

4.2. ensure that the Directors put in place a suitable safeguarding and child protection policy and associated procedures which have regard to regulations and standards issued by the Secretary of State for Education (DfE) in accordance with section 94 of the Education and Skills Act 2008 and sections 29 and 38 of the Counter- Terrorism and Security Act 2015 and associated regulations;

4.3. champion safeguarding and child protection issues within the College;

4.4. encourage other members of the Board of Directors to develop their understanding of the Board of Directors’ responsibilities with regard to child protection and assist them to perform their functions in respect of safeguarding children and young people;

4.5. contribute to ensuring any deficiencies in the College’s safeguarding practices which may be brought to Directors’ attention by a member of College staff, a parent, an officer of the local authority or from any other source are addressed;

4.6. meet regularly with the College’s Designated Safeguarding Lead in order to monitor the effectiveness of the College’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures and the implementation of these across the College. It is recommended that this is at least a termly meeting;

4.7. ensure that the Directors receive an annual report on the implementation of the College’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures from the Designated Safeguarding Lead;

4.8. ensure that the Designated Safeguarding Lead is part of the College’s senior leadership team, and has sufficient time and resources at his / her disposal to carry out his / her duties effectively;

4.9. ensure that a Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead is identified;

4.10. ensure that the Designated Safeguarding Lead and Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead receive the necessary training at least every two years – and keep updated on all new training aspects related to Safeguarding or Child Protection at least anually;

4.11. ensure that training in child protection is provided to all staff, including Lunch Time Supervisors, administrative staff and other ancillary staff, in accordance with the Local Safeguarding Children Board recommendations with at least annual updates;

4.12. ensure that arrangements are in place for the inclusion of child protection training on the College’s procedures in an induction programme for all people working in the College, no matter for how long, nor the status of that individual;

4.13. ensure arrangements are in place to ensure safer recruitment procedures and appropriate checks are undertaken on all new staff and volunteers and to carry out a check of the College’s Single Central Register on at least an annual basis;

4.14. be aware of how safeguarding and child protection issues are addressed through the curriculum and to take responsibility at Governor level to ensure that pupils are taught about safeguarding and given guidance on adjusting behaviour to reduce risks including the safe use of electronic devices and the internet, building resilience to protect themselves and their peers, and provided with information about who they should turn to for help within in the College;

4.15. to provide information to the local authority about how the Board of Directors’ duties in respect of safeguarding and child protection have been discharged if requested.

5. The Nominated Safeguarding Director or the Chair will liaise with the Principal and the local authority regarding all confidential child protection issues involving allegations against staff.

6. Where there is an allegation of abuse against the Principal, or against a member of the Board of Directors, the Nominated Safeguarding Director or the Chair (as appropriate in the circumstances) will take the lead in liaising with the local authority and/or other partner agencies including:

6.1 notifying the designated officer of the local authority immediately before any action is taken;

6.2 ensuring, with local authority support, that appropriate action is taken in accordance with agreed Local Safeguarding Children Board procedures;

6.3 attending initial and subsequent strategy meetings as required if other agencies are involved;

6.4 taking the lead in an investigation (when the Principal is unable to do so) under the College’s internal employment procedures when the other agencies’ involvement is at an end or as soon as it is confirmed that this may take place;

6.5 taking the lead in reviewing the College’s child protection and safeguarding policies and procedures with the Designated Safeguarding Lead, taking advice from the designated officer of the local authority, and making the necessary changes;

6.6 by sound use of all available data as indicated above, ensuring mechanisms are in place to enable staff, visitors and volunteers understand their responsibilities for safeguarding and child protection as outlined in Keeping children safe in education (2016).